[Fortnightly Poetry] The Nymphs by Ivan Turgenev - dl

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aradlaw
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Post by aradlaw » November 15th, 2020, 9:34 am

The Nymphs by Ivan Turgenev (1818 - 1883). Translated by Constance Garnett (1861 - 1946)
Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev was a Russian novelist, short story writer, poet, playwright, translator and popularizer of Russian literature in the West.
Constance Clara Garnett was an English translator of nineteenth-century Russian literature. She was the first English translator of Dostoyevsky and Chekhov, and one of the first translators to render almost all works by Turgenev, Goncharov, Ostrovsky, Herzen, and Tolstoy into English. Altogether, she translated 71 volumes of Russian literature, many of which are still in print today. ( Wikipedia)
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This fortnight's poem can be found here.
[*] Project Code: 7Zf4KUHt

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Begin your reading with the abbreviated LibriVox disclaimer:
No more than 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning of the recording!
The Nymphs by Ivan Turgenev, and translated by Constance Garnett, read for LibriVox.org by [your name].
[Add, if you wish, date, your location, and/or your personal URL.]
Then read the poem:

I stood before a chain of beautiful mountains forming a semicircle. A young, green forest covered them from summit to base.

Limpidly blue above them was the southern sky; on the heights the sunbeams rioted; below, half-hidden in the grass, swift brooks were babbling.

And the old fable came to my mind, how in the first century after Christ’s birth, a Greek ship was sailing on the Aegean Sea.

The hour was mid-day.... It was still weather. And suddenly up aloft, above the pilot’s head, some one called distinctly, ‘When thou sailest by the island, shout in a loud voice, “Great Pan is dead!”’

The pilot was amazed ... afraid. But when the ship passed the island, he obeyed, he called, ‘Great Pan is dead!’

And, at once, in response to his shout, all along the coast (though the island was uninhabited), sounded loud sobs, moans, long-drawn-out, plaintive wailings. ‘Dead! dead is great Pan!’ I recalled this story ... and a strange thought came to. ‘What if I call an invocation?’

But in the sight of the exultant beauty around me, I could not think of death, and with all my might I shouted, ‘Great Pan is arisen! arisen!’ And at once, wonder of wonders, in answer to my call, from all the wide half-circle of green mountains came peals of joyous laughter, rose the murmur of glad voices and the clapping of hands. ‘He is arisen! Pan is arisen!’ clamoured fresh young voices. Everything before me burst into sudden laughter, brighter than the sun on high, merrier than the brooks that babbled among the grass. I heard the hurried thud of light steps, among the green undergrowth there were gleams of the marble white of flowing tunics, the living flush of bare limbs.... It was the nymphs, nymphs, dryads, Bacchantes, hastening from the heights down to the plain....

All at once they appear at every opening in the woods. Their curls float about their god-like heads, their slender hands hold aloft wreaths and cymbals, and laughter, sparkling, Olympian laughter, comes leaping, dancing with them....

Before them moves a goddess. She is taller and fairer than the rest; a quiver on her shoulder, a bow in her hands, a silvery crescent moon on her floating tresses....

‘Diana, is it thou?’

But suddenly the goddess stopped ... and at once all the nymphs following her stopped. The ringing laughter died away.

I see the face of the hushed goddess overspread with a deadly pallor; I saw her feet grew rooted to the ground, her lips parted in unutterable horror; her eyes grew wide, fixed on the distance ... What had she seen? What was she gazing upon?

I turned where she was gazing ...

And on the distant sky-line, above the low strip of fields, gleamed, like a point of fire the golden cross on the white bell-tower of a Christian church.... That cross the goddess had caught sight of.

I heard behind me a long, broken sigh, like the quiver of a broken string, and when I turned again, no trace was left of the nymphs.... The broad forest was green as before, and only here and there among the thick network of branches, were fading gleams of something white; whether the nymphs’ white robes, or a mist rising from the valley, I know not.

But how I mourned for those vanished goddesses!

Dec. 1878.


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Post by grs2905 » November 16th, 2020, 6:25 am


aradlaw
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Post by aradlaw » November 16th, 2020, 4:04 pm

Thank you Graham. :thumbs:
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Post by brucek » November 17th, 2020, 8:23 am


aradlaw
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Post by aradlaw » November 17th, 2020, 8:39 am

Thank you Bruce. :thumbs:
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Post by aradlaw » November 17th, 2020, 10:29 am

Here's my reading, if someone could please PL...
https://librivox.org/uploads/aradlaw/nymphs_turgenev_dl_128kb.mp3
2:33
David Lawrence

* Weekly & Fortnightly Poetry - Check out the Short Works forum for the latest projects!

GregGiordano
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Post by GregGiordano » November 17th, 2020, 9:14 pm

Here is my contribution to this project:

https://librivox.org/uploads/aradlaw/nymphs_turgenev_gg_128kb.mp3

Run time is 4:57

Take care,

Greg

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » November 18th, 2020, 11:09 am

.. and here's mine:

https://librivox.org/uploads/aradlaw/nymphs_turgenev_py_128kb.mp3
(4.38)

Odd that he invokes Pan but gets Diana ...

EDIT: ... and your recording is PL okay, David. BTW: the length of your recording is 4.33, not 2.33.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

aradlaw
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Post by aradlaw » November 18th, 2020, 1:29 pm

Thank you Greg and Peter. :thumbs:

Thanks for the PL Peter, time changed. :)
David Lawrence

* Weekly & Fortnightly Poetry - Check out the Short Works forum for the latest projects!

GregGiordano
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Post by GregGiordano » November 18th, 2020, 9:10 pm

aradlaw wrote:
November 18th, 2020, 1:29 pm
Thank you Greg and Peter. :thumbs:

Thanks for the PL Peter, time changed. :)
Thank you, David!

Darren
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Post by Darren » November 20th, 2020, 2:39 pm

Hi, here is my recording, with a runtime of 4:50 https://librivox.org/uploads/aradlaw/nymphs_turgenev_dpk_128kb.mp3
Please let me know if anything else is needed. I can be credited as Darren Kurtz in the catalog.

aradlaw
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Post by aradlaw » November 20th, 2020, 7:22 pm

Welcome to LibriVox Darren :D good first reading. :thumbs:
You can view your brand new LV Catalog page by clicking your forum name in the Magic Window.
David Lawrence

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Post by pschempf » November 21st, 2020, 4:59 pm

Fritz

"A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labors of a spasmodic Hercules."

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aradlaw
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Post by aradlaw » November 21st, 2020, 7:09 pm

Thank you Phil. :thumbs:
David Lawrence

* Weekly & Fortnightly Poetry - Check out the Short Works forum for the latest projects!

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