Pronunciation help: all languages

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maxgal
Posts: 742
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 14th, 2020, 1:26 pm

maxgal wrote:
August 11th, 2020, 4:56 am
Kitty wrote:
August 11th, 2020, 1:34 am
ok here is the middle English file. https://librivox.org/uploads/kitty/middle_english_maxgal.mp3
poor Joseph is always ranting in these mystery plays that he is a cuckold :lol:

So you can hear, the vowels are most often spoken like the Germanic pronunciation, the shift to modern English pronunciation was not that early. The r can be a bit rolled if you can do it. Final syllables with -e are mostly spoken as well. I hope I didn't speak too fast, but I also wanted to convey a bit the dramatic expressiveness. Then it's easier to understand what is happening here.

Let me know if anything was hard to understand or follow, then I can try to make it slower. If you wish you can upload your version and I can give you feedback :) But as I said before...I'm sure no one will complain: if you stick to a few basic rules already, it will sound quite genuine. ;)

Sonia
O thank you!
I’ll check it out.
... LJB

WOW, it sounds so ferocious! :shock:
I'll try to do it justice.
Thanks very much...LJB :twisted:
Louise
"every little breeze..."

maxgal
Posts: 742
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » September 6th, 2020, 3:18 pm

Kitty wrote:
August 11th, 2020, 1:34 am
ok here is the middle English file. https://librivox.org/uploads/kitty/middle_english_maxgal.mp3
poor Joseph is always ranting in these mystery plays that he is a cuckold :lol:

So you can hear, the vowels are most often spoken like the Germanic pronunciation, the shift to modern English pronunciation was not that early. The r can be a bit rolled if you can do it. Final syllables with -e are mostly spoken as well. I hope I didn't speak too fast, but I also wanted to convey a bit the dramatic expressiveness. Then it's easier to understand what is happening here.

Let me know if anything was hard to understand or follow, then I can try to make it slower. If you wish you can upload your version and I can give you feedback :) But as I said before...I'm sure no one will complain: if you stick to a few basic rules already, it will sound quite genuine. ;)

Sonia
Hi again Sonia,
It worked! ...at least well enough for me to be PL OK'd. :mrgreen:
Here's my attempt to sound like you, at about 14:30-17:00:
https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/christianmythology_01_leatherbee_128kb.mp3
Thanks loads again...LJB
Louise
"every little breeze..."

Kitty
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Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » September 7th, 2020, 2:31 am

maxgal wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 3:18 pm
It worked! ...at least well enough for me to be PL OK'd. :mrgreen:
:shock: :clap: brilliant job, you really could start in the mystery plays any time now ! It sounds quite genuine and you really put in enough emotion and emphasis that it should be understandable even with the more antiquish pronunciation. I think after this short crash course in Middle English, you will have no problem with further excerpts.

Super. And I'm happy I was of help :)

Sonia

Lynnet
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Post by Lynnet » September 7th, 2020, 11:56 am

Request from a reader in The Romance of the Romanoffs:
Would someone please be able to help me with the correct pronunciation of Preobrajenshote? The closest I can find online a pronunciation for "Preobrazhensky" which also seems to appear in later text, but I don't know if those are two separate things or the same with different spellings.
Thank you!
Help us finish:

Charles the Bold by Ruth Putnam 7 sections remaining
Castle of Twilight 6 sections remaining
The Religious Experience of the Roman People 5 sections remaining
A Minor War History 12 sections remaining

Kazbek
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Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » September 8th, 2020, 6:04 am

Lynnet wrote:
September 7th, 2020, 11:56 am
Request from a reader in The Romance of the Romanoffs:
Would someone please be able to help me with the correct pronunciation of Preobrajenshote? The closest I can find online a pronunciation for "Preobrazhensky" which also seems to appear in later text, but I don't know if those are two separate things or the same with different spellings.
Thank you!
That's a rather strange case. The name is Preobrajenskoe (pre-ob-ra-ZHEN-sko-ye). It's one of the most famous village names in Russian history, from which the Preobrazhensky Regiment took its name. Preobrajenshote is obviously wrong, but it appears also in the PDF of the book, repeatedly. It seems that the author misread the name somewhere, and immortalized it in this mangled form. There's no correct way to pronounce it. It doesn't sound like a Russian word at all.

Michael

Lynnet
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Location: In the desert

Post by Lynnet » September 8th, 2020, 7:56 am

Kazbek wrote:
September 8th, 2020, 6:04 am
Lynnet wrote:
September 7th, 2020, 11:56 am
Request from a reader in The Romance of the Romanoffs:
Would someone please be able to help me with the correct pronunciation of Preobrajenshote? The closest I can find online a pronunciation for "Preobrazhensky" which also seems to appear in later text, but I don't know if those are two separate things or the same with different spellings.
Thank you!
That's a rather strange case. The name is Preobrajenskoe (pre-ob-ra-ZHEN-sko-ye). It's one of the most famous village names in Russian history, from which the Preobrazhensky Regiment took its name. Preobrajenshote is obviously wrong, but it appears also in the PDF of the book, repeatedly. It seems that the author misread the name somewhere, and immortalized it in this mangled form. There's no correct way to pronounce it. It doesn't sound like a Russian word at all.

