My 1 min Test

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CMarvin78
Posts: 14
Joined: December 13th, 2019, 7:27 pm

Post by CMarvin78 » December 29th, 2019, 7:32 pm

Hello Everyone,

This is the link to my 1 minute test. I appreciate any constructive feedback you can offer. Thanks! :D
This was recorded on Audactiy on a MacBook Pro. Thanks.

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_cmarvin78.mp3
"The scariest moment is always just before you start." --Stephen King
-----
CMarvin78

Thirsch
Posts: 334
Joined: October 11th, 2010, 10:09 am
Location: Tampa, FL
Contact:

Post by Thirsch » December 30th, 2019, 11:47 am

CMarvin78 wrote:
December 29th, 2019, 7:32 pm
Hello Everyone,

This is the link to my 1 minute test. I appreciate any constructive feedback you can offer. Thanks! :D
This was recorded on Audactiy on a MacBook Pro. Thanks.

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_cmarvin78.mp3
Hi Carla . . . .

. . . and welcome :) I've downloaded your recording so I can look at the technical aspects of the file.

Listening to it I found it clear, well-paced and enunciated. All-in-all easy to understand.

I'll get back to you on the "tecky" stuff soon.

Tom Hirsch
See you in the library . . . . .

CMarvin78
Posts: 14
Joined: December 13th, 2019, 7:27 pm

Post by CMarvin78 » December 30th, 2019, 12:18 pm

Thank you Tom! I tried to get the settings correct, but am new to Audacity, so just let me know :)
"The scariest moment is always just before you start." --Stephen King
-----
CMarvin78

Thirsch
Posts: 334
Joined: October 11th, 2010, 10:09 am
Location: Tampa, FL
Contact:

Post by Thirsch » December 30th, 2019, 12:30 pm

Carla,

There are a few minor technical changes you need to make that will improve the recording and make it acceptable.

There is no noticeable background noise which can distract from the reading, and DC Bias is good.

Required: The file's format is MP3 mono at variable 94kb/s. The specification we use for all MP3 recordings in Librivox is mono 128 kb/s constant bit rate. You can set this on the "save as MP3" dialog in Audacity, and it will persist the next time you do a save.

Required: LibriVox recording standard require 1/2 second of "lead-in" silence and 5 seconds of silence at the end of the file. These allow for smooth processing and listening when all the sections of the book are ultimately merged together into a unified whole for folks to download from the catalog. Your test file has about 1.5 seconds lead-in silence and only 3 seconds at the end.

Required: the overall volume of the recording is low according to Checker. You can download the Checker program (https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Checker) which you can use to check the volume against the expected range. This recording was 84 dB, and the normal range is 86-92 dB.
There are a couple ways to address this; one is better than the other.

Volume #1: This is the better of the two methods for controling recording volume. Before recording using Audacity find the slider control at the top of the screen with the small black microphone icon. This controls the "input gain" (volume) from the microphone into your recording . I have mine set permanently to about 0.82. You'll have to experiment to see what works best for your recording style and the microphone you're using. You can see the current setting by using the mouse to point to the blue slider control dot and letting it hover. If you double-click the blue dot a setting window will open allowing for precise setting. Otherwise you can just slide the blue dot right or left manually. The mic volume on the recording input meter while you're speaking should bounce up to right about 12 in normal conversation. I always double-check this before starting every recording session.

Volume #2: The above approach needs to be done BEFORE you record. If you discover low input volume AFTER a long recording session try altering the volume with the Effects -> Amplify setting. Your file needs to be amplified by a factor of about +4.9dB to bring it up to about 89.0dB. That's quite a sizeable increase and you might find it introducing a combination of other problems that are easily avoided by controling the input right from the source.

If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.

Then spend some time becoming familiar with the forum and looking for projects that you think you'd enjoy working on. Just jump right in wherever it feels comfortable. Most of all, always have fun. You'll find lots of interesting material to record. If you're like me, you'll also discover you're learning a lot in the process and being exposed to books I otherwise wouldn't have opened or known about. You'll be contributing to an interesting project and interacting with a lot of fun and varied fellow LibriVox volunteers in the process.

Please address the required issue and upload a new version. If you quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check. Thank you again for participating in Librivox

Tom Hirsch
See you in the library . . . . .

CMarvin78
Posts: 14
Joined: December 13th, 2019, 7:27 pm

Post by CMarvin78 » December 30th, 2019, 4:23 pm

Thirsch wrote:
December 30th, 2019, 12:30 pm
Carla,

There are a few minor technical changes you need to make that will improve the recording and make it acceptable.

There is no noticeable background noise which can distract from the reading, and DC Bias is good.

Required: The file's format is MP3 mono at variable 94kb/s. The specification we use for all MP3 recordings in Librivox is mono 128 kb/s constant bit rate. You can set this on the "save as MP3" dialog in Audacity, and it will persist the next time you do a save.

