LV Community Podcast 125: Multilingual Performances - Part 2

Non-reading activities need your help too!
bobgon55
Posts: 928
Joined: May 24th, 2011, 8:30 am
Location: Tampa, Florida USA
Contact:

Post by bobgon55 » February 17th, 2012, 11:03 pm

Podcast #125, part two on multilingual performances, will be released next Sunday, Feb 26, 2012. Until then, enjoy podcast #124, just released (at the moment, only available on this thread on this forum).

At present, I have about 25 minutes of material for podcast #125, sufficient alone for a podcast. But if you wish to contribute something about recording in more than one language, please feel free to post or PM with a query or an audio file for the show. YOu may also contribute anything relevant to LibriVox: a promo for your project, some helpful hint(s) on recording or any LV process, or some bit of news relevant to LV.

Thanks to all who contribute and listen.

Bob
Bob Gonzalez
Rhapsodize
A Classic Poetry Performance Initiative
My LibriVox Recordings

bobgon55
Posts: 928
Joined: May 24th, 2011, 8:30 am
Location: Tampa, Florida USA
Contact:

Post by bobgon55 » February 25th, 2012, 4:03 am

LibriVox Community Podcast #125
For Sunday, February 26, 2012
Multilingual Performances Part Two of a Two-Part Series

Hosted by Bob Gonzalez (bobgon55)

With contributions from Piotrek81, Nadine Eckert-Boulet, Leni, & Martin Geeson

Listen to the LibriVox Community Podcast #125

Duration: 31:14

Teaser & Intro 0:00
Piotrek81 2:07
“The Ackerman Steppe” read by Piotrek81 in Polish & Algy Pug in English 5:00
Nadine Eckert-Boulet 7:10
Nadine reading “Un Matin” in French 11:32
Martin Geeson on being sampled by a musician and the continuing language-averseness of the British 13:02
Leni on recording in Latin 16:24
Martin Geeson on his strange motivation to record multilingually for LibriVox 17:43
Leni on the Multilingual collection of Poe’s “The Raven” 21:10
“The Raven” A Multilingual Collage 24:30
Conclusion and Outro 29:55
Bob Gonzalez
Rhapsodize
A Classic Poetry Performance Initiative
My LibriVox Recordings

Piotrek81
Posts: 3147
Joined: November 3rd, 2011, 2:02 pm
Location: Poznań, Poland

Post by Piotrek81 » February 25th, 2012, 4:59 am

I've just listened to it. Great stuff :thumbs:

I especially liked the part about the multilingual edition of "The Raven". I totally agree that translations of poetry don't give the same feeling. There were cases of "The Raven" translations read in this podcast when I thought "That doesn't sound the way it should" (no offence to the readers intended!). In fact I'm planning to add my reading of the original version to the already existing pile :mrgreen: I know of several Polish translations of this poem, but I have no idea where to find a PD e-text :roll: And then again, the Polish version would probably sound weird to me after I've read (and heard) the original so many times.
Come help us record The Deluge THE DELUGE IS BACK!
Want to hear some PREPARATION TIPS before you press "record"? Listen to THIS and THIS

bobgon55
Posts: 928
Joined: May 24th, 2011, 8:30 am
Location: Tampa, Florida USA
Contact:

Post by bobgon55 » February 25th, 2012, 5:12 am

Glad you liked it, Piotrek! I had fun putting together the collages, yours & Algy's and "The Raven." In fact, that is what took up most of my time! I could only go by cadences and the few words I could make out in all the translations (except Spanish, where I understood most of it). I loved making the collages of the LibriVox disclaimers, too. I thought it was neat to hear the word LibriVox pop up within the sea of non-English words. I especially like the sound of the Chinese version and reader. The goodbye collages were fun, too. Today's podcast had the addition of Kristinjg, who added a couple this week.

