1 Minute Test

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Duragan
Posts: 2
Joined: September 21st, 2018, 10:20 am

Post by Duragan » February 4th, 2020, 12:06 am

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_duragan.mp3

Recorded using Audacity with an XLR mic. I am extremely new at this so any help is appreciated.

adrianstephens
Posts: 395
Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
Location: Cambridge UK
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Post by adrianstephens » February 4th, 2020, 10:11 am

Duragan wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 12:06 am
https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_duragan.mp3

Recorded using Audacity with an XLR mic. I am extremely new at this so any help is appreciated.
Hello Duragan,

Welcome to librivox. You have a clear reading voice. You meeting librivox technical standards
and are good to go! Proof Listen OK. :thumbs:

I'll take your request for feedback to provide additional information to provide constructive criticsm.

This is the first time I've seen "excessive editing" in a 1-minute test :0). In my own work, I do noise reduction, level adjustment and then cut out any distracting noises. I can't tell if you did noise reduction, but I do see a prominent low frequency noise (e.g. at 17.6 s). Switch to "Waveform (db) (near the top left of the track window from the drop-down menu), this will highlight the things I'm discussing.
In most of the gaps you've done a "clear". e.g. at 10.75s. This has to be done carefully - i.e. where the signal has already died down close to zero. In this case it hadn't and there is a noticable "hard stop" to the signal at 10.7s.
I recommend you do noise reduction as a part of your standard routine. If this doesn't get rid of the low frequency noise I can see, do an Effect/Equalizer, and choose something with a bass roll-off. You can experiment with the cutoff frequency so that you hit your noise.

After this, I doubt you will need to use "clear" (^L) very often. I use it for excessive breathing between lines in a dramatic performance, but normally I leave my breathing sounds in.


If you upload a new version and quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.

If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.

Then spend some time becoming familiar with the forum and looking for projects that you think you'd enjoy working on. Just jump right in wherever it feels comfortable. Most of all, always have fun. You'll find lots of interesting material to record. If you're like me, you'll also discover you're learning a lot in the process and being exposed to books I otherwise wouldn't have opened or known about. You'll be contributing to an interesting project and interacting with a lot of fun and varied fellow LibriVox volunteers in the process.


Thank you again for participating in Librivox
Adrian Stephens

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