1-Minute Test Feedback, Please! [OK]

All languages: post your test recording here. Help check audio files, provide editing services, and advertise for proof-listeners.
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growlands
Posts: 13
Joined: March 11th, 2019, 1:08 pm

Post by growlands » March 13th, 2019, 12:28 pm

Hi, here's the link to my newbie test:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_growlands.mp3

My very basic setup: Audacity; Windows 10; Plantronics headset.

Any and all feedback welcome :)

Thanks,

Gareth

TwoFace
Posts: 14
Joined: March 12th, 2019, 10:56 am

Post by TwoFace » March 13th, 2019, 1:41 pm

Hey growlands !
First of all i really like your voice and expression :) The quality is good, no backround noise no hiss or static and actually better than i expected from a headset. Correct Bitrate but 3.1db too quiet (still in the desired range) for future recordings you could use this to set the volume to exactly 89 db https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Measuring_Volume_within_Audacity
Greetings Benni

growlands
Posts: 13
Joined: March 11th, 2019, 1:08 pm

Post by growlands » March 13th, 2019, 2:34 pm

Thanks so much for the kind words & suggestions, TwoFace, it's greatly appreciated!

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16165
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » March 14th, 2019, 1:33 am

Hi Gareth, welcome to LibriVox

I can fully second Benni's assessment of the test, your reading is very agreeable to listen to. I love the mellifluous voice and your enunciation is perfect to understand. :thumbs:

The settings are correct as well. The volume is at 86 dB, which is right at the lower end of our accepted range. We accept between 86 and 92 dB, with a preferred average of 89 dB. So this would get accepted, but 2 or 3 dB more would indeed be perfect.

To amplify in Audacity is easy:

> highlight your recording
> go to Effect
> go to Amplify
> input 2 (or whatever number you need) in the first upper slot (called "amplification dB")
> press ok

There is a nice tool to check your dB level before you upload any future recordings: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Checker

But nothing to change here for the test. I'll give you your official OK and you are free to roam the forum and claim in any project on offer. I'm sure you'll find something you like to start out with.

Have fun !

Sonia

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16165
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » March 15th, 2019, 12:24 am

wow I just saw that you are a Welsh speaker and have claimed the Welsh literature section in the World Library. :9: Big thanks for that. I wanted to claim this section, but couldn't find anybody to help me with the Welsh pronunciation. So I'm thrilled that we have you.

Excellent first choice. We try to finish this project during the March clean-up challenge, so it's great you're helping out there. :thumbs:

more about the Challenge here: viewtopic.php?f=24&t=74054

Sonia

TwoFace
Posts: 14
Joined: March 12th, 2019, 10:56 am

Post by TwoFace » March 15th, 2019, 5:46 am

Helô Gareth !
A welsh man who lived in Germany and now in America you are quite International :D
To answer your music question: I like to make lyrical rap that plays with words and language and uses old sould/jazz samples for the beat but i listen to a lot more like Folk, Funk, Jazz, Soul, Rock and Alternative :)
I second Kitty on the welsh ! I will be looking out for your work to maybe learn some welsh to add to my English Dialect skills. A lot of people say if i talk normally i sound like i am from London and i can do some Scottish too but Welsh and Irish are the hardest and i would love to conquer them too :)
Greetings Benni

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16165
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » March 15th, 2019, 5:49 am

TwoFace wrote:
March 15th, 2019, 5:46 am
maybe learn some welsh to add to my English Dialect skills. A lot of people say if i talk normally i sound like i am from London and i can do some Scottish too but Welsh and Irish are the hardest and i would love to conquer them too :)
Welsh and Irish Gaelic are not English dialects at all, but Celtic languages. I learnt two semesters of Gaelic at university and yes, it is difficult, and totally different from English ;)

but I love languages too, so I'm also always trying to learn new stuff. :9:

Sonia

growlands
Posts: 13
Joined: March 11th, 2019, 1:08 pm

Post by growlands » March 15th, 2019, 6:15 am

Hi, Sonja,

Thanks for the kind words :)

I'm not sure how great this particular recording will turn out. In common w/ much older material, there are so many mistakes in the writing that it's almost like a puzzle to work out what he really meant. Normally, I'd just turn to the original, but, you know, fidelity to the text...😀

It's so wonderful to be a part of this community. Everyone (so far!) has been so encouraging. It's a real throwback to the bulletin board days of the 'net - yes, I'm that old!

Thanks again,

Gareth

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16165
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » March 15th, 2019, 6:22 am

growlands wrote:
March 15th, 2019, 6:15 am
In common w/ much older material, there are so many mistakes in the writing that it's almost like a puzzle to work out what he really meant. Normally, I'd just turn to the original, but, you know, fidelity to the text...😀
well...yes we have to "read what the author wrote", but: if there are obvious typos in the text, you may correct them. Especially in Gutenberg texts, there happen scannos like "c-l" becoming a "d" for example. In such cases we can correct "the Scottish dans" into "the Scottish clans" for example ;) So if you find an obvious typo in the Welsh poetry, which changes the meaning drastically, I think you could read the "real thing". As long as it's only a word or so. Were there many errors ?
It's so wonderful to be a part of this community. Everyone (so far!) has been so encouraging. It's a real throwback to the bulletin board days of the 'net - yes, I'm that old!
What's a bulletin board ? (I'm probably not old enough :lol: )

Sonia

growlands
Posts: 13
Joined: March 11th, 2019, 1:08 pm

Post by growlands » March 15th, 2019, 7:06 am

Hi, Benni,

...and I didn't even mention living in Hungary and Greece :)

Your music sounds interesting, do you have it posted on SoundCloud or anywhere else? Like you, I listen to a wide variety of genres, though I'm most versed in folk, I suppose.

