Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 078 - jo

Short Poetry Collections, Short Story Collections, and our Weekly Poetry Project
Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 13th, 2020, 5:22 pm

Note: knotyouraveragejo is Metacoordinator (MC); Sue Anderson is Book Coordinator (BC); Soupy is Dedicated Proof Listener (DPL)

Short Nonfiction Collection Vol. 078

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short nonfiction works in English which are in the Public Domain (generally meaning that they were published prior to 1924). Nonfiction includes essays and speeches; letters and diaries; biography and history; film, book and music reviews; descriptions of travel, politics and sports; instructional manuals, even a favorite recipe from a public domain cookbook! Your nonfiction recording can be on any topic. Some suggestions for source material can be found here.

Please select and record any short nonfiction piece in the public domain. For clarification of what it means for a work to be "in the public domain," see this section of the LibriVox Wiki: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Copyright_and_Public_Domain. Try to stay with works that run less than 60 minutes [74 minutes is the absolute max]. You may read a maximum of 2 selections per volume. There is no need to "sign-up" before recording; as long as the work is clearly in the public domain. Multiple versions are welcome, so don't worry whether someone else has recorded your selection already; we're happy to hear your version too. :)

After 20 recordings are submitted, we will prooflisten, catalog and make them available to the public.

Basic Recording Guide: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Newbie_Guide_to_Recording

1. RECORD:
  • Be sure to set your recording software to: 44100Hz, 16 or 32-bit.
  • At the BEGINNING say: "[Title of Work], by [Author Name]" "This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit Librivox.org"
  • At the END, say: "End of [Title], by [Author Name]"
  • If you wish, you may also say: "Read by...your name."
  • Please leave no more than 1 second of silence at the beginning of your recording. Add about 5 seconds of silence at the end of your recording.
2. EDIT and SAVE your file:
  • Need noise-cleaning? See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide.
  • Save or export your recording to an mp3 file at 128kbs. The uploader will add the mp.3 to the end of your file name when it uploads. Please use the format shown. Your file name should have this format before you upload it:

    snf078_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb

    After it is uploaded, it should have this format:
    https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf078_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb.mp3
  • Keep the file name short! Use just a word or two to identfy the title. Omit "a," "the," etc. Don't put spaces between words. Keep everything lower case. Even your initials should be lower case. The only underscores should be the separations between the snf volume, title, author's last name, and your initials. There are only 4 underscores in a file name!
3. UPLOAD your recording:
  • Upload your finished recording using the LibriVox uploader: http://librivox.org/login/uploader. When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - copy and post it to the current nonfiction thread. If you don't post that you've uploaded your recording, the nonfiction book coordinator won't know that you did it!
    Image
  • If you have trouble reading the image above, please send a private message to any admin.
  • To upload, you'll need to select the MC, which for the Short Nonfiction Collection is: knotyouraveragejo
  • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page
4. POST the following information in this thread:
  • Title of the work.
  • Author of the work.
  • The link to your file you copied from the uploader.
  • A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL). NOTE: If posting from Gutenberg, please provide the link to the download page, e.g. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/# (where # is the Gutenberg project number for the book).
  • Length in minutes.
  • If this is your first Librivox recording, we will also need your name as you would like it to appear in the LibriVox catalog, and, if you have a web page and want it linked to your name in the catalog, the URL of the web page.
5. PROOF LISTENING AND DEADLINE FOR EDITS on recordings you have submitted:
  • We ask that you complete any editing requested by the Dedicated Proof Listener within two weeks of the request, or, if you need more time, that you post in this thread to request an extension. There’s no shame in this; we’re all volunteers and things happen. Extensions are, however, at the discretion of the Book Coordinator. To be fair to the other readers, sections which cannot be edited in a timely manner will be deleted from the current volume of the Nonfiction Collection, but they can always be included in a future volume when the edits are complete.

Magic Window:



BC Admin

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 13th, 2020, 5:22 pm

Welcome to the 78th volume of the Short Nonfiction Collection. This is a place to share a special interest by recording a short work of public domain nonfiction. If you haven't something already in mind that you'd like to record, there are many bookshelves at Gutenberg.org to explore http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Category:Bookshelf. The bookshelves for Countries, Education, Fine Arts, History, Music, Periodicals, and Technology are some places to start.

Hathi Trust and Archive.org are good resources:

https://archive.org/
https://www.hathitrust.org/

The Online Books Page has over 2 million PD listings! It was suggested by Soupy (Craig), our Dedicated Proof Listener.
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/lists.html

The Biodiversity Heritage Library is a great source for natural history. It was suggested by LibriVoxer MillionMoments. http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

The Linda Hall Science, Engineering, and Technology Library has some unique items in its Digital Collection https://www.lindahall.org/collections/

Sourcing your recording from Wikisource is NOT recommended.

If you have any doubts about the public domain status of anything you want to read for the collection, please feel free to post the source along with your query in the thread, and I will be glad to help you! Thanks!

Please note: There is a limit of two selections per reader for this volume of Short Nonfiction.

