Pronunciation help: all languages

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Kitty
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Post by Kitty » March 11th, 2018, 8:19 am

SabellaDunne wrote:
March 11th, 2018, 5:45 am
The book I'm currently reading for has a sentence in French, I was wondering if anyone could help me with the cadence and pronunciation?
"Pour la populace ce n'est jamais par envie d'attaquer qu'elle se soulčve, mais par impatience de souffrir."
hi Sabella, I recorded the sentence for you, first almost word for word, so you hear the specific pronunciation of each word, then more fluently twice, so you hear the cadence better. :)

https://librivox.org/uploads/xx-nonproject/french_for_sabella.mp3

In case you want to know what it means: (word for word) For the people, it is never because of their desire to attack that they are rebelling, but because of their impatience to suffer. --> in better English: The people would never rebel because they want to attack, but because they are impatient to suffer. A sad statement, in a way. :(

Oh by the way, there is a typo: it's "soulève" with an è in the middle, not "soulčve"

Hope it helps. I can check your pronunciation later on, if you wish :) Good luck.

Sonia

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » March 12th, 2018, 2:11 am

Just a little one: could someone help with the local pronunciation of "Shrewsbury" in New Jersey, please? "Shrow", "Shrew" ? or even something idiosyncratic. I'm very aware how difficult "Leicester", "Marylebone" and many other place names in England are difficult for non-Brits.

Peter
"Anyone who believes that exponential growth can go on forever in a finite world is either a madman or an economist." Kenneth Boulding, 1973

tovarisch
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Post by tovarisch » March 12th, 2018, 5:17 am

The town here in NE is pronounced "SHROOZ-bury". I would think that NJ town is the same...

When I want to check the local pronunciation of a place, I search for videos that include that name. See if you can find some relevant among these results.
tovarisch
  • reality prompts me to scale down my reading, sorry to say
    to PLers: do correct my pronunciation please

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » March 12th, 2018, 5:26 am

Thanks, tovarisch, SHREW zbury it is. The Shrewsbury Rocks confirmed it ... the home viewing was remarkably irritating ... how much money must these people have?
Peter
"Anyone who believes that exponential growth can go on forever in a finite world is either a madman or an economist." Kenneth Boulding, 1973

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » March 15th, 2018, 6:29 pm

Some more from me, with surrounding context this time.
"Oh, you needn't be anxious about her," Dr. Galbraith replied, looking full at him with sympathy and affection in his kind gray eyes. "She has no vice in her whatever, and not a trace of hysteria. Her talk is mere exuberance of intellect."

"I don't know," her uncle answered. "Qui peut tout dire arrive ŕ tout faire, you know."
And then one rather shorter. I'm sure I could Google this one easily, but since I'm here.... :)
The choir had been singing O Salutaris, Hostia! at the conclusion of which everybody was startled by a senile cheer from the stalls. The duke had dosed off into a dream of the opera, and had awakened suddenly, under the impression that a wooden image of the Blessed Virgin opposite had just completed a lovely solo, and was unexpectedly following it up by an audacious pas seul.

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » March 16th, 2018, 12:54 am

Hi Devorah, if you still have time, and if nobody posts before me, I can record it this evening.
Qui peut tout dire arrive ŕ tout faire
there is a typo, this strange ŕ should be an à. At least I can tell you already what it means: "Who is capable of saying it all, will manage to do it all." In context I guess he probably means one should beware of her, even though she looks harmless, she may have it in her to act upon her speeches. Does that make sense in the text ? I don't know the book, so can only guess by your one sentence.
following it up by an audacious pas seul.
this means "solo step". It is a term from the ballet. You may be familiar with the more famous "pas de deux" (step by two) which is when the two dancers perform in harmony. Well, the "pas seul" is when the ballerina is doing a solo.