What did you think of the experience of hearing your poem with the English translation interspersed within it? I performed a Pablo Neruda poem somewhat like this in a live show with a student of mine and felt it was very effective. The student and I actually switched off with Spanish and English, so that both of us spoke both languages at some points in the poem. I think it is an interesting way to present bilingual poetry to a mixed audience.

Thanks for your support of the podcasts, both as contributor and enthusiastic listener!

Bob
Bob Gonzalez
Rhapsodize
A Classic Poetry Performance Initiative
My LibriVox Recordings

Piotrek81
Posts: 3147
Joined: November 3rd, 2011, 2:02 pm
Location: Poznań, Poland

Post by Piotrek81 » February 25th, 2012, 5:43 am

it was neat to hear the word LibriVox pop up within the sea of non-English words.
Actually, "librivox" is a non-English word too. It's Latin :wink:

As to the sonnet, for the purpose of recreational listening I'd prefer to listen to one poem in its entirety and then the translation, so that the mood and imagery are sustained.

Btw. when doing the final mix for the project of "Sonety krymskie/Sonnets from the Crimea" I found that the English translation is often quite loose. I don't know much about translating poetry, but if it hadn't been for the titles and sequence of poems I would have probably found it difficult to match the versions, at least in some cases.
Come help us record The Deluge THE DELUGE IS BACK!
Want to hear some PREPARATION TIPS before you press "record"? Listen to THIS and THIS

bobgon55
Posts: 928
Joined: May 24th, 2011, 8:30 am
Location: Tampa, Florida USA
Contact:

Post by bobgon55 » February 25th, 2012, 5:50 am

I had a feeling that the English translation was not literal, particularly because it rhymed and was metered. Usually, there is only one or other quality - literal translations are somewhat ugly and "poetic" translations are not very faithful.

And I would say that "LibriVox" is a pseudo-Latin word, since Hugh actually invented it by combining two real Latin words. :wink:
Bob Gonzalez
Rhapsodize
A Classic Poetry Performance Initiative
My LibriVox Recordings

Piotrek81
Posts: 3147
Joined: November 3rd, 2011, 2:02 pm
Location: Poznań, Poland

Post by Piotrek81 » February 25th, 2012, 5:56 am

bobgon55 wrote:And I would say that "LibriVox" is a pseudo-Latin word, since Hugh actually invented it by combining two real Latin words. :wink:
Yup, I know. "It's the kind of word you come up with when you don't know any Latin" if I remember the General FAQ correctly :mrgreen:

Perhaps we will do another bilingual duet project similar to "Sonnets" in the future. We even have a candidate :wink:
Come help us record The Deluge THE DELUGE IS BACK!
Want to hear some PREPARATION TIPS before you press "record"? Listen to THIS and THIS

bobgon55
Posts: 928
Joined: May 24th, 2011, 8:30 am
Location: Tampa, Florida USA
Contact:

Post by bobgon55 » February 25th, 2012, 6:23 am

Piotrek81 wrote: Perhaps we will do another bilingual duet project similar to "Sonnets" in the future. We even have a candidate :wink:
That sounds great. The more bi/multi/lingual projects, the better. :D
Bob Gonzalez
Rhapsodize
A Classic Poetry Performance Initiative
My LibriVox Recordings

Leni
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 9205
Joined: July 27th, 2008, 9:10 pm
Location: Vitória, Brazil

Post by Leni » February 25th, 2012, 9:53 am

Piotrek81 wrote:
bobgon55 wrote:And I would say that "LibriVox" is a pseudo-Latin word, since Hugh actually invented it by combining two real Latin words. :wink:
Yup, I know. "It's the kind of word you come up with when you don't know any Latin" if I remember the General FAQ correctly :mrgreen:
On that, I was a bit surprised when I learned that, because it actually makes sense in Latin. "Libri" would be the correct way of saying "of the book" (liber, libri), and "vox" is the correct way of saying "voice", so it does read as "the voice of the book". Of course, in Latin you wouldn't put them together like that to form just one word. But hey, if you consider Latin was written as scriptio continua for a long time, it doesn't look that strange. :hmm:
Leni

RuthieG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 22046
Joined: April 17th, 2008, 8:41 am
Location: Kent, England
Contact:

Post by RuthieG » February 25th, 2012, 10:55 am

There speaks a true Latin scholar.

