1-minute test

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Emily602
Posts: 4
Joined: September 30th, 2020, 3:19 pm

Post by Emily602 » October 8th, 2020, 2:35 pm

This is my 1 minute test: https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/4test_emily602.mp3

Recorded with Audacity on a Windows 10 computer using the microphone in my earbuds.

Any feedback is appreciated.

Thank you!
Emily602

adrianstephens
Posts: 1425
Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
Location: Cambridge UK
Contact:

Post by adrianstephens » October 8th, 2020, 10:44 pm

Emily602 wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 2:35 pm
This is my 1 minute test: https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/4test_emily602.mp3

Recorded with Audacity on a Windows 10 computer using the microphone in my earbuds.

Any feedback is appreciated.

Thank you!
Emily602
Hello Emily,
Welcome to librivox.

You need to make change(s) in order to meet Librivox's technical standards. It's hard for me to comment on
your reading because it's hard to hear. Listen to your own track critically, then read the comments below.

I suspect you will not get workable results with your earbud mic, because it will be hard to control its position.

Required: The volume is too low.
You can download the checker program (https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Checker) which you can use to check the volume against the expected range. This recording was 82 dB, and the normal range is 86-92 dB. In Audacity, you can use Effects / Normalize or Effects / Amplify to change the volume post-recording.

Required: There is a lot of background noise. It sounds to me like a fan.
You can listen to the noise by taking a portion of silence and normalizing it (Effects/Normalize) to that you can hear it clearly. Think to yourself, what is the source of the noise?
There are three things you can try to reduce the background noise. You might need to do more than one of these.
1. Avoid the noise. Move to a quieter room. Turn off the clothes drier. Choose a quieter time of day to record. Set the laptop power settings to "passive cooling".
2. Move closer to the microphone, but watch out for those "p" sounds! You should be about 4 inches (10cm) from the microphone. You will need to position it to the side or use a pop filter.
3. Use noise reduction using Audacity. You can highlight the noise in Audacity by changing the track's display mode to "Waveform (db)" using the little pulldown arrow just to the right of the track name (prior to 2.4) or in Edit/Preferences/Tracks/Default Waveform scale: Logarithmic (dB) (2.4 on). I recommend leaving it there, as I do all my editing in this mode. Then perform noise cleaning as shown here: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Noise_Cleaning. I recommend making this a part of your editing routine. You'll be surprised how much difference it makes, but be careful of over-doing it (more than about 18dB), which can affect the quality.


Please address at least the required technical issue(s) and upload a new version. If you quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.



If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.


Thank you for participating in Librivox,
Adrian Stephens
My Librivox-related YouTube series starts here: Part 0: Introduction. https://youtu.be/pMHYycgA5VU
...
Part 15: Case Study (Poem) https://youtu.be/41sr_VC1Qxo
Part 16: Case Study 2 (Dramatic Reading) https://youtu.be/GBIAd469vnM

Emily602
Posts: 4
Joined: September 30th, 2020, 3:19 pm

Post by Emily602 » October 29th, 2020, 3:43 pm

adrianstephens wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 10:44 pm
Emily602 wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 2:35 pm
This is my 1 minute test: https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/4test_emily602.mp3

Recorded with Audacity on a Windows 10 computer using the microphone in my earbuds.

Any feedback is appreciated.

Thank you!
Emily602
Hello Emily,
Welcome to librivox.

You need to make change(s) in order to meet Librivox's technical standards. It's hard for me to comment on
your reading because it's hard to hear. Listen to your own track critically, then read the comments below.

I suspect you will not get workable results with your earbud mic, because it will be hard to control its position.

Required: The volume is too low.
You can download the checker program (https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Checker) which you can use to check the volume against the expected range. This recording was 82 dB, and the normal range is 86-92 dB. In Audacity, you can use Effects / Normalize or Effects / Amplify to change the volume post-recording.