Michael
Thank you.
Help us finish:

Charles the Bold by Ruth Putnam 7 sections remaining
Castle of Twilight 6 sections remaining
The Religious Experience of the Roman People 5 sections remaining
A Minor War History 12 sections remaining

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » September 25th, 2020, 10:14 pm

I need help with Gaelic, please. I have two phrases:

Till an crodh a' Dhonnachaidh

and

Cumhadh an fhir mhoir

My text gives the translation for these, I just need to know the pronunication.

Thanks in advance!

EDIT:

Make that three. I found one in the next chapter as well.

A teanga a' diabhuil mhoir, tha thu ag déanamh breug

clionawoodbyrne
Posts: 23
Joined: June 2nd, 2020, 7:17 am
Location: Ireland

Post by clionawoodbyrne » September 27th, 2020, 3:52 am

mightyfelix wrote:
September 25th, 2020, 10:14 pm
I need help with Gaelic, please. I have two phrases:

Till an crodh a' Dhonnachaidh

and

Cumhadh an fhir mhoir

My text gives the translation for these, I just need to know the pronunication.

Thanks in advance!

EDIT:

Make that three. I found one in the next chapter as well.

A teanga a' diabhuil mhoir, tha thu ag déanamh breug
Hi
Here is phonetic pronouncation.
1. Till un cruh, a Ghunna-cha.
(NB: The 'Gh' sound there is like the hard G in the word Gun, but not as hard. More like an infant gurgling.
And the 'ch' sound is like the 'ch' in Loch Ness or the 'ch' sound in "Och, aye!" Not the 'ch' sound in "church".
If that's too tricky, you could go for
Till un cruh, a Gunna-ka (inaccurate, but close).
2. Coo-wa un ir vo-ir.
3. A chonga, a dee-yul vo-ir. Thaw too egg daynuv brayag

I am trying to get a recording of the above for you from my Irish speaking brother in law. I will upload it if possible. In the meantime see how you get on.
Cheers
Cliona.

clionawoodbyrne
Posts: 23
Joined: June 2nd, 2020, 7:17 am
Location: Ireland

Post by clionawoodbyrne » September 30th, 2020, 3:25 am

clionawoodbyrne wrote:
September 27th, 2020, 3:52 am
mightyfelix wrote:
September 25th, 2020, 10:14 pm
I need help with Gaelic, please. I have two phrases:

Till an crodh a' Dhonnachaidh

and

Cumhadh an fhir mhoir

My text gives the translation for these, I just need to know the pronunication.

Thanks in advance!

EDIT:

Make that three. I found one in the next chapter as well.

A teanga a' diabhuil mhoir, tha thu ag déanamh breug
Hi
Here is phonetic pronouncation.
1. Till un cruh, a Ghunna-cha.
(NB: The 'Gh' sound there is like the hard G in the word Gun, but not as hard. More like an infant gurgling.
And the 'ch' sound is like the 'ch' in Loch Ness or the 'ch' sound in "Och, aye!" Not the 'ch' sound in "church".
If that's too tricky, you could go for
Till un cruh, a Gunna-ka (inaccurate, but close).
2. Coo-wa un ir vo-ir.
3. A chonga, a dee-yul vo-ir. Thaw too egg daynuv brayag

I am trying to get a recording of the above for you from my Irish speaking brother in law. I will upload it if possible. In the meantime see how you get on.
Cheers
Cliona.
Hi Devorah

Here is the sound bite of how to say the words. I am not sure of the sound quality but give it a go.

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/pronouncation_1.mp3

Cheers
Cliona

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » September 30th, 2020, 6:01 am

Thank you so much, Cliona! This will be a big help! I may upload my own attempt, when I get the chance, if you wouldn't mind providing feedback on it. :D

maxgal
Posts: 742
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » October 2nd, 2020, 11:18 am

HELP!

Can anyone help me with the following lines of dialogue from Part IV of "The Beckoning Fair One" by Oliver Onions?
They are spoken by Mrs. Barrett, an elderly working class woman from Merionethshire, Wales.
The spellings and hyphenations of various words, apparently indicating elements of her accent, are exactly as written.
Thanks very much!
...LJB

De-ar me! But that will be a very o-ald tune, Mr. Oleron! I will not have heard it this for-ty years!
The tune, indeed, that you was humming, sir.
I have no voice for singing, Mr. Oleron; it was Ann Pugh was the singer of our family...
...but the tune will be very o-ald, and it is called 'The Beckoning Fair One.'
They do say it was sung to a harp, Mr. Oleron, and it will be very o-ald.
Indeed you wass. I would not be likely to tell you lies.
Louise
"every little breeze..."

Lynnet
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Post by Lynnet » October 2nd, 2020, 12:32 pm

maxgal wrote:
October 2nd, 2020, 11:18 am
HELP!