I, as a once (much lower) level, Latin scholar, am always mildly irritated when people call it LibroVox, for the very reason that that does NOT seem to make sense to me... voice by the book, voice to the book?... book by the voice would be OK. :lol:

And LibroVox is wrong anyway, of course. But then, I have seen Liverbox and Librewax too. ;)

Ruth
My LV catalogue page | RuthieG's CataBlog of recordings | Tweet: @RuthGolding

bobgon55
Posts: 928
Joined: May 24th, 2011, 8:30 am
Location: Tampa, Florida USA
Contact:

Post by bobgon55 » February 25th, 2012, 11:00 am

Leni, I love the sound of "the voice of the book" for a tag line for LibriVox.

LibriVox: The Voice of the Book

It's also interesting to note that for centuries when writing was first invented, people always read aloud. First, because they would be reading aloud to others who could not read but second, they would even read aloud to themselves, so much and so commonly so that St. Augustine noted in his Confessions the strangeness of Ambrose reading silently. My theory about this is that since humanity was more used to hearing words than seeing words, reading them aloud was the best way for them to embrace the new technology of writing. It's interesting that today we commonly read so silently that those who read aloud their subject matter to themselves or who even just "move their lips" when they read are thought to be "slow" or mentally deficient. (Unless, of course, they are rehearsing for a performance of the text, either live or recorded.)

Thanks for the link to scriptio continua. I think an additionally difficult pattern of writing and reading was boustrophedon, where one read a line left to right, then the next line right to left, then the next left to right again, ad infinitum. The thought of doing that now would drive me crazy!
Bob Gonzalez
Rhapsodize
A Classic Poetry Performance Initiative
My LibriVox Recordings

Piotrek81
Posts: 3147
Joined: November 3rd, 2011, 2:02 pm
Location: Poznań, Poland

Post by Piotrek81 » February 25th, 2012, 11:02 am

@RuthieG
Liverbox? :mrgreen: :lol:
Whoever used that must have had some weird ideas about what the people here are up to :mrgreen: :twisted:
Come help us record The Deluge THE DELUGE IS BACK!
Want to hear some PREPARATION TIPS before you press "record"? Listen to THIS and THIS

TriciaG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 38996
Joined: June 15th, 2008, 10:30 pm
Location: Toronto, ON (but Minnesotan to age 32)

Post by TriciaG » February 25th, 2012, 11:26 am

Piotrek81 wrote:@RuthieG
Liverbox? :mrgreen: :lol:
Whoever used that must have had some weird ideas about what the people here are up to :mrgreen: :twisted:
Well, I can see a dyslexic person doing saying that. ;)
Fiction, open sections mostly adventure in Australia: It Is Never too Late to Mend
Irish Home Rule Arguments: Handbook on Home Rule

Starlite
Posts: 16682
Joined: April 30th, 2006, 2:17 pm
Location: Thunder Bay Ontario, Canada

Post by Starlite » February 25th, 2012, 4:28 pm

Piotrek81 wrote:@RuthieG
Liverbox? :mrgreen: :lol:
Whoever used that must have had some weird ideas about what the people here are up to :mrgreen: :twisted:
It was a child. :)

I think it is in a former podcast so if you go through all of them.... ;)

Esther :)
"Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable
people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress,
therefore, depends on unreasonable people." George Bernard Shaw

annise
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 29302
Joined: April 3rd, 2008, 3:55 am
Location: Melbourne,Australia

Post by annise » February 25th, 2012, 5:54 pm

Maybe they couldn't say "r" very well - I know Australians do not tend to emphasise it much. As a total non Latin student I have always thought Libri reminded me of Free as well as books but it is probably my Aussie ears :D

Anne

Locked