Sonia

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » March 16th, 2018, 9:39 am

so Devorah, here is your sound file, with the needed expressiveness and in slow-motion ;)

https://librivox.org/uploads/xx-nonproject/french-for-devorah.mp3

hope it helps :D

Sonia

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » March 17th, 2018, 8:28 pm

Kitty wrote:
March 16th, 2018, 12:54 am
Hi Devorah, if you still have time, and if nobody posts before me, I can record it this evening.
Qui peut tout dire arrive ŕ tout faire
there is a typo, this strange ŕ should be an à. At least I can tell you already what it means: "Who is capable of saying it all, will manage to do it all." In context I guess he probably means one should beware of her, even though she looks harmless, she may have it in her to act upon her speeches. Does that make sense in the text ? I don't know the book, so can only guess by your one sentence.
following it up by an audacious pas seul.
this means "solo step". It is a term from the ballet. You may be familiar with the more famous "pas de deux" (step by two) which is when the two dancers perform in harmony. Well, the "pas seul" is when the ballerina is doing a solo.

Sonia
Thanks so much. I thought that might have been a typo. And yes, the girl in question is certainly one of whom to beware!

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » May 3rd, 2018, 3:50 pm

Came across this unexpectedly today:
Magazin zum Gebrauche der Staaten Kirche Geschichte
German, I guess? :?:

Then, while skimming ahead, I also found:
...he sent a troop of soldiers, who broke over the walls, and carried her away vi et armis.
and
All the inferior clergy, animated by the esprit du corps, took up the question...
Not German. French?

I'd appreciate some :help:, especially with the first one.

pschempf
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Post by pschempf » May 3rd, 2018, 5:09 pm

Magazin zum Gebrauche der Staaten Kirche Geschichte - German
Magazine of Materials for a History of a State Church
Maybe Ava can offer a correct pronunciation or if you're desperate you could try Google Translate :)

vi et armis - Latin. Definition and pronunciation here -
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vi%20et%20armis

esprit du corps - French? I thought it was "esprit de corps". Definition and pronunciation for that here -
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/esprit%20de%20corps
Fritz

"A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labors of a spasmodic Hercules."

Trollope

moniaqua
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Post by moniaqua » May 5th, 2018, 4:10 am

Sorry that I didn't see that earlier.

Yes,
Magazin zum Gebrauche der Staaten Kirche Geschichte
is German. Grammar is strange though, are those headers?

I just recorded it, will upload it in a couple of minutes :)

And here we go:
https://librivox.org/uploads/xx-nonproject/magazin.mp3

I paused between "Magazin zum Gebrauche der Staaten", "Kirche" and "Geschichte". Tell me if it's too fast, please.

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » May 5th, 2018, 10:06 am

Thank you. I'll try my best. I never took German, and some of the sounds don't come naturally to me. If it was Spanish, I'd feel so much more comfortable! :roll:

moniaqua
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Post by moniaqua » May 5th, 2018, 11:02 am

mightyfelix wrote:
May 5th, 2018, 10:06 am
I never took German,
Ok, so I slowed it down a bit more. You do not need to roll the r's that much, but if you feel comfortable with Spanish, you might enjoy it ;) It's not that far away anyway ;)

https://librivox.org/uploads/xx-nonproject/magazin_2.mp3

I am sure you'll do just fine. You speak French also nicely. Just think of German as harsh Spanish :)

msfry
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Post by msfry » June 17th, 2018, 10:39 am

Can anyone help me figure how to read these lines, each one symbolizes a Southern US newspaper advertisement from the 1850's.

Dadeville, Sept. 1, 1852. 1tf
Monroe, Feb. 17, 1852. 15–3m
Dec. 21. 53 ‡tds.
Terms, &c. &c.
Nov. 11 30 x3
Nov. 20 37 †xtf
Nov. 5-dly.
Sept. 13, 1852. twtf (J)

I can't find anything online, so any help would be appreciated.
Michele Fry, CC
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"Knowing that a tomato is actually a fruit is Knowledge. Wisdom is not putting one in a fruit salad."
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msfry
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Post by msfry » June 20th, 2018, 3:10 pm

Ah, and now this French sentence -- an advertisement for negro slaves back in 1852. Any help much appreciated.

Wm. F. Tannehill & Co. ont constamment en mains un assortiment complet d’ESCLAVES bien choisis A VENDRE. Aussi, vente et achat d’esclaves par commission.
Nous avons actuellement en mains un grand nombre de NEGRES à louer aux mois, parmi lesquels se trouvent des jeunes garcons, domestiques de maison, cuisinières, blanchisseuses et repasseuses, nourices, etc.
Michele Fry, CC
My Projects
"Knowing that a tomato is actually a fruit is Knowledge. Wisdom is not putting one in a fruit salad."
.

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