Can anyone help me with the following lines of dialogue from Part IV of "The Beckoning Fair One" by Oliver Onions?
They are spoken by Mrs. Barrett, an elderly working class woman from Merionethshire, Wales.
The spellings and hyphenations of various words, apparently indicating elements of her accent, are exactly as written.
Thanks very much!
...LJB

De-ar me! But that will be a very o-ald tune, Mr. Oleron! I will not have heard it this for-ty years!
The tune, indeed, that you was humming, sir.
I have no voice for singing, Mr. Oleron; it was Ann Pugh was the singer of our family...
...but the tune will be very o-ald, and it is called 'The Beckoning Fair One.'
They do say it was sung to a harp, Mr. Oleron, and it will be very o-ald.
Indeed you wass. I would not be likely to tell you lies.
That’s a very accurate representation of the accent.
Dee are me
Owe wold
Fore tee
W-are-z

It’s a very sing-song accent and words are drawn out.
(They also add “isn’t it?” To the end of every sentence. “How are you feeling today, isn’t it?”... we lived there 7 years and I didn’t pick up that habit :lol: )
Help us finish:

Charles the Bold by Ruth Putnam 7 sections remaining
Castle of Twilight 6 sections remaining
The Religious Experience of the Roman People 5 sections remaining
A Minor War History 12 sections remaining

maxgal
Posts: 742
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » October 2nd, 2020, 12:53 pm

Lynnet wrote:
October 2nd, 2020, 12:32 pm
maxgal wrote:
October 2nd, 2020, 11:18 am
HELP!

Can anyone help me with the following lines of dialogue from Part IV of "The Beckoning Fair One" by Oliver Onions?
They are spoken by Mrs. Barrett, an elderly working class woman from Merionethshire, Wales.
The spellings and hyphenations of various words, apparently indicating elements of her accent, are exactly as written.
Thanks very much!
...LJB

De-ar me! But that will be a very o-ald tune, Mr. Oleron! I will not have heard it this for-ty years!
The tune, indeed, that you was humming, sir.
I have no voice for singing, Mr. Oleron; it was Ann Pugh was the singer of our family...
...but the tune will be very o-ald, and it is called 'The Beckoning Fair One.'
They do say it was sung to a harp, Mr. Oleron, and it will be very o-ald.
Indeed you wass. I would not be likely to tell you lies.
That’s a very accurate representation of the accent.
Dee are me
Owe wold
Fore tee
W-are-z

It’s a very sing-song accent and words are drawn out.
(They also add “isn’t it?” To the end of every sentence. “How are you feeling today, isn’t it?”... we lived there 7 years and I didn’t pick up that habit :lol: )
AH.
That helps, thank you!
What about the lines overall?
Can you (or anyone) give me a sort-of-specific idea how it all might sound?
I'm pretty pathetic at accents; I don't know how much I can do without mangling it, but I'd like to give it a shot.
Louise
"every little breeze..."

Peter Why
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Joined: November 24th, 2005, 3:54 am
Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)

Post by Peter Why » October 2nd, 2020, 6:26 pm

The difficulty with the Welsh accent is not in the pronunciation of the individual words but with the overall variation in tone through each sentence. It's been called "musical". There are some quite a good videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cq-mEejECcU and here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gb8Bps3bG84 The last one has different Welsh speakers giving examples of vowel sounds.

It's worth waiting for a Librivox helper who has more experience, though.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

mightyfelix
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Joined: August 7th, 2016, 6:39 pm

Post by mightyfelix » October 2nd, 2020, 9:52 pm

clionawoodbyrne wrote:
September 30th, 2020, 3:25 am
clionawoodbyrne wrote:
September 27th, 2020, 3:52 am
mightyfelix wrote:
September 25th, 2020, 10:14 pm
I need help with Gaelic, please. I have two phrases:

Till an crodh a' Dhonnachaidh

and

Cumhadh an fhir mhoir

My text gives the translation for these, I just need to know the pronunication.

Thanks in advance!

EDIT:

Make that three. I found one in the next chapter as well.

A teanga a' diabhuil mhoir, tha thu ag déanamh breug
Hi
Here is phonetic pronouncation.
1. Till un cruh, a Ghunna-cha.
(NB: The 'Gh' sound there is like the hard G in the word Gun, but not as hard. More like an infant gurgling.
And the 'ch' sound is like the 'ch' in Loch Ness or the 'ch' sound in "Och, aye!" Not the 'ch' sound in "church".
If that's too tricky, you could go for
Till un cruh, a Gunna-ka (inaccurate, but close).
2. Coo-wa un ir vo-ir.
3. A chonga, a dee-yul vo-ir. Thaw too egg daynuv brayag

I am trying to get a recording of the above for you from my Irish speaking brother in law. I will upload it if possible. In the meantime see how you get on.
Cheers
Cliona.
Hi Devorah

Here is the sound bite of how to say the words. I am not sure of the sound quality but give it a go.

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/pronouncation_1.mp3

Cheers
Cliona
I went ahead and recorded my chapters, giving it my best go. But if you have the time and the inclination to double check my attempts, I have uploaded them here (with a bit of context around them from the chapters).

https://librivox.org/uploads/xx-nonproject/malcolm_gaelicsample.mp3

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