The first test [OK]

All languages: post your test recording here. Help check audio files, provide editing services, and advertise for proof-listeners.
AnaLuca
Posts: 11
Joined: December 18th, 2017, 10:24 am

Post by AnaLuca » December 20th, 2017, 3:45 pm

Hello everybody,

I wish to submit my short test:

viewforum.php?f=21


I recorded it using Audacity, my operating system is Windows and the microphone is USB plugged.
It is the mic incorporated in the Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920.


I will attend your comments.

Best regards!

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » December 20th, 2017, 3:54 pm

Hi! You posted a link to the forum rather than to your test. Do you still have the uploader page on your screen to copy/paste the MP3 link?
Original journals on the Exploration of the Mississippi: Here
Fiction, partly about jail atrocities: It Is Never too Late
Watergate Report, volume 2: Here

AnaLuca
Posts: 11
Joined: December 18th, 2017, 10:24 am

Post by AnaLuca » December 31st, 2017, 5:00 am

Sorry,

I've been away for the holidays.

Here is the link:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/anal ... ilarie.wav


Thank you.

moniaqua
Posts: 465
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Location: Somewhere in the south

Post by moniaqua » December 31st, 2017, 6:45 am

AnaLuca wrote: I've been away for the holidays.
That's ok. I hope you had nice holydays :)

Wonderful reading; although I did understand only some words :), but that for sure wasn't your diction, which was very clear, but my not existent knowledge of the language :)

There are some issues to be adressed, but don't worry, we'll get it together :)

- the track is in stereo, LibriVox requires mono.
-the file is .wav, LibriVox requires .mp3 with a bitrate of 128 kbps
- the volume is up to high. You're at around 95 dB, LibrVox aims at 87 to 91 dB
- there is some noise. I'll look at it what to do about that

I'll just make some printscreens and be back to show you how to deal with the stuff :)

moniaqua
Posts: 465
Joined: April 11th, 2013, 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in the south

Post by moniaqua » December 31st, 2017, 7:55 am

Hi AnaLuca,

now, I work with Audacity 2.2.1, so if you use Audacity 2.1.x, your screens may differ a little bit, but not that bad, you should be able to see what I mean.

Stereo - mono

For future recordings, you can go to Edit -> Preferences, there, under Devices you can choose 1 Channel and mono:
Image
You can also choose it (for only one recording) in the toolbar, besides the little microphone

For now, you can just edit it in Tracks -> Mix -> Mix stereo down to mono

Volume:

There is a nice little plugin called "replay gain" for Audacity. How to install you see at http://www.audacityteam.org/download/plug-ins/ You can find the plugin under http://forum.audacityteam.org/download/file.php?id=4685

It said to amplify the file -6,7 dB, so I went to Effects -> Amplify
Image
and wrote the 6,7 into the first field, Amplification
leave the other fields just untouched/unchecked and press ok.

Notice the different height of the waves in the first picture of this post (right volume) and the one here:
Image (too loud)
the top of the waves should be only shortly above 0,5 dB.

Noise

The noise that I hear seems to come either from the fan of your PC or some other appliance. I could soften it with noise removal (I'll address that in an instant) but it would be easier and better for the reading of you could prevent it already on recording. You could, as it is on usb, put the microphone further away from the PC if it's the fan of your PC. If it's some other appliance, is it possible to switch that off while recording?

To edit the noise, mark a tiny bit of the recording with only noise go to Effects -> Noise removal and click Get noise profile
Than mark the whole recording, go to Effects -> Noise removal again and apply the tool. The values I took worked not to bad :)
Image

Export / File format

For exporting the file, in the window that appears after going to File -> export there is a button to choose the file format. Click it and find mp3.
Then choose the bitrate under "Quality" (in Audacity 2.1.3 it was "Options", I think)

Image

I also hear a lot of reverb in the recording. If you edited it in, it is not necessary, LibriVox prefers pretty dry recordings. If it was the room, do you have one with more carpets or so? If you don't get rid of the reverb, it is not that bad, I would have understood you very well if I spoke your language.

That should have been all :) Please either edit this file or record a new one if you want to catch the noise on recording, upload it and post it here in this thread again. Thank you :)

AnaLuca
Posts: 11
Joined: December 18th, 2017, 10:24 am

Post by AnaLuca » December 31st, 2017, 9:47 am

Thank you very much for all your advice.

Yes, the Audacity version I use is the same as yours, 2.2.1.

I switched from stereo to mono.
Of course, I can save the file in mp3 format, 128 kbps.
I set the recording volume at 90 db and added the "replay gain" plugin.
Honestly, I do not think there was any appliance working. The fan of the laptop is quite loud as it is an old computer.
I will keep the microphone as further away as possible from it.
No reverb was added to the recording. Hmm, the room is quite bit and I do not have a lot of furniture. I will try the kitchen.

I will upload another audio shortly.

