Pronunciation help: all languages

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Availle
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Post by Availle » January 17th, 2021, 5:23 am

JoannaHoyt wrote:
January 17th, 2021, 5:14 am
Alas, I can't help with the Irish names, but have a name pronunciation question of my own: I'm reading Leo Tolstoy's "What Shall We Do?" and am about to start the chapter detailing his visit to the Rzhanoff buildings. I am at a loss as to how to pronounce the initial "Rzh." Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Since it's a name not a word, Forvo doesn't have it.
Joanna, there is no need to post the same pronunciation question three times in different parts of the forum. I have deleted the other two, since this here is the most appropriate place for it.
Cheers, Ava.
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JoannaHoyt
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Post by JoannaHoyt » January 17th, 2021, 5:49 am

Joanna, there is no need to post the same pronunciation question three times in different parts of the forum. I have deleted the other two, since this here is the most appropriate place for it.
[/quote]

Sorry. I wasn't sure which place was best. Next time I'll just ask once and ask if it should be moved. Thank you.

Kazbek
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Post by Kazbek » January 17th, 2021, 7:55 am

JoannaHoyt wrote:
January 17th, 2021, 5:14 am
Alas, I can't help with the Irish names, but have a name pronunciation question of my own: I'm reading Leo Tolstoy's "What Shall We Do?" and am about to start the chapter detailing his visit to the Rzhanoff buildings. I am at a loss as to how to pronounce the initial "Rzh." Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Since it's a name not a word, Forvo doesn't have it.
It's the Russian r sound, followed by zh as in garage, as heard at the start of this word:

https://forvo.com/search/%D1%80%D0%B6%D0%B0%D0%B2%D1%87%D0%B8%D0%BD%D0%B0/

Not an easy sound combination for English speakers! Also, this is a rare Russian name where the stress can fall on either syllable, depending on how the family pronounces it.

Michael

JoannaHoyt
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Post by JoannaHoyt » January 17th, 2021, 8:24 am


It's the Russian r sound, followed by zh as in garage, as heard at the start of this word:

https://forvo.com/search/%D1%80%D0%B6%D0%B0%D0%B2%D1%87%D0%B8%D0%BD%D0%B0/

Not an easy sound combination for English speakers! Also, this is a rare Russian name where the stress can fall on either syllable, depending on how the family pronounces it.

Michael
Thank you very much! :clap: I'll practice that a bit before I go on to recording.

realisticspeakers
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Post by realisticspeakers » January 27th, 2021, 11:37 am

Is this English recording of a citation for a French article a forgivable performance?
Not necessarily for Librivox standards, but for your own standards?

Were you to hear this, would it disturb you (the native OR learned French Speaker) beyond an amused chuckle thinking, "nice try"; or would it disturb you to the point of shaking your head in disgust, ruining the story experience?

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/French_Citation.mp3
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Disclaimer:
"Kind reader, if this our performance doth in aught fall short of promise, blame not our good intent, but our unperfect wit."

ezwa
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Post by ezwa » January 27th, 2021, 12:37 pm

realisticspeakers wrote:
January 27th, 2021, 11:37 am
Is this English recording of a citation for a French article a forgivable performance?

To my French native speaker's ears, I had a hard time understanding what you said at first (well, you say it quite fast (it's not too fast but I needed to adjust my ears to an English speaker's accent)).
Then, I understood: "Notice sur la vie et* les travaux de Robert Fulton." If I heard it right, I don't see why it wouldn't be good to go. :)

* the "t" in "et" is not pronounced. "Et" sounds like the English letter "a."
Ezwa

« Heureux qui... sait d'une voix légère passer du grave au doux, du plaisant au sévère »
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Envie de poésie ? RDV ici.
Envie de dramatique ? RDV ici.
PIANIST(s) WANTED here.
PLing French?!?! Why not? Come here or there

realisticspeakers
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Post by realisticspeakers » January 27th, 2021, 2:14 pm

ezwa wrote:
January 27th, 2021, 12:37 pm
realisticspeakers wrote:
January 27th, 2021, 11:37 am
Is this English recording of a citation for a French article a forgivable performance?

