Translations for Volunteer emails

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annise
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 30032
Joined: April 3rd, 2008, 3:55 am
Location: Melbourne,Australia

Post by annise » May 19th, 2012, 5:25 pm

Thank you -
Just for personal interest - is the difference between Portugese(europe) and Portugese (south american) greater than the difference between say English(europe) and English (North American) ?

Anne

Leni
Posts: 9444
Joined: July 27th, 2008, 9:10 pm
Location: Vitória, Brazil

Post by Leni » May 19th, 2012, 6:14 pm

annise wrote:Thank you -
Just for personal interest - is the difference between Portugese(europe) and Portugese (south american) greater than the difference between say English(europe) and English (North American) ?

Anne
In my humble opinion, not really. Which is why I never mark any Portuguese readings or texts with "Brazilian" or "European" and - again, personally! - I find it a bit silly to do so, mainly in text. As the other volunteer pointed out in his message the "accent" is very different, but that doesn't affect text as much as speech. It's perfectly understandable both ways, unless in a more informal register, with use of slang and such things. But then I think British/American/Australian English are just as different.

That puzzles me a lot here in Librivox, why Brazilians/Portuguese make such a point of making the difference between Brazilian/European Portuguese while I've never seen someone coming around and pointing out "This is Argentinian/Colombian/Mexican Spanish!". :hmm:
Leni
=================

DPL needed for Machiavelli! :help:
Come read about flowers and plants in Pliny's Natural History! :D

ccgomes
Posts: 23
Joined: May 18th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Location: Portugal, Vila Franca de Xira
Contact:

Post by ccgomes » May 21st, 2012, 10:05 am

Leni wrote:
annise wrote:Thank you -
Just for personal interest - is the difference between Portugese(europe) and Portugese (south american) greater than the difference between say English(europe) and English (North American) ?

Anne
In my humble opinion, not really. Which is why I never mark any Portuguese readings or texts with "Brazilian" or "European" and - again, personally! - I find it a bit silly to do so, mainly in text. As the other volunteer pointed out in his message the "accent" is very different, but that doesn't affect text as much as speech. It's perfectly understandable both ways, unless in a more informal register, with use of slang and such things. But then I think British/American/Australian English are just as different.

That puzzles me a lot here in Librivox, why Brazilians/Portuguese make such a point of making the difference between Brazilian/European Portuguese while I've never seen someone coming around and pointing out "This is Argentinian/Colombian/Mexican Spanish!". :hmm:
With respect, Leni, I’m not trying to have debate.
As information for Anne: the standard accents are different – which is a good thing because it enriches the Portuguese spoken all over the world. The Brazilian vowels are pronounced more openly and the sibilants “hiss” more that the Portuguese – we, at the end of the words, say “sh” not “s”…
Until the end of the 19th century, the two written varieties of Portuguese were similar in syntax / written text… But after the turn of the century, Brazilian writers and artist’s set free they’re creativity and the popular language was poetically applied (in poems and in prose) – and it was good.

And, Leni:
I sincerely hope never ear Tom Jobim (in “Passarim”, for example) sung in European Portuguese – it would ruin all the magic and melody of the song! I and hope too never ear “Fado” sung with Brazilian accent!
I think Brazilian Portuguese is the variety more melodic and more poetical than the other varieties…
And silly or not, I quote lingua mater: “E pluribus unum”.
Carlos Gomes

sailormoon
Posts: 723
Joined: June 14th, 2011, 10:26 am
Location: Porto, Portugal
Contact:

Post by sailormoon » May 25th, 2012, 5:41 am

I really don't mind listening to a text in either form - it's not like it's another language! We had this project recently from Antero de Quental, and, personally I felt glad to hear the poems in Brazilian/Portuguese. It gave them warmth. As for written, well, my experience tells me that we've managed to understand ourselves fine so far. The more, the better, the continent isn't important - the reading is, and it's really hard to finish projects in Portuguese, sometimes they look a lot more like solos than collaborative works...

Sandra
"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."
Albert Einstein

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