Have a great New Year's Eve! :D

moniaqua
Posts: 465
Joined: April 11th, 2013, 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in the south

Post by moniaqua » December 31st, 2017, 10:23 am

AnaLuca wrote:The fan of the laptop is quite loud as it is an old computer.
I will keep the microphone as further away as possible from it.
Than it is probably this. It might already help a good deal to put the mic away; you might perhaps still want to do noise reduction, I can't really tell; checker isn't working for me so I can't tell you if it's necessary for LibriVox-Standars (usually I am a bit more picky than checker is :oops: )

I'll be off now until tomorrow I guess, they are already shooting fireworks :evil: and the dog is absolutely conviced that he has to comment every firecracker :( (it only happens twice a year, so it is impossible to train him on this).

Have a wonderful start into 2018 Image

MagicMan
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Post by MagicMan » December 31st, 2017, 11:46 am

AnaLuca wrote:Honestly, I do not think there was any appliance working. The fan of the laptop is quite loud as it is an old computer.
I will keep the microphone as further away as possible from it. No reverb was added to the recording. Hmm, the room is quite bit and I do not have a lot of furniture. I will try the kitchen. I will upload another audio shortly. Have a great New Year's Eve! :D
Hi, your problem is with your mic. I have the same web cam and they are famous for their mic sensitivity. Try this. Place a pillow behind the camera as close as you can while keeping the mic about 18 to 24 inches away from your face. This will greatly reduce the "Slap Back" from reverberating back into the mic from the rear wall.

If you go into the kitchen, it will probably be worse. If you have a closet you can record in, that would be great! If you need to have your computer close to you as you record, you may want to place a heavy beach towel over it, to tame it down a bit.

moniaqua
Posts: 465
Joined: April 11th, 2013, 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in the south

Post by moniaqua » December 31st, 2017, 2:28 pm

Hi @MagicMan,

thank you for that info about the mic.
MagicMan wrote: If you go into the kitchen, it will probably be worse.
Depends on the kitchen, I think. With a usual kitchen with lots of tiles I agree. If I look at the one in the house I am living though there is a lot of wood so here it would be just the same as the living room and I even can imagine a scenery so that it is actually better than a living room which is very empty.
If you have a closet you can record in, that would be great! If you need to have your computer close to you as you record, you may want to place a heavy beach towel over it, to tame it down a bit.
I am alway a bit scared with a towel over the PC. I can see the point that it damping the noise of the fan, but then the fan has a function and it doesn't really help to a long life of a PC when the hot air can't go away.

MagicMan
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Location: Northern Va.
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Post by MagicMan » December 31st, 2017, 3:09 pm

moniaqua wrote:Hi @MagicMan, thank you for that info about the mic.
You are very welcome!
MagicMan wrote: If you go into the kitchen, it will probably be worse.
moniaqua wrote:Depends on the kitchen, I think. With a usual kitchen with lots of tiles I agree. If I look at the one in the house I am living though there is a lot of wood so here it would be just the same as the living room and I even can imagine a scenery so that it is actually better than a living room which is very empty.
That's not really true. Every surface has a rating for audio reflection. Drywall is much denser and it is not nearly as reflective as wood. As far as the tile floor goes, that the best thing you can have. Carpet is the worst. That is why you never see carpet in professional recording studios. It will suck the higher frequencies right out of your recording. This is worse for women then men, as you guys usually have a higher pitched voice and it is deadly on higher pitched instruments. As far as drums go, you will always see carpet under the kit as it helps to make the lower freqs sound better.
MagicMan wrote:If you have a closet you can record in, that would be great! If you need to have your computer close to you as you record, you may want to place a heavy beach towel over it, to tame it down a bit.
moniaqua wrote:I am alway a bit scared with a towel over the PC. I can see the point that it damping the noise of the fan, but then the fan has a function and it doesn't really help to a long life of a PC when the hot air can't go away.
The suggestion was just to see if it would help remove the fan noise. I believe the OP stated that the computer was old and the fan was noisy. The mics in the C-90s are condensers. Condensers are made for studios. If it does help with the noise, the best thing to do is simply replace the fan. Depending on where the OP lives, you can get the Noctua NF-F12 PWM 120mm Case Fan for $19.00 from Amazon. It has a 5 star rating out of 899 reviews. It is whisper quite and designed for recording.

