I need help with Latin please!

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dread
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Post by dread » July 5th, 2015, 7:36 am

tovarisch wrote:I think it's caedit (Not 'coedi'), so do check; it makes no sense with 'coedi', so if the expression is
"Nec pluteum caedit, nec demorsos sapit ungues", the pronunciation is something like

neck PLOO-teh-oom KAY-dit, neck deh-MOR-sos SAH-pit OON-qwess
Thank you!
The range of literature is as wide as humanity. It touches every feeling, every hope, every craving of the human heart. -- David Jordan

tovarisch
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Post by tovarisch » July 5th, 2015, 8:06 am

Sorry... I mistyped the 'ungues' with a Q. Ought to be 'OON-gwess' .
tovarisch
  • reality prompts me to scale down my reading, sorry to say
    to PLers: do correct my pronunciation please

RuthieG
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Post by RuthieG » July 5th, 2015, 8:18 am

Yes, it is caedit - it's not printed very well.
https://archive.org/stream/essaysselectedfr00johnuoft#page/173/mode/1up

Ruth
My LV catalogue page | RuthieG's CataBlog of recordings | Tweet: @RuthGolding

msfry
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Post by msfry » July 22nd, 2015, 8:53 am

Could someone skilled in Latin pronounce these phrases for the first half of my Cotton Mather project, citing each section as shown. Upload to TriciaG, and I'll post a link to it in the First Post on this project: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=57240 This takes me about half way through scanning the book. My eyes need a break before I continue! :shock:

Section 3. Sed Venient Annis Sæculæ Seris

Section 5. Quid mihi Opus, est eum tentare, quem Novissimo die, Jure Optimo, sum possessurus?

Section 6. O misera & miseranda Conditio!

Section 10.
O Beata Apocalypsis; quam bene mecum agitur, qui tecum Comburar!
and
Tot Sacramenta quot verba

Section 11. Deo permittente, Terræ motus causat.

Section 14. Concurrite Cives, Dilapsa sunt vestra Mœnia!
Michele Fry, CC
"There is no frigate like a book to take us lands away, Nor any coursers like a page of prancing poetry." ~ Emily Dickinson

Love Stories #3

TND1
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Post by TND1 » August 30th, 2015, 11:45 am

Could anyone offer a suggestion as to how "Armgri et Dna" in section 1 should be pronounced in latin, please?

I cannot find any reference to the word "Armgri" and "Dna" looks as if it could be an abbreviation.

I'm fairly certain that I've sorted the rest of the sections including the typos - so they're OK!

Image

Thanks

TND

tovarisch
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Post by tovarisch » August 30th, 2015, 2:50 pm

The "Dna" (with the tilde over 'n') is the abbreviation for "Domina", most likely. "Armgri" is likely the name of some important person.

"Aramagri (or Aramagiri or something else, we can only guess) et Domina Sui maneri" - "Aramagri and his Lady of the Manor". Does it give you any clue? I hope so.
tovarisch
  • reality prompts me to scale down my reading, sorry to say
    to PLers: do correct my pronunciation please

barbara2
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Post by barbara2 » August 31st, 2015, 12:02 am

tovarisch wrote:The "Dna" (with the tilde over 'n') is the abbreviation for "Domina", most likely. "Armgri" is likely the name of some important person.

"Aramagri (or Aramagiri or something else, we can only guess) et Domina Sui maneri" - "Aramagri and his Lady of the Manor". Does it give you any clue? I hope so.

Or would"Armgri" be the short form of the genitive masculine singular of amiger (in this case, I suppose, "knight") - armigeri? There is a tilde over Armgri too.

Unconfidently,

Barbara

TND1
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Joined: January 23rd, 2014, 2:38 pm

Post by TND1 » August 31st, 2015, 2:40 am

tovarisch wrote:The "Dna" (with the tilde over 'n') is the abbreviation for "Domina", most likely. "Armgri" is likely the name of some important person.

"Aramagri (or Aramagiri or something else, we can only guess) et Domina Sui maneri" - "Aramagri and his Lady of the Manor". Does it give you any clue? I hope so.
barbara2 wrote: Or would"Armgri" be the short form of the genitive masculine singular of amiger (in this case, I suppose, "knight") - armigeri? There is a tilde over Armgri too.

Unconfidently,

Barbara
Thank you Tovarisch & Barbara for your suggestions.

