Pronunciation help: all languages

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Kazbek
Posts: 990
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » June 1st, 2020, 4:43 pm

I recently came across an "Accents Table" on the LV wiki, where readers could identify their own accents. It seems to belong to the halcyon days before spammers forced the community to restrict access to the wiki, and I doubt this method would scale to the LV of our times, with over 10K readers. We also have a couple of volumes of "Celebration of Dialects and Accents" in the catalog, where readers demonstrated their accents on the same short text. One can always check what accent is used in a recording before listening to the whole thing, or if the reader adopts different accents for different characters. The idea of reading in the same accent as the author is a bit forced for the texts we read here, because accents and general manner of speaking have changed significantly over the last 100 years, in some languages more than others, and generally became homogenized by mass media. I enjoy hearing old recordings of famous authors speaking in part because of how strange their voices usually sound to our ear.

Michael

Darvinia
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 3114
Joined: March 15th, 2009, 8:38 pm
Location: Alberta, Canada

Post by Darvinia » June 2nd, 2020, 10:22 am

I grew up in both England and Canada. When I'm in England now I'm told I have a Canadian accent. When I'm in Canada I'm asked if I'm from England. :hmm: It stems from expectation and perception.

Also, there is a variety of both Canadian and English accents. I have no idea how to identify mine.
Bev

"I yam what I yam, and that's all what I yam." - Popeye, the sailor man
"Everybody's got a mountain to climb" - Dickey Betts
12696

Penumbra
Posts: 1155
Joined: May 10th, 2016, 6:16 pm

Post by Penumbra » June 2nd, 2020, 12:05 pm

My sister grew up in Dallas Tx and consequently had the accent you'd expect from Dallas. She married a Brit and moved to London, and she purposely changed her accent to sound more "British" so her kids would hear something closer to normal for them. She says none of her British friends thinks she is British, but they also don't believe she is from Dallas. The most common country-of-origin guesses are Canada and South Africa.
Tom Penn

dvandervis
Posts: 22
Joined: February 24th, 2020, 1:06 pm
Location: Winnipeg, Canada

Post by dvandervis » June 10th, 2020, 6:55 pm

Some help with Latin? I've got a name

AEbutius Liberalis

Ay-BUTT-ee-us

or Ay-BOOT-ee-us? Or am I messing it up both ways?
Diana V.

Constructive criticism is always welcome. Do I need to slow down? How's my enunciation? Did I stumble, or pause too long? Please let me know!

Kazbek
Posts: 990
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » June 10th, 2020, 7:31 pm

dvandervis wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 6:55 pm
Some help with Latin? I've got a name

AEbutius Liberalis

Ay-BUTT-ee-us

or Ay-BOOT-ee-us? Or am I messing it up both ways?
If the name appears in a classical context (I'm guessing this has to do with Seneca), I would use the classical pronunciation: eye-BOOT-ee-us.

Michael

AnaNaumoska
Posts: 31
Joined: June 17th, 2020, 3:57 am
Location: Struga, North Macedonia

Post by AnaNaumoska » June 21st, 2020, 1:20 pm

Hello everyone, I stuck with a particular phrase in latin, that I have no idea how to pronounce.
""Nbn tamquam amicus videt sed tamquam imperator".

Any help is welcome (and necessary) :)

Have a great evening,
Ana 8-)

Kazbek
Posts: 990
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » June 21st, 2020, 5:39 pm

AnaNaumoska wrote:
June 21st, 2020, 1:20 pm
Hello everyone, I stuck with a particular phrase in latin, that I have no idea how to pronounce.
""Nbn tamquam amicus videt sed tamquam imperator".

Any help is welcome (and necessary) :)

Have a great evening,
Hi, Ana. "Nbn" is a typo for "non". Can I transliterate the phrase in Cyrillic? It's easier than using English syllables.

нон тАмквам амИкус вИдет сед тАмквам имперАтор

Michael
P.S. I googled this phrase and see that it appears in a footnote that justifies an unorthodox translation of Seneca. The more common reading goes "quia me non tamquam amicum videt, sed tamquam imperatorem", with accusative case endings, and meaning "because he sees me not as [he sees] a friend, but as [he does] an emperor", while this translator reads both words in the nominative case. More information than you asked for. :mrgreen:

AnaNaumoska
Posts: 31
Joined: June 17th, 2020, 3:57 am
Location: Struga, North Macedonia

Post by AnaNaumoska » June 21st, 2020, 11:07 pm

Kazbek wrote:
June 21st, 2020, 5:39 pm
AnaNaumoska wrote:
June 21st, 2020, 1:20 pm
Hello everyone, I stuck with a particular phrase in latin, that I have no idea how to pronounce.
""Nbn tamquam amicus videt sed tamquam imperator".

Any help is welcome (and necessary) :)

Have a great evening,
Hi, Ana. "Nbn" is a typo for "non". Can I transliterate the phrase in Cyrillic? It's easier than using English syllables.

нон тАмквам амИкус вИдет сед тАмквам имперАтор

Michael
P.S. I googled this phrase and see that it appears in a footnote that justifies an unorthodox translation of Seneca. The more common reading goes "quia me non tamquam amicum videt, sed tamquam imperatorem", with accusative case endings, and meaning "because he sees me not as [he sees] a friend, but as [he does] an emperor", while this translator reads both words in the nominative case. More information than you asked for. :mrgreen:

Awesomee! Thanks a lot Michael!
And yes, it's in Seneca's On Benefits.
Ana 8-)

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