Dialogues and Plays

Post your questions & get help from friendly LibriVoxers
Post Reply
Amy
Posts: 1
Joined: February 27th, 2006, 5:47 pm

Post by Amy » March 27th, 2006, 1:09 pm

I am interested in recording a Platonic dialogue.

Has anyone ever tried this? (From the catalogue, it doesn't look like it.) I'm thinking these works are best done as a team, with a different voice for each speaker, rather than one reader who has to say the speakers name every time, or assume the listener can figure it out. Any problems with this, or thoughts about it?

Update: I see the "Importance of Being Earnest" group is going to record voices and then try to splice... I'll keep myself posted on that :)
--
Amy

Aldark
Posts: 158
Joined: January 11th, 2006, 1:08 pm
Location: Dayton, Ohio

Post by Aldark » March 27th, 2006, 1:31 pm

Amy - while I'm not part of a group w/ many voices I wouldn't mind looking into that at some point. It actually crossed my mind during lunch today.

cberrius
Posts: 17
Joined: March 7th, 2006, 2:58 pm

Post by cberrius » March 27th, 2006, 4:44 pm

Plato as actual dialogue is a great (no, fantastic) idea, and I'd be happy to collaborate.

Only the dimmest idea of how to actually do it. Splicing audio would presumably work. It might be interesting to try Skype and see how poor the audio quality is. But maybe the Earnest group have already had that conversation.

Berry

ChipDoc
Posts: 1236
Joined: January 4th, 2006, 3:11 am
Location: Tampa, FL
Contact:

Post by ChipDoc » March 27th, 2006, 5:16 pm

Just make up the sound files with each of you playing a part, then post them and I'll take care of editing them together. I've already got all the tools, so the technical side of it shouldn't be a big deal. Just leave a few seconds of space between the parts. Sounds like a great project!

Here's a recording I made of John Of Gaunt's part in Richard II as an example:
http://ChipDoc.com/LibriVox/richard_ii_gaunt_act1_shakespeare.mp3
6.54Mb/7:09
-Chip
[url]http://ChipDoc.com/LibriVox/[/url]
[i]The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them.[/i]
~Mark Twain

Post Reply