Please check the "vitals" of your recording with Checker https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Checker before sending it up to the Nonfiction Collection! :) Checker is an easy to use "open source tool that looks for common problems with recordings for LibriVox... Checker saves time by checking contributions for common issues before files are uploaded." Thanks! :) :)

Sue (Book Coordinator, Short Nonfiction Collection)

wwhite
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Joined: March 10th, 2015, 12:54 pm

Post by wwhite » October 15th, 2020, 4:14 pm

Hi all,

I'd like to read the chapter of the Malleus Maleficarum pertaining to the deeds of witches working as midwives (Part I, Chapter or Question XIII). First published in 1487, the Latin was translated to English by Montegue Summers (published 1928) who died in 1948. If I have the rules right, add 70 to the translator's death year and that's 2018.

Available here: http://www.malleusmaleficarum.org/downloads/MalleusAcrobat.pdf

Assuming it's public domain, is this chapter from a larger text suitable for this category of "short nonfiction"? It's only a few pages.

Historically, I believe this chapter was especially pernicious due to the deaths of many midwives, the reduced practice of midwifery because any problem with a birth could lead to the midwife being killed for a witch, and the subsequent suffering and deaths of pregnant women and infants who lacked knowledgeable midwives.

Thanks!
Wanda White

Availle
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Post by Availle » October 15th, 2020, 7:23 pm

Hi Sue,

let's start this one off with

The Lake Biwa-Kioto Canal, Japan
by Sakuro Tanabe (1861 - 1944)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanabe_Sakuro

from Scientific American Volume 75 Number 19 (November 1896)
https://archive.org/details/scientific-american-1896-11-07/mode/1up

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf078_lakebiwakiotocanal_tanabe_ava_128kb.mp3
Length: 16:09

The canal was closed for transport in 1951. However, a few years back it got revived, and now you can take a pleasure cruise in spring and autumn. Which I have done 2 weeks ago and it was wonderful! :9: More info and lots of pics here:
https://biwakososui.kyoto.travel/en/
Cheers, Ava.
Resident witch of LibriVox. "I ain't Nice."

--
AvailleAudio.com

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 16th, 2020, 5:20 am

wwhite wrote:
October 15th, 2020, 4:14 pm
Hi all,

I'd like to read the chapter of the Malleus Maleficarum pertaining to the deeds of witches working as midwives (Part I, Chapter or Question XIII). First published in 1487, the Latin was translated to English by Montegue Summers (published 1928) who died in 1948. If I have the rules right, add 70 to the translator's death year and that's 2018.

Available here: http://www.malleusmaleficarum.org/downloads/MalleusAcrobat.pdf

Assuming it's public domain, is this chapter from a larger text suitable for this category of "short nonfiction"? It's only a few pages.

Historically, I believe this chapter was especially pernicious due to the deaths of many midwives, the reduced practice of midwifery because any problem with a birth could lead to the midwife being killed for a witch, and the subsequent suffering and deaths of pregnant women and infants who lacked knowledgeable midwives.

Thanks!
Wanda White
Hi Wanda,

Thanks for your interest in the Short Nonfiction Collection. It's always a good idea to check with us, as you have done, if you're unsure whether what you want to read is, indeed, in the Public Domain.

LibriVox follows U.S. copyright laws, a summary of which you can find in the LibriVox Wiki here:
https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Copyright_and_Public_Domain. In the U.S., copyright has expired only on works "published in 1924 or earlier," which would rule out a book published in 1928. Montegue's translation was published in Britain in 1928. It might be out of copyright in Britain, following copyright rules there. But copyright rules differ from country to country, and LibriVox must follow U.S. copyright laws because our server is located in the U.S.

Your topic sounds quite interesting, and hopefully you can find something to read about midwives and accusations of witchery that is in the U.S. Public Domain. To answer your question about suitability, an excerpt or chapter from a larger work is fine to read for the Nonfiction Collection.

Sue Anderson
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Location: Midwest, USA
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 16th, 2020, 6:53 am

Availle wrote:
October 15th, 2020, 7:23 pm
Hi Sue,

let's start this one off with

The Lake Biwa-Kioto Canal, Japan
by Sakuro Tanabe (1861 - 1944)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanabe_Sakuro

from Scientific American Volume 75 Number 19 (November 1896)
https://archive.org/details/scientific-american-1896-11-07/mode/1up

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf078_lakebiwakiotocanal_tanabe_ava_128kb.mp3
Length: 16:09

The canal was closed for transport in 1951. However, a few years back it got revived, and now you can take a pleasure cruise in spring and autumn. Which I have done 2 weeks ago and it was wonderful! :9: More info and lots of pics here:
https://biwakososui.kyoto.travel/en/
Hi Availle, Thanks for getting Vol. 078 off to a such a good start with this reading about the Lake Biwa-Kioto Canal! :D It's nice that the canal has been repurposed to good use as a tourist attraction. I looked at the video link you provided. The beautiful vistas of flowering trees along the canal made me wistful, as here, where I live in the Midwest U.S.A., winter is close at hand and there are many long months of cold and snow ahead of us before we see trees in bloom again here!

soupy
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Post by soupy » October 16th, 2020, 2:34 pm

Thanks Availle :thumbs:

Japan industrializing through water and electricity.

one error noted:

14:21 The branch canal at the head of the inclined plane -- some repetition

Craig
The task of life should last as long as life lasts, that is the task of living.

