1-Minute Test for Adalwolf313 [OK]

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Adalwolf313
Posts: 12
Joined: January 31st, 2020, 9:52 pm
Location: Denver, CO

Post by Adalwolf313 » February 2nd, 2020, 1:16 pm

Hello,

Bellow is the link to my 1-minute test:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_adalwolf313.mp3

This test was recorded in Audacity on a Windows computer using a USB mic.

Please let me know what I can do to improve. Thank you!

adrianstephens
Posts: 436
Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
Location: Cambridge UK
Contact:

Post by adrianstephens » February 3rd, 2020, 2:43 am

Adalwolf313 wrote:
February 2nd, 2020, 1:16 pm
Hello,

Bellow is the link to my 1-minute test:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_adalwolf313.mp3

This test was recorded in Audacity on a Windows computer using a USB mic.

Please let me know what I can do to improve. Thank you!
Hello Tyrel,
Welcome to librivox. You have a very clear voice. Nice pacing.

This meets Librivox technical standards. Proof Listen OK. :thumbs:

There's one little technical change you could make that will improve the recording.
There is some audible, but not intrusive, background noise. Please consider performing noise cleaning as shown here: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Noise_Cleaning. I recommend making this a part of your editing routine. You'll be surprised how much difference it makes. You can also move closer to the mic, this will make a lot of difference - but watch out for those popping "p"s !

If you upload a new version, please quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.

If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.

Then spend some time becoming familiar with the forum and looking for projects that you think you'd enjoy working on. Just jump right in wherever it feels comfortable. Most of all, always have fun. You'll find lots of interesting material to record. If you're like me, you'll also discover you're learning a lot in the process and being exposed to books I otherwise wouldn't have opened or known about. You'll be contributing to an interesting project and interacting with a lot of fun and varied fellow LibriVox volunteers in the process.


Thank you again for participating in Librivox
Adrian Stephens
My YouTube post on "Microphones, Noise, Audacity and Librivox" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NryVVLjd_Uk

Adalwolf313
Posts: 12
Joined: January 31st, 2020, 9:52 pm
Location: Denver, CO

Post by Adalwolf313 » February 4th, 2020, 7:45 pm

adrianstephens wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 2:43 am

Hello Tyrel,
Welcome to librivox. You have a very clear voice. Nice pacing.

This meets Librivox technical standards. Proof Listen OK. :thumbs:

There's one little technical change you could make that will improve the recording.
There is some audible, but not intrusive, background noise. Please consider performing noise cleaning as shown here: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Noise_Cleaning. I recommend making this a part of your editing routine. You'll be surprised how much difference it makes. You can also move closer to the mic, this will make a lot of difference - but watch out for those popping "p"s !

If you upload a new version, please quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check.

If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.

Then spend some time becoming familiar with the forum and looking for projects that you think you'd enjoy working on. Just jump right in wherever it feels comfortable. Most of all, always have fun. You'll find lots of interesting material to record. If you're like me, you'll also discover you're learning a lot in the process and being exposed to books I otherwise wouldn't have opened or known about. You'll be contributing to an interesting project and interacting with a lot of fun and varied fellow LibriVox volunteers in the process.


Thank you again for participating in Librivox
Adrian Stephens
Hi Adrian,

Thanks for the feedback! I'm really looking forward to discovering new books and learning along the way.

Here's a link to a another run I did (brand new recording) with some light noise cleaning: https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_adalwolf313(2).mp3

There's a little computer "thinking noise" audible at the beginning of the recording, but other than that it sounds good to me. Please let me know what you think though! I think that the computer noise would mostly only happen when I first hit Record, so I'll make sure to leave a few seconds of silence or something at the beginning of each recording. That, or I"ll have to move my setup around and keep the mic further from my laptop. One thing that I'm having a hard time figuring out is the best way to reduce the sound when I inhale. Any recommendations for that?

Thanks again!

-Tyrel

adrianstephens
Posts: 436
Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
Location: Cambridge UK
Contact:

Post by adrianstephens » February 5th, 2020, 2:31 am

Adalwolf313 wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 7:45 pm

Hi Adrian,

Thanks for the feedback! I'm really looking forward to discovering new books and learning along the way.

Here's a link to a another run I did (brand new recording) with some light noise cleaning: https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_adalwolf313(2).mp3

There's a little computer "thinking noise" audible at the beginning of the recording, but other than that it sounds good to me. Please let me know what you think though! I think that the computer noise would mostly only happen when I first hit Record, so I'll make sure to leave a few seconds of silence or something at the beginning of each recording. That, or I"ll have to move my setup around and keep the mic further from my laptop. One thing that I'm having a hard time figuring out is the best way to reduce the sound when I inhale. Any recommendations for that?

Thanks again!

-Tyrel
Hello Tyrel,

This is good from all aspects.
You reduced the noise to a level that nobody is going to notice unless they really look for it.
I didn't hear the "thinking noise" you mentioned. Use display mode (Waveform (db)) (drop down
menu near top left of track window) to help see noise.

Keeping the MIC away from noise sources is good. Having an omni mic will help. Moving
closer to the mic helps too.

As to sound when you inhale - don't worry about it. We all breathe. Listeners expect to hear it.
If I'm reading lines in a dramatic reading, I'll take a breath in, pause and then say my line.
I can then clear out the breath easily because it is separated from the speech. But in normal
fluent speech, there is absolutely no need to pay attention to the breathing unless your voice
does something truly horrible - which yours does not.

How much noise reduction is "light"? I generally end up applying 12-15 db. Anything much more
than that can start to create noticable changes to the quality of the speech.

Best Regards,
Adrian
My YouTube post on "Microphones, Noise, Audacity and Librivox" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NryVVLjd_Uk

Adalwolf313
Posts: 12
Joined: January 31st, 2020, 9:52 pm
Location: Denver, CO

Post by Adalwolf313 » February 5th, 2020, 10:28 am

adrianstephens wrote:
February 5th, 2020, 2:31 am

Hello Tyrel,

This is good from all aspects.
You reduced the noise to a level that nobody is going to notice unless they really look for it.
I didn't hear the "thinking noise" you mentioned. Use display mode (Waveform (db)) (drop down
menu near top left of track window) to help see noise.

Keeping the MIC away from noise sources is good. Having an omni mic will help. Moving
closer to the mic helps too.

As to sound when you inhale - don't worry about it. We all breathe. Listeners expect to hear it.
If I'm reading lines in a dramatic reading, I'll take a breath in, pause and then say my line.
I can then clear out the breath easily because it is separated from the speech. But in normal
fluent speech, there is absolutely no need to pay attention to the breathing unless your voice
does something truly horrible - which yours does not.

How much noise reduction is "light"? I generally end up applying 12-15 db. Anything much more
than that can start to create noticable changes to the quality of the speech.

Best Regards,
Adrian
Glad to hear that it sounds good to you. I guess I'm just being too critical of how it sounds since it's mine ;)

I can't remember exactly how much noise reduction I used (and I'm away from my main computer right now) but I'm fairly certain it was only within the 12-15 db range.

Well, I think that I'm going to explore the forum some more now and look for a project to jump into.

Thanks again for all your help and advice!

Best,

-Tyrel

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