TriciaG
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Posts: 37346
Joined: June 15th, 2008, 10:30 pm
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Post by TriciaG » December 31st, 2017, 3:49 pm

Ana - you could try the kitchen, or you could just try stacking some pillows or towels behind and to the sides of your mic to cut down on the room echo reaching the mic. :) Personally, I'd be afraid of recording in the kitchen because of the noise of the refrigerator! :lol:

Feel free to experiment with different places. We're patient and are OK with listening to a bunch of recordings to see which is better. ;)
Original journals on the Exploration of the Mississippi: Here
Fiction, partly about jail atrocities: It Is Never too Late
Watergate Report, volume 2: Here

moniaqua
Posts: 465
Joined: April 11th, 2013, 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in the south

Post by moniaqua » January 1st, 2018, 9:35 am

MagicMan wrote: That's not really true. Every surface has a rating for audio reflection. Drywall is much denser and it is not nearly as reflective as wood. As far as the tile floor goes, that the best thing you can have. Carpet is the worst. That is why you never see carpet in professional recording studios. It will suck the higher frequencies right out of your recording. This is worse for women then men, as you guys usually have a higher pitched voice and it is deadly on higher pitched instruments. As far as drums go, you will always see carpet under the kit as it helps to make the lower freqs sound better.
I thought we were talking about reverb :hmm: But it is very interesting, I wasn't aware that carpet doesn't flatter female voices :)

@TriciaG, sometimes there are really silent fridges in kitchens ;) Meanwhile I am even looking in the kitchen and the room behind whether the dishwasher and the washer are still working, don't know why they are made that silent, it makes me nervous.
TriciaG wrote: Feel free to experiment with different places. We're patient and are OK with listening to a bunch of recordings to see which is better. ;)

That's definitely right :)

I've just had a look at that microphone, it's stereo, too. That might perhaps add to the effect a little bit (and explains the stereo - it doesn't make too much sense to record mono on a stereo mic, so you might want to mix it down)

I think the most practicable solution might be the pillow behind the mic.

MagicMan
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Contact:

Post by MagicMan » January 1st, 2018, 10:34 am

moniaqua wrote:
MagicMan wrote: That's not really true. Every surface has a rating for audio reflection. Drywall is much denser and it is not nearly as reflective as wood. As far as the tile floor goes, that the best thing you can have. Carpet is the worst. That is why you never see carpet in professional recording studios. It will suck the higher frequencies right out of your recording. This is worse for women then men, as you guys usually have a higher pitched voice and it is deadly on higher pitched instruments. As far as drums go, you will always see carpet under the kit as it helps to make the lower freqs sound better.
moniaqua wrote:I thought we were talking about reverb :hmm: But it is very interesting, I wasn't aware that carpet doesn't flatter female voices :)
Well, we are really saying the same thing, just in a different way. Sound waves can only do three things. Be absorbed, be diffused or be reflected. Diffusion and reflection is what added the split second sound waves back into your mic, referred to as "Slap Back", commonly called artificial reverberation, aka, reverb.

On the other hand, if you try and absorb 100% of reflection and diffusion, it is even worse believe it or not. It sounds very fake. The rule of thumb when designing professional recording studios is called the 33% rule and can be applied to your home studio as well. 33% absorption, 33% diffusion and 33% reflection.

If you have a bookcase in your recording area, but your back to it. Professional diffusers cost thousands of dollars and a bookcase works just about as good. Professional absorption panels cost around $700.00 each for a 2ft x 4ft section. You can spend $10.00 on pvc pipe, build a booth and use a heavy blanket or quilt to drape over it and do the same thing. Just doing those two things will improve your sound 100%. That's what walk in closets do as well.
I've just had a look at that microphone, it's stereo, too. That might perhaps add to the effect a little bit (and explains the stereo - it doesn't make too much sense to record mono on a stereo mic, so you might want to mix it down)
Yep, the c-90 has a mic on each side, but in reality, it will only record in mono. It just picks up twice as much slap back as having one condenser mic in the room.
I think the most practicable solution might be the pillow behind the mic.
It really is what works the best and this is why. As mentioned above, placing a pillow behind the mic, will absorb most of sound waves coming from your voice. If they are absorbed, they can not bounce around the room. Another neat little trick, is called close mic'ing. Keep that mic as close as you can to your mouth and you will require less gain and your head will block the sound waves from coming back into your mic. I am glad we are starting the new year off as friends! :thumbs:

AnaLuca
Posts: 11
Joined: December 18th, 2017, 10:24 am

Post by AnaLuca » January 6th, 2018, 4:16 pm

Thank you for taking the trouble to give me your advice...I was surprised.

I tried to apply all your suggestions. Here are the new tests:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/ro_kitchen_worked_on.mp3

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/eng_kitchen_worked_on.mp3


I do not think changing the room where I recorded the audios helped. I would judge, in the kitchen there is even more of a reverb, because of the tiles.

If the microphone is a problem, I could buy a new one.



I've never been a story teller but I'm sure I will get the hang of it.

Have a nice day!

MagicMan
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Post by MagicMan » January 6th, 2018, 4:38 pm

In my opinion, your mic is the problem and unless you do a lot of room treatment, it will never change. I highly suggest you purchase a ATR 2100 USB Dynamic mic for $64.00. It will cut down your reverb problems by 99%. I also agree with you, it is best to stay out of the kitchen when recording digital audio especially with a condenser mic. They are just way to sensitive for certain recording environments.

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