test for drempels [OK]

All languages: post your test recording here. Help check audio files, provide editing services, and advertise for proof-listeners.
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drempels
Posts: 4
Joined: January 15th, 2020, 6:36 pm

Post by drempels » February 3rd, 2020, 10:41 am

Dear all,

This is my first recording. I am using Audacity on a Mac and I have a USB mic. I have not edited the file at all. Thank you for any suggestions!

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_drempels.mp3


Catherine

adrianstephens
Posts: 526
Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
Location: Cambridge UK
Contact:

Post by adrianstephens » February 4th, 2020, 9:52 am

drempels wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 10:41 am
Dear all,

This is my first recording. I am using Audacity on a Mac and I have a USB mic. I have not edited the file at all. Thank you for any suggestions!

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_drempels.mp3


Catherine
Hello Catherine,

Welcome to librivox. You have a nice clear voice, I had no trouble understanding you.
As it stands you meet Librivox technical standards. Proof Listen OK! :thumbs:

I'll take your request for feedback to provide additional information to provide constructive criticsm.
Don't be put off by this. You've already done enough to start recording.


There is some barely noticeable background noise. You might try performing noise cleaning as shown here: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Noise_Cleaning. I recommend making this a part of your editing routine. You'll be surprised how much difference it makes. You can also move closer to the mic, this will make a lot of difference - but watch out for those popping "p"s !

There are some noticeable plosives in the "P" sounds, e.g. see at 11.60s. There are some different ways to fix this: 1) move away from the microphone or position in the microphone to the side of your face; 2) get a "pop" filter in front of your microphone; or 3) repair the plosives as described here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inbSdGb26XQ. Prevention is much easier than cure.

Now, I'm getting really picky...
Your voice has got the same click sounds in it (from the soft palette) as mine. When I started, I got people asking if I was playing with the mouse while recording. If you look at 11.15 and 8.3 you'll see an example. There are different ways to handle this:
1. Ignore it. This is my best advice, and what I do most of the time.
2. Individually edit out clicks - easily done, but time consuming. I only do this for clicks that I find egregious (whatever that means).
3. Separate the act of breathing or stretching your throat ready to speak from the speech itself - i.e., deliberately include pauses of a second or so between lines / sentences that get edited out with the offending clicks.


If you upload a new version and quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.

If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.

Then spend some time becoming familiar with the forum and looking for projects that you think you'd enjoy working on. Just jump right in wherever it feels comfortable. Most of all, always have fun. You'll find lots of interesting material to record. If you're like me, you'll also discover you're learning a lot in the process and being exposed to books I otherwise wouldn't have opened or known about. You'll be contributing to an interesting project and interacting with a lot of fun and varied fellow LibriVox volunteers in the process.


Thank you again for participating in Librivox
Adrian Stephens
My Librivox-related YouTube series starts here: Part 0: Introduction. https://youtu.be/pMHYycgA5VU
...
Part 15: Case Study (Poem) https://youtu.be/41sr_VC1Qxo
Part 16: Case Study 2 (Dramatic Reading) https://youtu.be/GBIAd469vnM

drempels
Posts: 4
Joined: January 15th, 2020, 6:36 pm

Post by drempels » February 10th, 2020, 9:59 am

Hi, Adrian,

Thanks so much for the detailed feedback! I recorded a second test. I put the microphone off to the side, deleted one obvious click, and tried noise reduction. Let me know if you think it works. https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test2_drempels.mp3

Thanks,
Catherine
adrianstephens wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 9:52 am
drempels wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 10:41 am
Dear all,

This is my first recording. I am using Audacity on a Mac and I have a USB mic. I have not edited the file at all. Thank you for any suggestions!

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_drempels.mp3


Catherine
Hello Catherine,

Welcome to librivox. You have a nice clear voice, I had no trouble understanding you.
As it stands you meet Librivox technical standards. Proof Listen OK! :thumbs:

I'll take your request for feedback to provide additional information to provide constructive criticsm.
Don't be put off by this. You've already done enough to start recording.


There is some barely noticeable background noise. You might try performing noise cleaning as shown here: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Noise_Cleaning. I recommend making this a part of your editing routine. You'll be surprised how much difference it makes. You can also move closer to the mic, this will make a lot of difference - but watch out for those popping "p"s !

There are some noticeable plosives in the "P" sounds, e.g. see at 11.60s. There are some different ways to fix this: 1) move away from the microphone or position in the microphone to the side of your face; 2) get a "pop" filter in front of your microphone; or 3) repair the plosives as described here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inbSdGb26XQ. Prevention is much easier than cure.

Now, I'm getting really picky...
Your voice has got the same click sounds in it (from the soft palette) as mine. When I started, I got people asking if I was playing with the mouse while recording. If you look at 11.15 and 8.3 you'll see an example. There are different ways to handle this:
1. Ignore it. This is my best advice, and what I do most of the time.
2. Individually edit out clicks - easily done, but time consuming. I only do this for clicks that I find egregious (whatever that means).
3. Separate the act of breathing or stretching your throat ready to speak from the speech itself - i.e., deliberately include pauses of a second or so between lines / sentences that get edited out with the offending clicks.


If you upload a new version and quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.

If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.

Then spend some time becoming familiar with the forum and looking for projects that you think you'd enjoy working on. Just jump right in wherever it feels comfortable. Most of all, always have fun. You'll find lots of interesting material to record. If you're like me, you'll also discover you're learning a lot in the process and being exposed to books I otherwise wouldn't have opened or known about. You'll be contributing to an interesting project and interacting with a lot of fun and varied fellow LibriVox volunteers in the process.


Thank you again for participating in Librivox
Adrian Stephens

adrianstephens
Posts: 526
Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
Location: Cambridge UK
Contact:

Post by adrianstephens » February 10th, 2020, 2:45 pm

drempels wrote:
February 10th, 2020, 9:59 am
Hi, Adrian,

Thanks so much for the detailed feedback! I recorded a second test. I put the microphone off to the side, deleted one obvious click, and tried noise reduction. Let me know if you think it works. https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test2_drempels.mp3

Thanks,
Catherine

Hello Catherine,

Still proof listen OK. :thumbs:

This is improved and easily meets librivox standards. The issue with the plosives has gone away. I think you can still do more on the noise reduction front without damaging the quality - there is a barely perceptible hiss. But you don't need to do that now. Go and do some fun
recordings - you will develop your editing skills, including dealing with noise, over time.

Have fun!

Best Regards,
Adrian
My Librivox-related YouTube series starts here: Part 0: Introduction. https://youtu.be/pMHYycgA5VU
...
Part 15: Case Study (Poem) https://youtu.be/41sr_VC1Qxo
Part 16: Case Study 2 (Dramatic Reading) https://youtu.be/GBIAd469vnM

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