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Steven Seitel
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Post by Steven Seitel » October 17th, 2020, 2:01 pm

Hi, all...

I offer for inclusion this fascinating short tract that appeared in the Chicago Daily Socialist in 1910. Author McCarty has cleverly culled quotations from Abraham Lincoln and assembled them into a passionate defense of the working man (Labor) against exploitation by the wealthy few (Capitalists). While Socialism per se may be largely out of favor in the United States, still the quotations by Honest Abe resonate today, given the present great disparity in distribution of wealth.

Title: Little Sermons in Socialism
Author: Burke McCarty
Text: https://archive.org/details/littlesermonsins00mcca/mode/2up
File: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf078_sermonssocialism_mccarty_ss_128kb.mp3
Duration 20:04

Steven Seitel
Steven Seitel

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 17th, 2020, 3:52 pm

Steven Seitel wrote:
October 17th, 2020, 2:01 pm
Hi, all...

I offer for inclusion this fascinating short tract that appeared in the Chicago Daily Socialist in 1910. Author McCarty has cleverly culled quotations from Abraham Lincoln and assembled them into a passionate defense of the working man (Labor) against exploitation by the wealthy few (Capitalists). While Socialism per se may be largely out of favor in the United States, still the quotations by Honest Abe resonate today, given the present great disparity in distribution of wealth.

Title: Little Sermons in Socialism
Author: Burke McCarty
Text: https://archive.org/details/littlesermonsins00mcca/mode/2up
File: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf078_sermonssocialism_mccarty_ss_128kb.mp3
Duration 20:04

Steven Seitel
Hi Steven, Welcome to the Short Nonfiction Collection! :D Thank you for this little tract, combining quotes from Lincoln with commentary by Burke McCarty. It's an interesting amalgam, although I will say it brought to mind what Dr. Fauci said recently: "The comments attributed to me without my permission...were taken out of context."

I see that Burke McCarty maintained a decidedly far out conspiracy theory about Lincoln's assassination: https://books.google.com/books?id=OKmNQrTfYfUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22Burke+McCarty%22&hl=en&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiXt7Wg1rzsAhVJ2qwKHbgyAkMQ6AEwAHoECAIQAg#v=onepage&q&f=false


Thanks for contributing to Vol. 078! :D

Steven Seitel
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Location: Montana USA

Post by Steven Seitel » October 17th, 2020, 4:25 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
October 17th, 2020, 3:52 pm

...although I will say it brought to mind what Dr. Fauci said recently: "The comments attributed to me without my permission...were taken out of context."
Yes, an interesting example of how one might manufacture support for almost any cause, reputable or no, by cherry picking from unimpeachable sources. Jim Garrison would approve the technique.

S
Steven Seitel

soupy
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Post by soupy » October 17th, 2020, 6:55 pm

Thanks for Little Sermons in Socialism - culled from quotes from Loncoln.
Well read :D
PLOK :thumbs:

"The 'Mudsill' Theory," by James Henry Hammond Speech to the U.S. Senate, March 4, 1858
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h3439t.html

Craig
The task of life should last as long as life lasts, that is the task of living.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

Vietnam: The Advisory Years to 1965

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david wales
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Location: Los Angeles

Post by david wales » October 18th, 2020, 10:35 am

Peace, David

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 18th, 2020, 12:32 pm

david wales wrote:
October 18th, 2020, 10:35 am
The Altar Of Freedom (1917)
Mary Roberts Rinehart
Link to file: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf078_altarfreedom_rinehart_dw_128kb.mp3
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/63490

Length: 32.40
Hi David,

Hi David, Thanks for your contribution to vol. 078. :) I see that Mary Roberts Rinehart was both a mystery novelist and a war correspondent in Belgium in WWI.

Reinhart seemed, to me, to present a mixed message in The Altar of Freedom. When she writes about women's patriotic duty to send their sons off to war, she gushes with sentimentality. On the other hand, she pounds home her hard headed beliefs about what she thinks it would take to win the war against Germany --advocating universal conscription for instance ["...if in this war we allow the few to fight for us, then as a nation we have died and our ideals have died with us...I cover my eyes and see that gallant little first army of England, springing to the call, and facing, without hope, the great trained German army. It was the best England had, and it is gone, almost to a man--because the mothers of England had not insisted that every man in the empire bear his share."]

In any case, Mary Roberts Rinehart sounds like an interesting writer!

david wales
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Location: Los Angeles

Post by david wales » October 18th, 2020, 3:15 pm

Hi Sue, Yes, Rinehart was a very popular writer in her day. Besides novels and short stories, she wrote some travel stuff, especially about camping with her family in wilderness. I recorded a couple of those books. You're right, she's not always the most consistent writer around.
Peace, David

soupy
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Post by soupy » October 18th, 2020, 6:50 pm

Thanks for The Altar of Freedom David :D

Well read.

PLOK :thumbs:

Craig
The task of life should last as long as life lasts, that is the task of living.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

Vietnam: The Advisory Years to 1965

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

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