[POETRY] The Psalmes of David by Sir Philip Sidney & Mary Sidney Herbert - tg

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TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » October 10th, 2020, 3:34 pm

Mystery/PulpFic: Dope, by Sax Rohmer
The one that started them all: Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles
Elizabethan Poetry: The Psalmes of David
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Short essays: Elia, and The Last Essays of Elia

alanmapstone
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Location: Oxford

Post by alanmapstone » October 11th, 2020, 2:04 am

Psalm 133

https://librivox.org/uploads/triciag/psalmesofdavid_133_sidney_128kb.mp3
1:10

I will pick out a few more later :)
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » October 11th, 2020, 4:33 pm

alanmapstone wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 2:04 am
Psalm 133

https://librivox.org/uploads/triciag/psalmesofdavid_133_sidney_128kb.mp3
1:10

I will pick out a few more later :)
PL OK. Thanks!
Mystery/PulpFic: Dope, by Sax Rohmer
The one that started them all: Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles
Elizabethan Poetry: The Psalmes of David
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Short essays: Elia, and The Last Essays of Elia

Owlivia
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Joined: June 3rd, 2020, 10:29 am

Post by Owlivia » October 11th, 2020, 4:54 pm

TriciaG wrote:
October 10th, 2020, 3:34 pm
Owlivia wrote:
October 10th, 2020, 2:50 pm
And we now CAN say, Lo, Here it endeth! :wink:
Thanks! All PL OK. And thanks for not throwing anything at me for being picky. :lol:
:lol:

I appreciate your stickler-hood, as I took these on as a challenge (which they Definitely were). :shock:

Any idea why all those "th's" were so frequent during the Elizabethan age? Apparently some believe it came from an effort to sound "French" and thus part of the in-crowd. My personal (unsubstantiated) theory is that Some Important Person (QEI herself?) had loose dentures -- which would create a not-dissimilar sound. Serious question.

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » October 11th, 2020, 5:01 pm

I have no idea! :)
Mystery/PulpFic: Dope, by Sax Rohmer
The one that started them all: Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles
Elizabethan Poetry: The Psalmes of David
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Short essays: Elia, and The Last Essays of Elia

adrianstephens
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Post by adrianstephens » October 11th, 2020, 11:13 pm

Could you please assign me the first 5 opens? Thanks.
My Librivox-related YouTube series starts here: Part 0: Introduction. https://youtu.be/pMHYycgA5VU
...
Part 15: Case Study (Poem) https://youtu.be/41sr_VC1Qxo
Part 16: Case Study 2 (Dramatic Reading) https://youtu.be/GBIAd469vnM

alanmapstone
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Location: Oxford

Post by alanmapstone » October 12th, 2020, 5:44 am

Can I add 120 122 123 128 129?
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » October 12th, 2020, 6:10 am

Owlivia wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 4:54 pm
Any idea why all those "th's" were so frequent during the Elizabethan age? Apparently some believe it came from an effort to sound "French" and thus part of the in-crowd. My personal (unsubstantiated) theory is that Some Important Person (QEI herself?) had loose dentures -- which would create a not-dissimilar sound. Serious question.
Verbs ending "eth" are the 2nd person singular of traditional English Grammar (I go, thou goeth, he goes) We don't use the 2nd person singular these days but the Elizabethans did.
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » October 12th, 2020, 6:21 am

adrianstephens wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 11:13 pm
Could you please assign me the first 5 opens? Thanks.
Done! 6,7,19,22,24
Mystery/PulpFic: Dope, by Sax Rohmer
The one that started them all: Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles
Elizabethan Poetry: The Psalmes of David
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Short essays: Elia, and The Last Essays of Elia

TriciaG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 47799
Joined: June 15th, 2008, 10:30 pm
Location: Toronto, ON (but Minnesotan to age 32)

Post by TriciaG » October 12th, 2020, 6:21 am

alanmapstone wrote:
October 12th, 2020, 5:44 am
Can I add 120 122 123 128 129?
Done!
Mystery/PulpFic: Dope, by Sax Rohmer
The one that started them all: Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles
Elizabethan Poetry: The Psalmes of David
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Short essays: Elia, and The Last Essays of Elia

adrianstephens
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Joined: August 27th, 2019, 5:06 am
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Post by adrianstephens » October 13th, 2020, 1:34 am

My Librivox-related YouTube series starts here: Part 0: Introduction. https://youtu.be/pMHYycgA5VU
...
Part 15: Case Study (Poem) https://youtu.be/41sr_VC1Qxo
Part 16: Case Study 2 (Dramatic Reading) https://youtu.be/GBIAd469vnM