As for the Welsh, like Sonja said, it's a very different beast from English, but it's also different from the northern (Scots, Irish & Manx) Goidelic branch. Welsh is part of the southern, Brythonic branch, as is Cornish and Breton. (I've had very basic conversations with Bretons, me speaking Welsh and them speaking Breton - a lot of frustrating fun :) )

If you mean about learning accents, though, you'll have some fun there, although there are major differences in the north Walian and South Walian dialects (and definitely accents!).

One of the things I think is wrong with language teaching - or it was when i did it - was that we never taught students to recognize variations in accent. One of the things I'd do each semester for my grammar class (which is boring grammar, after all) was to start off the class in my normal accent, but then move through a wide variety of British accents. The looks on the faces, man, was priceless! it wasn't ever meant to be mean. I knew these people had probably better grammar and vocab than most native speakers, but they'd flounder because they could often not understand dialect / accent. I hope that's changed now, but i doubt it.

Anyway, sorry for the novella, got to go record some of that lovely misspelled Welsh now :)

Take care,

Gareth

growlands
Posts: 13
Joined: March 11th, 2019, 1:08 pm

Post by growlands » March 15th, 2019, 7:37 am

Hi, Sonja,

[ picks himself up from the floor after your last remark :) ]

That's good to know. The errors are so severe that I'm afraid I'll just have to read it as is and hope that a) no-one notices and b) that no-one I know ever hears it and thinks i can't read Welsh! I'm working my way through dictionaries, trying to work out what on earth some of them mean, but even with the English translations provided in the text, it's difficult. The trouble is, I can't tell if it's a Gutenberg issue, or if it's sloppy c19th work (my guess is the latter). Sorry, this will take a little longer than originally planned. The Scottish section should be done soon, at any rate.

Thanks (I think :) ) for the reply,

Gareth

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16165
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » March 15th, 2019, 7:48 am

growlands wrote:
March 15th, 2019, 7:37 am
Hi, Sonja,
btw it's Sonia with 'i' ;)
The errors are so severe that I'm afraid I'll just have to read it as is and hope that a) no-one notices and b) that no-one I know ever hears it and thinks i can't read Welsh! I'm working my way through dictionaries, trying to work out what on earth some of them mean, but even with the English translations provided in the text, it's difficult. The trouble is, I can't tell if it's a Gutenberg issue, or if it's sloppy c19th work (my guess is the latter).
I found the original scan, so you can compare. I fear it's sloppy author's work too :lol:

https://archive.org/details/libraryworldsbe79warngoog/page/n362

hope this helps

Sonia

growlands
Posts: 13
Joined: March 11th, 2019, 1:08 pm

Post by growlands » March 15th, 2019, 8:46 am

Thanks, Sonia - & sorry for the misspelling!

Gareth

TwoFace
Posts: 14
Joined: March 12th, 2019, 10:56 am

Post by TwoFace » March 15th, 2019, 5:24 pm

growlands wrote:
March 15th, 2019, 7:06 am
Hi, Benni,

...and I didn't even mention living in Hungary and Greece :)

Your music sounds interesting, do you have it posted on SoundCloud or anywhere else? Like you, I listen to a wide variety of genres, though I'm most versed in folk, I suppose.

As for the Welsh, like Sonja said, it's a very different beast from English, but it's also different from the northern (Scots, Irish & Manx) Goidelic branch. Welsh is part of the southern, Brythonic branch, as is Cornish and Breton. (I've had very basic conversations with Bretons, me speaking Welsh and them speaking Breton - a lot of frustrating fun :) )

If you mean about learning accents, though, you'll have some fun there, although there are major differences in the north Walian and South Walian dialects (and definitely accents!).

One of the things I think is wrong with language teaching - or it was when i did it - was that we never taught students to recognize variations in accent. One of the things I'd do each semester for my grammar class (which is boring grammar, after all) was to start off the class in my normal accent, but then move through a wide variety of British accents. The looks on the faces, man, was priceless! it wasn't ever meant to be mean. I knew these people had probably better grammar and vocab than most native speakers, but they'd flounder because they could often not understand dialect / accent. I hope that's changed now, but i doubt it.

Anyway, sorry for the novella, got to go record some of that lovely misspelled Welsh now :)

Take care,

Gareth
Hey Gareth i sent you a pm concerning the music :)
Yes i meant the accents/dialects, i don't want to learn a whole new language haha!
I am quite obsessed with imitating them and for example surprising native speakers and getting rid of the image that Germans have when it comes to speaking English. I love Limmys Show because it gets right to the edge of understandability https://youtu.be/l0f-2P3luxU
Scottish is just so fun to listen to. I don't think i ever consciously listened to welsh though and Irish just has something that makes it hard for me to imitate. I don't think that language teaching changed but thanks to the internet and video games i was in a big british community and because i heard different accents every day i kinda got used to them and started to go along with them and pick them up here and there. I think most people have difficulties with letting go of the way they speak and pronounce but once you let go and are open to moving your mouth and vocal cords in ways you never have before you realise how different speaking can be. Might be why i have become so interested in voice acting.
Greetings Benni

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