Required: LibriVox recording standard require 1/2 second of "lead-in" silence and 5 seconds of silence at the end of the file. These allow for smooth processing and listening when all the sections of the book are ultimately merged together into a unified whole for folks to download from the catalog. Your test file has about 1.5 seconds lead-in silence and only 3 seconds at the end.

Required: the overall volume of the recording is low according to Checker. You can download the Checker program (https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Checker) which you can use to check the volume against the expected range. This recording was 84 dB, and the normal range is 86-92 dB.
There are a couple ways to address this; one is better than the other.

Volume #1: This is the better of the two methods for controling recording volume. Before recording using Audacity find the slider control at the top of the screen with the small black microphone icon. This controls the "input gain" (volume) from the microphone into your recording . I have mine set permanently to about 0.82. You'll have to experiment to see what works best for your recording style and the microphone you're using. You can see the current setting by using the mouse to point to the blue slider control dot and letting it hover. If you double-click the blue dot a setting window will open allowing for precise setting. Otherwise you can just slide the blue dot right or left manually. The mic volume on the recording input meter while you're speaking should bounce up to right about 12 in normal conversation. I always double-check this before starting every recording session.

Volume #2: The above approach needs to be done BEFORE you record. If you discover low input volume AFTER a long recording session try altering the volume with the Effects -> Amplify setting. Your file needs to be amplified by a factor of about +4.9dB to bring it up to about 89.0dB. That's quite a sizeable increase and you might find it introducing a combination of other problems that are easily avoided by controling the input right from the source.

If you haven't already, you might spend some time browsing through the LibriVox Wiki. It contains a wealth of great information that you'll find useful and informative about who does what, and various technical aspects.

Then spend some time becoming familiar with the forum and looking for projects that you think you'd enjoy working on. Just jump right in wherever it feels comfortable. Most of all, always have fun. You'll find lots of interesting material to record. If you're like me, you'll also discover you're learning a lot in the process and being exposed to books I otherwise wouldn't have opened or known about. You'll be contributing to an interesting project and interacting with a lot of fun and varied fellow LibriVox volunteers in the process.

Please address the required issue and upload a new version. If you quote this message in your reply, I'll get a notification and will go in and re-check. Thank you again for participating in Librivox

Tom Hirsch
Tom,
Thank you very much for the feedback and instructions! I have made a new file and uploaded it
https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_cmarvin78.mp3 . I did run it through the Checker this time and it passed :) I will eagerly await
your new feedback :)
"The scariest moment is always just before you start." --Stephen King
-----
CMarvin78

Thirsch
Posts: 334
Joined: October 11th, 2010, 10:09 am
Location: Tampa, FL
Contact:

Post by Thirsch » December 30th, 2019, 7:43 pm

Well done, Carla :D

You are PL OK and ready to go. :clap:

All tech parameters are within or close to specs.

The one thing I'll advise you to watch carefully is your lead-in time and "outro" time. The lead-in for the new file you sent was just a tad longer than it should be. The silence at the end ("outro") was also a tad longer than spec. It wasn't bad enough to say that you need to make any further adjustment for purposes of this test. But keep an eye on it. It is the kind of thing that you will be called on to correct by others doing a proof listen (PL) when you upload files.

Now spend some time with the Wiki and cruising the "Readers Wanted" board looking for a project you think you'd like to join into. Don't be bashful. If a project looks interesting read the summary, check out the magic window, and take a look at the book on-line to see if you like the writing style. You'll find all kinds of different works available. Choose one you'll be comfortable with and remember to always have fun. You're joining a great volunteer project where you're going to read a lot of wonderful material and enjoy the support and encouragement of a whole bunch of good people.

Welcome aboard . . . . .

Tom
See you in the library . . . . .

CMarvin78
Posts: 14
Joined: December 13th, 2019, 7:27 pm

Post by CMarvin78 » December 30th, 2019, 8:03 pm

Thirsch wrote:
December 30th, 2019, 7:43 pm
Well done, Carla :D

You are PL OK and ready to go. :clap:

All tech parameters are within or close to specs.

The one thing I'll advise you to watch carefully is your lead-in time and "outro" time. The lead-in for the new file you sent was just a tad longer than it should be. The silence at the end ("outro") was also a tad longer than spec. It wasn't bad enough to say that you need to make any further adjustment for purposes of this test. But keep an eye on it. It is the kind of thing that you will be called on to correct by others doing a proof listen (PL) when you upload files.

Now spend some time with the Wiki and cruising the "Readers Wanted" board looking for a project you think you'd like to join into. Don't be bashful. If a project looks interesting read the summary, check out the magic window, and take a look at the book on-line to see if you like the writing style. You'll find all kinds of different works available. Choose one you'll be comfortable with and remember to always have fun. You're joining a great volunteer project where you're going to read a lot of wonderful material and enjoy the support and encouragement of a whole bunch of good people.

Welcome aboard . . . . .

Tom
Thank you very much! Excited to join the club and do some great reading!
"The scariest moment is always just before you start." --Stephen King
-----
CMarvin78

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