I think that I'll go with: "Armigeri et Domina Sui Maneri". It seems that this part of the dedication on the bell referred to the Lord and Lady of the Manor.

Henry Holdich (also recorded in the dedication), was a minor nobleman in Ranworth, Norfolk at that time.

Cheers

TND

Roger
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Post by Roger » September 25th, 2015, 10:17 am

Is there someone who would be kind enough to provide a Latin .mp3 for me, for an upcoming solo?
I do not need it translated, as the book translates it at a later point. If my assistant would benefit from the translation, please just let me know, I'd be glad to provide.
There is no rush at all for this, as it will be quite a while before I get around to requiring it.
Here are the phrases I need to read. I know no Latin whatsoever, so a reading which I can reproduce would be most helpful (hence the .mp3 request):

Liber IV, Epigram XVIII

Qua vicina pluit Vipsanis porta columnis
Et madet assiduo lubricus imbre lapis,
In iugulum pueri, qui roscida tecta subibat,
Decidit hiberno praegravis unda gelu:
Cumque peregisset miseri crudelia fata,
Tabuit in calido vulnere mucro tener.
Quid non saeva sibi voluit Fortuna licere?
Aut ubi non mors est, si iugulatis aquae?

I would be most grateful if someone could assist with this. Thank you in advance.
-- Roger .... pushing on the door of life marked "pull"

Roger
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Location: U.S.

Post by Roger » November 3rd, 2015, 7:07 am

Thank you to whomever moved this to the proper location. I was not aware of the singular category, and do apologize for my oversight.
If there becomes a 'taker' for this request, I would be glad to cut/paste the uploaded file into the project and give due credit to the reader, which I would do either way, if desired.
-- Roger .... pushing on the door of life marked "pull"

WoollyBee
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Post by WoollyBee » November 13th, 2015, 7:43 am

I could probably read this. I have been studying Latin for a while, and I am very confident with pronunciation. I can't promise it will all be right, though! :)

Roger
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Location: U.S.

Post by Roger » November 14th, 2015, 6:28 am

Thank you Sarah! Let me know if you prefer me to insert your recording into the solo, and I will give you credit (if you wish).
Or I could do the reading myself, using your pronunciation and enunciation as a guide.
Either way is fine with me. :)
Thank you so much!
-- Roger .... pushing on the door of life marked "pull"

smike
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Location: Germany

Post by smike » December 14th, 2015, 8:35 am

There are Latin abbreviations in the Cotton Mather project mentioned above -- and there are digits. Who can help me with the following:
Efficiunt Dæmones, ut quæ non sunt, sic tamen, quasi sint, conspicienda hominibus exhibeant. Lactantius Lib. 2. Instit. Cap. 15. Diabolus Consulitur, cum iis mediis utimur aliquid Cognoscendi, quæ a Diabolo sunt introducta. Ames Cas. Cons. L. 4. Cap. 23.
Claudia

So much to do, so little time...

Roger
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Location: U.S.

Post by Roger » February 13th, 2016, 7:19 am

I'm still looking for some assistance with pronunciation of this brief Latin phrase:

Liber IV, Epigram XVIII

Qua vicina pluit Vipsanis porta columnis
Et madet assiduo lubricus imbre lapis,
In iugulum pueri, qui roscida tecta subibat,
Decidit hiberno praegravis unda gelu:
Cumque peregisset miseri crudelia fata,
Tabuit in calido vulnere mucro tener.
Quid non saeva sibi voluit Fortuna licere?
Aut ubi non mors est, si iugulatis aquae?

Can anyone help? I'm on last chapter of book which is waiting to be cataloged pending this quote.
Would prefer a recording which I will do my best to duplicate. If it helps, here is the supposed translation to English:

Book IV, Epigram 18

On a youth killed by the fall of a piece of ice.

Just where the gate near the portico of Agrippa is always dripping with water, and the slippery pavement is wet with constant showers, a mass of water, congealed by winter’s cold, fell upon the neck of a youth who was entering the damp temple, and, when it had inflicted a cruel death on the unfortunate boy, the weapon melted in the warm wound it had made. What cruelties does not Fortune permit? Or where is not death to be found, if you, the waters, turn cut-throats.

Thanks!
-- Roger .... pushing on the door of life marked "pull"

tony123
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Post by tony123 » February 14th, 2016, 3:44 pm

Roger,

Do you still need a recording for the Latin just above? I'll make you one if you do. You can repeat it or use the recording itself, whichever you prefer.

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