To my French native speaker's ears, I had a hard time understanding what you said at first (well, you say it quite fast (it's not too fast but I needed to adjust my ears to an English speaker's accent)).
Then, I understood: "Notice sur la vie et* les travaux de Robert Fulton." If I heard it right, I don't see why it wouldn't be good to go. :)

* the "t" in "et" is not pronounced. "Et" sounds like the English letter "a."
thank you!
Truth exists for the wise, Beauty for a feeling heart: They belong to each other. - Beethoven
Disclaimer:
"Kind reader, if this our performance doth in aught fall short of promise, blame not our good intent, but our unperfect wit."

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Post by mightyfelix » February 20th, 2021, 12:51 pm

I'm hoping to recruit some help with this project that I've just opened up: From Ritual to Romance by Jessie Laidlay Weston It is a study of some of the origins and influences of the King Arthur legends.

Almost every chapter has lengthy quotations in French and/or German, and a little bit of Latin. I don't think there are other languages, but I could be mistaken. Since so many of the quotations are quite long, I'd like them to be as fluent as possible. Are there any French/German speakers who would be willing to record these portions for inclusion in the final chapter(s)? Or, you're of course welcome to claim an entire chapter yourself if you're comfortable with the languages. If you're willing to help, please post in the project thread, linked above, and thanks in advance! :D

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Post by Kitty » February 20th, 2021, 1:42 pm

mightyfelix wrote:
February 20th, 2021, 12:51 pm
I'm hoping to recruit some help with this project that I've just opened up: From Ritual to Romance by Jessie Laidlay Weston It is a study of some of the origins and influences of the King Arthur legends.
just for the record, I replied in the thread to offer help :)

Sonia
Please join us all in our March clean-up event.
Let's bring those projects to a close. :9:

CassiopeiaSparks
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Post by CassiopeiaSparks » March 1st, 2021, 8:27 pm

I'm working on recording a section of a biography (Charles the Bold) which references people from different countries, quotes letters written in old english, and uses phrases of mixed languages.
I'm trying to determine when to use the original foreign pronounciation (ie, reading "de par de ça" in my best french accent) or when to use the author's english on words that have been culturally stolen/adopted into english (ie, "a declaration that the fiefs and arrière-fiefs...", where I bolded the word I'm indecisive about.)
Generally I assume that if PG prints it in italics, it's best to be read as close as possible to the original accent, while if it's in normal font alongside other english words, it should be read in english...
If that made sense to you, would you agree with my conclusion, or do you have other tips on distinguishing which pronunciation to use?
so mote it be
"They wear a mask which seems like concentrated sunshine, and it comes from within."
(The Face of Liberty, H.W. Collingwood)

I've joined the MARCH to the finish line! viewtopic.php?f=2&t=85943

Availle
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Post by Availle » March 1st, 2021, 8:36 pm

This seems to be from a group project - your BC will be happy to help you with these issues. :D
Cheers, Ava.
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CassiopeiaSparks
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Post by CassiopeiaSparks » March 1st, 2021, 8:56 pm

Well, yes, these examples are from a group project. And I'm sure I could get assistance with specific words on that thread.
But they also recommended this thread for pronunciation questions, which I thought might be a better place for the broader question. Perhaps I was too broad.
so mote it be
"They wear a mask which seems like concentrated sunshine, and it comes from within."
(The Face of Liberty, H.W. Collingwood)

I've joined the MARCH to the finish line! viewtopic.php?f=2&t=85943

Availle
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Post by Availle » March 1st, 2021, 9:05 pm

This thread is mainly meant for questions as in "How do I pronounce this word I cannot even read".

Your question was "I know how to pronounce this but I'm not sure if I should do it in this case". This is a question that your BC can clarify, provided he/she prefers a certain consistency throughout the project. And in a solo you can decide this yourself. :wink:
Cheers, Ava.
Resident witch of LibriVox. "I ain't Nice."

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