One Minute Test

All languages: post your test recording here. Help check audio files, provide editing services, and advertise for proof-listeners.
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MelAtto
Posts: 15
Joined: April 15th, 2019, 10:16 pm

Post by MelAtto » May 7th, 2019, 9:39 pm

All criticism and pointers welcome

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/George_Pruden_II_Vocal_Test.mp3


Software
Windows 8.1
Audacity 2.3.0

Mixing Board
Mackie ProFX8 v2
connected to my PC by USB

Mic
Sennheiser e845
Mogami cable connecting the mic to the mixer
"You should only use internet signatures to say silly things."

--George Washington Carver

tgautier
Posts: 1
Joined: May 6th, 2019, 12:27 pm

Post by tgautier » May 7th, 2019, 10:21 pm

You have a great voice for recording! Great pacing as well. I didn't pick up on any hum or background noise and audio quality sounded good. However, the volume did seem a little low.

lymiewithpurpose
Posts: 1677
Joined: January 18th, 2019, 6:26 pm
Location: California

Post by lymiewithpurpose » May 8th, 2019, 2:49 pm

tgautier wrote:
May 7th, 2019, 10:21 pm
You have a great voice for recording! Great pacing as well. I didn't pick up on any hum or background noise and audio quality sounded good. However, the volume did seem a little low.
I second this. Lovely recording and quality is fine! From a more technical standpoint, your volume is only at 68 dbs, while we need a 86-92 with 89 being preferred. Do you have the Checker program yet? Even though you seem to know what you are doing from all your equipment, I will attach instructions in case they are helpful.
I recommend increasing the microphone slider in Audacity, so that it will input at a higher value. To fix this recording however:
1. Select your entire recording
2. Go to menu items Effect>Amplify
3. Enter whatever number you need to get to 89 (in this case 21) in the first box
4. Hit OK.
This should get you to the required range!

Then, you will most likely have a background noise issue. To deal with this:
1. Select a small piece of your recording that is pure noise
2. Go into menu items Effect>Noise Reduction
3. In Section 2 on the screen, choose your settings. My settings are Noise Reduction: 12, Sensitivity: 6, Frequency: 0.
4. Select 'Get Noise Profile'.
5. Select your entire recording.
6. Go to menu items Effect>Repeat Noise Reduction.
7. Take a listen, you may find that you want to do this over again to reduce more noise.

Once you do this, please re upload, post in this thread, and I'll take another look!
Campbell
Constructive criticism always welcome

Readers wanted: The Cliff-Dwellers

MelAtto
Posts: 15
Joined: April 15th, 2019, 10:16 pm

Post by MelAtto » May 9th, 2019, 10:29 am

Take 2

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/George_Pruden_II_Vocal_Test_2.mp3


This is exactly the type of feedback I was looking for
I really appreciate your direction tgautier and lymiewithpurpose

Lymie
You seem (at least slightly) familiar with Audacity
I have some questions


Is there a way to monitor decibel levels in Audacity during a recording session? Not just the feedback graph, but a numerical value as well?

After editing the decibel level
I feel like I am hearing some digital sibilance
Is that normal after amplification?
Is it caused mainly by amplification?
Is the best way to deal with that by recording at the proper levels?

Thank you in advance
I hope to contribute to the community
To balance out the help I am receiving
"You should only use internet signatures to say silly things."

--George Washington Carver

lymiewithpurpose
Posts: 1677
Joined: January 18th, 2019, 6:26 pm
Location: California

Post by lymiewithpurpose » May 9th, 2019, 2:49 pm

Ok, first of all, everything is great so you have the OK to begin recording. Next, to your questions.
MelAtto wrote:
May 9th, 2019, 10:29 am
Is there a way to monitor decibel levels in Audacity during a recording session? Not just the feedback graph, but a numerical value as well?
Personally, I have not found any way to do so. However, you can get a sense of if you are at the right levels by seeing if your waves peak at around the 0.5 mark. Checker will give you a more definite answer. Here's a pic of what it should look like:
Image
MelAtto wrote:
May 9th, 2019, 10:29 am
After editing the decibel level
I feel like I am hearing some digital sibilance
Is that normal after amplification?
Is it caused mainly by amplification?
Is the best way to deal with that by recording at the proper levels?
I hesitate to give a definite answer here because it depends on the individual case. I don't believe that amplifying would create any sibilance, but may highlight any that is there. So yes, recording at the proper levels may help. I know for me, I have sibilance even when recording at the proper levels, so I use Audacity's de-esser program (click here to download). Other people have better success with other programs but this one suits my needs.

Let me know if you have more questions!
Campbell
Constructive criticism always welcome

Readers wanted: The Cliff-Dwellers

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