TriciaG
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Posts: 47799
Joined: June 15th, 2008, 10:30 pm
Location: Toronto, ON (but Minnesotan to age 32)

Post by TriciaG » October 13th, 2020, 7:41 am

Psalm 6:

1:45 - "Get henee, you evil" - I think this is supposed to be "get hence" (one of those c's that look like an e)

2:00 - "The Lord my suite did hear" - this is "suit" like in a lawsuit. Your choice if you want to change the pronunciation. :)

"and from this ougly fall" - that's certainly a new one! (No PL note, just a comment)

Psalm 7:

3:07 - "and his own ill his own head shall appall" - I hear "his own will"

(ALMOST got through without a PL note!)

Psalm 19:

2:41 - "who is the man, that ever can | his faults know" - I hear "ever een" (e for a c)

3:16 - "so let words sprong from my weak tongue" - I hear "spring" (wouldn't have mentioned it except it breaks the rhyme)

Psalm 22:

3;07 - "my fainting feet they pearced" - I hear "peered" (e for a c)
3:08 (since you're there anyway) - "they looke" - I hear "they looked"

Psalm 24:
PL OK!

Putting you in for the next 5...

Definitely some interesting words in that one - something like "iustice" for "justice", and a Vnicorn!
Mystery/PulpFic: Dope, by Sax Rohmer
The one that started them all: Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles
Elizabethan Poetry: The Psalmes of David
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Short essays: Elia, and The Last Essays of Elia

Owlivia
Posts: 309
Joined: June 3rd, 2020, 10:29 am

Post by Owlivia » October 13th, 2020, 12:45 pm

alanmapstone wrote:
October 12th, 2020, 6:10 am
Owlivia wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 4:54 pm
Any idea why all those "th's" were so frequent during the Elizabethan age? Apparently some believe it came from an effort to sound "French" and thus part of the in-crowd. My personal (unsubstantiated) theory is that Some Important Person (QEI herself?) had loose dentures -- which would create a not-dissimilar sound. Serious question.
Verbs ending "eth" are the 2nd person singular of traditional English Grammar (I go, thou goeth, he goes) We don't use the 2nd person singular these days but the Elizabethans did.
:)
Hi, Alan, and thank you for the reply. It is such a curious sound, the ending "eth," and especially challenging to pronounce when preceding another "th" such as "thou doth therefore..." I imagine it kept out the riffraff, as Basil Fawlty would say. :lol:

best,
Owlivia/Deborah


adrianstephens
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Post by adrianstephens » October 14th, 2020, 12:19 am

TriciaG wrote:
October 13th, 2020, 7:41 am
Psalm 6:

1:45 - "Get henee, you evil" - I think this is supposed to be "get hence" (one of those c's that look like an e)

2:00 - "The Lord my suite did hear" - this is "suit" like in a lawsuit. Your choice if you want to change the pronunciation. :)

"and from this ougly fall" - that's certainly a new one! (No PL note, just a comment)

Psalm 7:

3:07 - "and his own ill his own head shall appall" - I hear "his own will"

(ALMOST got through without a PL note!)

Psalm 19:

2:41 - "who is the man, that ever can | his faults know" - I hear "ever een" (e for a c)

3:16 - "so let words sprong from my weak tongue" - I hear "spring" (wouldn't have mentioned it except it breaks the rhyme)

Psalm 22:

3;07 - "my fainting feet they pearced" - I hear "peered" (e for a c)
3:08 (since you're there anyway) - "they looke" - I hear "they looked"


Definitely some interesting words in that one - something like "iustice" for "justice", and a Vnicorn!
Thanks, Tricia, I was admittedly somewhat supprised to find a Vnicorn there!
https://librivox.org/uploads/triciag/psalmesofdavid_006_sidney_128kb.mp3
https://librivox.org/uploads/triciag/psalmesofdavid_007_sidney_128kb.mp3
https://librivox.org/uploads/triciag/psalmesofdavid_019_sidney_128kb.mp3
https://librivox.org/uploads/triciag/psalmesofdavid_022_sidney_128kb.mp3

I'm coming round to your point of view. This is a thorough mangling.
My Librivox-related YouTube series starts here: Part 0: Introduction. https://youtu.be/pMHYycgA5VU
...
Part 15: Case Study (Poem) https://youtu.be/41sr_VC1Qxo
Part 16: Case Study 2 (Dramatic Reading) https://youtu.be/GBIAd469vnM

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