Required: There is a lot of background noise. It sounds to me like a fan.
You can listen to the noise by taking a portion of silence and normalizing it (Effects/Normalize) to that you can hear it clearly. Think to yourself, what is the source of the noise?
There are three things you can try to reduce the background noise. You might need to do more than one of these.
1. Avoid the noise. Move to a quieter room. Turn off the clothes drier. Choose a quieter time of day to record. Set the laptop power settings to "passive cooling".
2. Move closer to the microphone, but watch out for those "p" sounds! You should be about 4 inches (10cm) from the microphone. You will need to position it to the side or use a pop filter.
3. Use noise reduction using Audacity. You can highlight the noise in Audacity by changing the track's display mode to "Waveform (db)" using the little pulldown arrow just to the right of the track name (prior to 2.4) or in Edit/Preferences/Tracks/Default Waveform scale: Logarithmic (dB) (2.4 on). I recommend leaving it there, as I do all my editing in this mode. Then perform noise cleaning as shown here: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Noise_Cleaning. I recommend making this a part of your editing routine. You'll be surprised how much difference it makes, but be careful of over-doing it (more than about 18dB), which can affect the quality.


Please address at least the required technical issue(s) and upload a new version. If you quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.



If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.


Thank you for participating in Librivox,
Adrian Stephens

Hello Mr. Stephens,

Thank you for the feedback. I now have a USB microphone, and I used the Noise Reduction and Amplify effects in Audacity to edit my recording. Here it is:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/3test_emily602.mp3

Emily

adrianstephens
Posts: 1425
Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
Location: Cambridge UK
Contact:

Post by adrianstephens » October 29th, 2020, 10:56 pm

Emily602 wrote:
October 29th, 2020, 3:43 pm
adrianstephens wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 10:44 pm


Hello Emily,
Welcome to librivox.

You need to make change(s) in order to meet Librivox's technical standards. It's hard for me to comment on
your reading because it's hard to hear. Listen to your own track critically, then read the comments below.

I suspect you will not get workable results with your earbud mic, because it will be hard to control its position.

Required: The volume is too low.
You can download the checker program (https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Checker) which you can use to check the volume against the expected range. This recording was 82 dB, and the normal range is 86-92 dB. In Audacity, you can use Effects / Normalize or Effects / Amplify to change the volume post-recording.

Required: There is a lot of background noise. It sounds to me like a fan.
You can listen to the noise by taking a portion of silence and normalizing it (Effects/Normalize) to that you can hear it clearly. Think to yourself, what is the source of the noise?
There are three things you can try to reduce the background noise. You might need to do more than one of these.
1. Avoid the noise. Move to a quieter room. Turn off the clothes drier. Choose a quieter time of day to record. Set the laptop power settings to "passive cooling".
2. Move closer to the microphone, but watch out for those "p" sounds! You should be about 4 inches (10cm) from the microphone. You will need to position it to the side or use a pop filter.
3. Use noise reduction using Audacity. You can highlight the noise in Audacity by changing the track's display mode to "Waveform (db)" using the little pulldown arrow just to the right of the track name (prior to 2.4) or in Edit/Preferences/Tracks/Default Waveform scale: Logarithmic (dB) (2.4 on). I recommend leaving it there, as I do all my editing in this mode. Then perform noise cleaning as shown here: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Noise_Cleaning. I recommend making this a part of your editing routine. You'll be surprised how much difference it makes, but be careful of over-doing it (more than about 18dB), which can affect the quality.


Please address at least the required technical issue(s) and upload a new version. If you quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.



If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.


Thank you for participating in Librivox,
Adrian Stephens

Hello Mr. Stephens,

Thank you for the feedback. I now have a USB microphone, and I used the Noise Reduction and Amplify effects in Audacity to edit my recording. Here it is:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/3test_emily602.mp3

Emily
Hello Emily,

I'm afraid you still have a problem with noise. Please listen to your own recording. You hear that hum? That's what needs to go.
At this level of background noise, Audacity Noise Reduction won't help you. It can remove the hum, but it will leave the speech badly distorted.

So you need to find out where it's coming from. Please try recording in different rooms and see if the noise is present. Once you've reduced the noise as much as you can, then you can apply noise reduction.


Best Regards,
Adrian
My Librivox-related YouTube series starts here: Part 0: Introduction. https://youtu.be/pMHYycgA5VU
...
Part 15: Case Study (Poem) https://youtu.be/41sr_VC1Qxo
Part 16: Case Study 2 (Dramatic Reading) https://youtu.be/GBIAd469vnM

MaryAnnSpiegel
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16158
Joined: February 23rd, 2009, 4:37 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Post by MaryAnnSpiegel » November 18th, 2020, 8:52 pm

Emily,

If you'd like to upload a raw recording (before you do noise cleaning), I'd be happy to take a listen and see if we can work out how to get rid of the noise without damaging your lovely voice!

You're a great reader so I'd love to find a way to help you sort out the technical/equipment stuff.

MaryAnn

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