I need help with Latin please!

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katetastrophe
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Joined: January 8th, 2014, 5:38 pm

Post by katetastrophe » March 30th, 2014, 6:24 am

hi all,

in southern arabia, i've come across a latin quote by pliny that i don't want to butcher. any pronunciation help would be most appreciated. with your permission, i will just insert your pronunciation into the file.

the line is:

'In medio Arabiae fere sunt Adramitae pagus Saboraeum in monte excelso'

thank you,
kate

Raaf
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Location: Netherlands

Post by Raaf » April 4th, 2014, 12:53 am

I won't be able to 'tape' the latin quote for you today, but tomorrow I will. In the mean time here are some tips: the 'e' in medio is pronunciated as the 'ay' in okay. 'ae' is pronunciated as the 'ye' in bye. The 'g' is like the 'g' in good.
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Raaf
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Post by Raaf » April 5th, 2014, 12:49 am

Here it is: click!
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katetastrophe
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Post by katetastrophe » May 17th, 2014, 4:39 pm

you're the best, thanks! how would you like to be credited on the recording? and if it's your screen name, how would i pronounce that?)

kate

Raaf
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Post by Raaf » May 26th, 2014, 2:41 am

No credits needed. ^^
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katetastrophe
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Post by katetastrophe » May 28th, 2014, 4:27 pm

ok. thank you very much. if you change your mind, i'll be glad to modify the recording.

mwainer
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Joined: April 7th, 2014, 3:17 pm

Post by mwainer » June 1st, 2014, 4:44 pm

Hi Folks,

I need help pronouncing a Latin passage:
Compare Tacitus's description of the night engagement in the civil war between Vespasian and Vitellius: "Neutro inclinaverat fortuna, donec adulta nocte, LUNA OSTENDERET ACIES, FALERESQUE"
If someone could make a recording of the Latin phrase, I could either insert it into my recording or use it to learn the line well enough to parrot it back into my recording.

(And why are the last four words in all caps? Is he shouting?)

Max

mwainer
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Post by mwainer » June 3rd, 2014, 3:07 pm

Hi,

This is to let y'all know that I found someone locally to help me with the pronunciation of the Latin phrase. Thanks anyway.

Max

Merione
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Joined: June 11th, 2014, 2:01 pm

Post by Merione » June 17th, 2014, 11:29 am

Hi, I need to read some poems in Latin and I have a doubt. I don't need help with the pronunciation, because I study Latin at school, but my doubt is about WHICH pronunciation to use. I'm Italian and at school I've learned the "Church" pronunciation, that's the more common here, but I know that there are at least three other different pronunciations. Which one should I use in my Latin recordings? Thank you :)

tovarisch
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Post by tovarisch » June 17th, 2014, 11:52 am

Merione wrote:Hi, I need to read some poems in Latin and I have a doubt. I don't need help with the pronunciation, because I study Latin at school, but my doubt is about WHICH pronunciation to use. I'm Italian and at school I've learned the "Church" pronunciation, that's the more common here, but I know that there are at least three other different pronunciations. Which one should I use in my Latin recordings? Thank you :)
That's simple: record in all of them. One of them is bound to be very close to correct. Let the listeners decide which one they want to hear...

Alternative is more complicated: try to figure out which pronunciation is the right one if the poem sounds different. I think rhyme is one of the tool linguists use to find out how things were/are pronounced in a language, so you're in luck if you have poems with rhyme and rhythm.

Good luck!
tovarisch
  • reality prompts me to scale down my reading, sorry to say
    to PLers: do correct my pronunciation please

Merione
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Joined: June 11th, 2014, 2:01 pm

Post by Merione » June 17th, 2014, 12:16 pm

Hi tovarisch, thank you for your answer. I think that I'll record in all of them, even if I'm not used to those pronunciations and it will require more effort. Unfortunately your second alternative is not possible with Latin, because rhyme was not so common as today in Latin poetry...

Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » June 17th, 2014, 12:39 pm

You may choose the pronunciation you want and are more comfortable with, especially if it is for a solo project or a personal selection in a collection. In case of a group project, you can also ask if the book coordinator has a preference, but the more likely answer is "whichever you prefer" :D
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Leni
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Post by Leni » June 18th, 2014, 2:55 pm

Many people prefer to use the Italianate pronunciation for texts written when that pronunciation was historically accurate (that is, Medieval/Renascentist works), and use the Classical for works from Antiquity. But,as Rapunzelina said, it is really up to you. If you want to use the Italianate, because you are more comfortable with it, I see no problem, really. I think what is most important is consistency, that is, not to mix up pronunciations in the same recording. :)
Leni
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TimoleonWash
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Post by TimoleonWash » June 19th, 2014, 7:26 pm

There are many "valid" ways to pronounce Latin and they differ only in their vowel set.

When I speak Latin I use the Spanish vowels: A, E, I, O, U becomes AH, A, E, O, U so you can simply replace the vowels in the Latin with this Spanish set.

Any of the Romance Language vowel sets are technically correct; Spanish, Italian, French, etc... because as Latin is a "dead" language, no living soul knows how the ancients pronounced it. As Latin was dying the Romance languages were born; each of these romantics :D began pronouncing Latin with their own vowels which lead to the situation today.
Last edited by TimoleonWash on June 19th, 2014, 10:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Leni
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Post by Leni » June 19th, 2014, 10:09 pm

Not trying to create more confusion, but the difference is not only in the vowel set. There are a few differences in other letters/groups, such as the TI (pronounced "tsee" in Ecclesiastical and "tih" in Classical), the C ("ch"in ecclesiastical depending on the position, "k"in classical) or consonant + H, as well as in the diphthongs of course (AE, OE etc.).

True, there is no one who knows for sure how Latin was pronounced in Classical times, but there are people who have good solid hypotheses, based on a lot of research, to tell us how things most likely were. For example, I have seen no hypothesis affirming the French vowel set was used at any point by Ancient Romans. We know that the Italianate pronunciation was in fact used, not by Ancient Romans, but by Europeans of many nationalities in the 16th century. Based on things like that, there are more or less accepted ways of pronouncing Latin.

Surely, people are free to use any pronunciation they prefer, even non-accepted ones, and of course everybody has an accent when speaking Latin. But I would still recommend choosing one pronunciation and sticking with it, so as to follow all its established rules, if for no other reason, for the sake of communication - it does get a bit difficult to follow a reading or conversation if the person mixes the pronunciation often. At least that is my experience. :?
Leni
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