Pronunciation help needed - ancient Greek

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lubee930
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Post by lubee930 » September 17th, 2014, 3:45 am

Rapunzelina wrote:Hi Lucretia!
This is how I'd say the words, if you're still accepting pronunciation suggestions:
https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/greekwords.mp3
ro-POH, ree-POH, e-pe-kser-ga-SI-a
:)
Perfect--thank you so much for taking the time to help, Rapunzelina! :)
Kind regards,
Lucretia

Lynnet
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Post by Lynnet » October 26th, 2014, 6:54 am

I'm reading a section in Plutarch and it quotes Homer:

Ζεῦ πάτεϱ Ἴδηθεν μεδέων, and Ζεῦ ἄνα Δωδωναῖε

also:
ἀναδωδωναῖε

and
ἀνάδοσις

and εὐϱύοπα Κϱονίδην

Can anyone help? I haven't got a clue :oops: (Phonetic and simple would help :lol: )
Lynne
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Post by Cori » January 31st, 2015, 6:11 am

I hope you got your piece sorted out, Lynne?

I have a burst of Socrates in my current book, would very much appreciate clues on how to pronounce it: Image
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

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Post by Rapunzelina » February 1st, 2015, 2:32 pm

Hi Cori! Do you have a link to the whole page? The context might help - if it's relevant :lol:

ETA: Is it perhaps the beginning of Plato's Apology?

ETA 2: OK, I found it :D It's from England and the English. I'll prepare a recording of how I'd say it.

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Post by Cori » February 1st, 2015, 2:44 pm

Ah yes, sorry about that. The context is kinda weird, this is the end of the paragraph.
What Socrates of London would commence a discourse, "Oh men of London!" "<Greek text here> ..."
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

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Post by Rapunzelina » February 1st, 2015, 2:51 pm

Here's how I'd say it (though an Erasmian student of Greek might disagree :mrgreen: ): https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/menofathens.mp3

Transliterated: OH-tee ee-mEEs, OH AN-thres (th as in the) a-thee-NEH-ee (th as in think)
It would translate to something like: That YOU, oh men Athenian!

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Post by Cori » February 2nd, 2015, 12:18 pm

Thankyou, that's wonderful!

(And, the Erasmian students will have to get in line behind the French and German speakers whose languages I've maltreated, not to mention the dubious pronunciation of my own tongue. If I never have to read 'infinitesimal' again, it'll still be too soon! :evil: :lol: )
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

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Post by roxy2012 » June 20th, 2015, 6:33 pm

I'm doing an essay that has some greek, and I know nothing of the greek language. If I could get the pronunciations of these words, or a way to work through it. I may have misspelled the greek, so I tried to give some context. Oh, and yes it's and article about human sacrifice.

—Sacrifice is either propitiatory, to add strength and perfection to prayer_ for αί μέν χωρίς θυσίων εύχαί λόγοι μόνον είσίν, καί δέ μετά θνσίων λόγοι—

—It is expressed in the Aeschylean aphorism, πάθει μάθος —“nothing suffer, nothing learn”; and still more in the lines,
μίμνει δέ μίμνοντος έν θρόνω Διός
παθεΐν τόν έρξαντα θέσμιον γάρ
“while Zeus sits on his throne, the law that the doer shall suffer must stand.” The honor of the gods was engaged; mankind would cease to believe in them, έρρει τόν θεΐα, if they allowed sin to go unpunished.—-

—It ws a great point in such sacrifices στόματός τε καλλιπρώρον Φυλκά κατασχεΐν, Φθόγγον άραίον όίκοις. The voluntary meekness of the victim, going as a lamb to the slaughter.—

— casued by the motion of the primum mobile in the ecliptic. Φθορά, the necessary prelude of all production…that flesh and bones were the simple elements and the universal germs (πανσπερμία) of earth, water, and air.--

—But there is an ethical relationship between the two acts expressed by the verb Φθειρείν. Leaving to general moralists and phsycologists, we may observe that,—-

—the sacrifice of Iphigenia; and Herodotus calls the sacrifice of two Egyptian boys by Menelaus, to obtain a fair wind, an unholy act—πρήγμα ούκ όσιον. Aeschylus and Herodotus are the earliest writers who mention it,—-

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Post by Rapunzelina » June 21st, 2015, 12:23 am

Here's how I'd say it: https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/greek_human_sacrifice.mp3

follow the recording with the transliteration below, I hope it helps:

eh men ho-rees thee-see-on ef-heh loh-gee mo-non ee-seen, eh the meh-tah thee-see-on em-psee-hee loh-gee

pah-thee mah-thos

mee-mnee the mee-mnon-dos en thro-noh Thee-os pah-theen ton er-ksan-da thes-mion gar

sto-mah-tos ka-lee-pro-roo fee-la-kan ka-ta-skeen ftho-gon ah-reh-on ee-kees

ftho-rah

pan-sper-mee-ah

fthee-reen

pree-gmah ook oh-see-on

roxy2012
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Post by roxy2012 » June 21st, 2015, 7:05 am

Thanks so much. I think I got them all except this one.

“while Zeus sits on his throne, the law that the doer shall suffer must stand.” The honor of the gods was engaged; mankind would cease to believe in them, έρρει τόν θεΐα, if they allowed sin to go unpunished.—-

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Post by tovarisch » June 21st, 2015, 7:17 am

I think that should be "ER-ray TON thEh-yah" , but that's only an educated guess... :|
tovarisch
  • reality prompts me to scale down my reading, sorry to say
    to PLers: do correct my pronunciation please

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Post by Rapunzelina » June 21st, 2015, 2:26 pm

sorry I missed it :)
Yes, tovarisch's suggestion would work :thumbs:

roxy2012
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Post by roxy2012 » June 21st, 2015, 3:01 pm

:lol: Got it! You people are awesome!

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Post by barbara2 » July 25th, 2015, 4:40 pm

Help! I need to pronounce the Greek of the last 2 lines of the epigram about Lais
and her mirror but I cannot find any Greek text that can be copied and pasted.

The lines are on page 161 of:

https://archive.org/stream/essaysselectedfr00johnuoft#page/160/mode/2up

Thanks,

Barbara

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Post by Rapunzelina » July 25th, 2015, 10:05 pm

This is a recording of how I'd say it (not necessarily the only correct way :mrgreen: ) https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/greeklines.mp3

Here are the greek characters:
Τη Παφίητο κάτοπτρον, επει τοίη μεν οράσθαι.
Ουκ εθέλω, οίη δ' ην πάρος, θ' δύναμαι.

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