[OPEN] Short Ghost and Horror Story Collection Vol. 035 -rap

Short Poetry Collections, Short Story Collections, and our Weekly Poetry Project
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Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » August 5th, 2019, 12:16 am

maxgal wrote:
August 3rd, 2019, 8:45 pm
...so I think a good place to split "Lot No. 249" would be at the end of the paragraph on the top of the second column on p.535, ending with the words "...why I should steer clear of him in the future."
This is just about at the halfway point, and is at a break of time in the story.
https://archive.org/details/1892lotno249doyleharpersmagsept/page/n9
WDYT?
Thank you...LJB
Ha! You're right! I'd say the author intented it to be a two-part story like that! :D

Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » August 5th, 2019, 12:17 am

brockprice wrote:
August 3rd, 2019, 5:00 am
Another story for PL'ing! Another case for The Thinking Machine!
  • Author: Jacques Futrelle
  • Title: The First Problem
  • Runtime: 27:42
Thanks!
Brilliant! I've entered it into the Magic Window, ready for PL!
Thank you!!

Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » August 5th, 2019, 12:29 am

ryfink wrote:
August 4th, 2019, 11:37 am
Ghost of Dr. Harris by Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Duration: 15:06

Link to full text: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015080471876&view=1up&seq=3
Link to audio: https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ghohor035_ghostofdrharris_hawthorne_rf_128kb.mp3

I ended up reading off of the text that I said was a bit difficult to read (it was in a small window). I did this because I couldn't find it on Gutenberg or any of the other main public domain sources.

Please let me know if my recording is sufficient.

Thanks! :thumbs:
Thank you for persevering through the difficult text! Now I've entered it into the Magic Window, ready for proof-listening. :thumbs:

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 5th, 2019, 9:16 am

Rapunzelina wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 12:16 am
maxgal wrote:
August 3rd, 2019, 8:45 pm
...so I think a good place to split "Lot No. 249" would be at the end of the paragraph on the top of the second column on p.535, ending with the words "...why I should steer clear of him in the future."
This is just about at the halfway point, and is at a break of time in the story.
https://archive.org/details/1892lotno249doyleharpersmagsept/page/n9
WDYT?
Thank you...LJB
Ha! You're right! I'd say the author intented it to be a two-part story like that! :D
Will do...LJB :mrgreen:
Louise
"every little breeze..."

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 7th, 2019, 6:41 pm

Here is my first one for this collection:
https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ghohor035_manoverboard_churchill_ljb_128kb.mp3
Text: https://archive.org/details/1898manoverboardchurchhill
Author: Winston Spencer Churchill (yes, the Brit pol)
Title: "Man Overboard!" (yes, the title includes the exclamation point)
Duration: 8:51
...LJB :mrgreen:
Louise
"every little breeze..."

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 9th, 2019, 10:17 am

maxgal wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 9:16 am
Rapunzelina wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 12:16 am
maxgal wrote:
August 3rd, 2019, 8:45 pm
...so I think a good place to split "Lot No. 249" would be at the end of the paragraph on the top of the second column on p.535, ending with the words "...why I should steer clear of him in the future."
This is just about at the halfway point, and is at a break of time in the story.
https://archive.org/details/1892lotno249doyleharpersmagsept/page/n9
WDYT?
Thank you...LJB
Ha! You're right! I'd say the author intented it to be a two-part story like that! :D
Will do...LJB :mrgreen:
Quick follow-up Q:
Do I say "Part One [or Two] of 'Lot No. 249'..."?
I know this is a pretty basic Q; it's just that I try to make sure(ish) of everything(ish) because I hate to redo stuff :roll: )
...LJB
Louise
"every little breeze..."

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 9th, 2019, 10:34 am

maxgal wrote:
August 9th, 2019, 10:17 am
maxgal wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 9:16 am
Rapunzelina wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 12:16 am


Ha! You're right! I'd say the author intented it to be a two-part story like that! :D
Will do...LJB :mrgreen:
Quick follow-up Q:
Do I say "Part One [or Two] of 'Lot No. 249'..."?
I know this is a pretty basic Q; it's just that I try to make sure(ish) of everything(ish) because I hate to redo stuff :roll: )
...LJB
O, and another Q: :D
We all know the author as "[Sir] Arthur Conan Doyle," but in the magazine where this story appeared, both in the table of contents and at the beginning of the story itself, the author is "A. Conan Doyle."
So I plan to say "A. Conan Doyle."
OK...?
Louise
"every little breeze..."

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 9th, 2019, 10:52 am

maxgal wrote:
August 9th, 2019, 10:34 am
maxgal wrote:
August 9th, 2019, 10:17 am
maxgal wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 9:16 am


Will do...LJB :mrgreen:
Quick follow-up Q:
Do I say "Part One [or Two] of 'Lot No. 249'..."?
I know this is a pretty basic Q; it's just that I try to make sure(ish) of everything(ish) because I hate to redo stuff :roll: )
...LJB
O, and another Q: :D
We all know the author as "[Sir] Arthur Conan Doyle," but in the magazine where this story appeared, both in the table of contents and at the beginning of the story itself, the author is "A. Conan Doyle."
So I plan to say "A. Conan Doyle."
OK...?
!!!!!
Another Q! :lol:
Re. p.529, first column, the paragraph that starts with "Not. I...." ...
It says "Here I've been sitting gossiping like a -------- old woman when I ought to have been safely tucked up."
I suppose the blanked-out word is "damned" or something similar.
But there is no first or last letter for it.
It sounds weird to say "blank."
Should I say "damned"?
Louise
"every little breeze..."

Rapunzelina
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 7802
Joined: November 15th, 2011, 3:47 am

Post by Rapunzelina » August 9th, 2019, 12:23 pm

Quick follow-up Q:
Do I say "Part One [or Two] of 'Lot No. 249'..."?
I know this is a pretty basic Q; it's just that I try to make sure(ish) of everything(ish) because I hate to redo stuff :roll: )
...LJB
Whatever works, goes! I like your suggestion! :D
O, and another Q: :D
We all know the author as "[Sir] Arthur Conan Doyle," but in the magazine where this story appeared, both in the table of contents and at the beginning of the story itself, the author is "A. Conan Doyle."
So I plan to say "A. Conan Doyle."
OK...?
Yes, that's fine! :thumbs:
!!!!!
Another Q! :lol:
Re. p.529, first column, the paragraph that starts with "Not. I...." ...
It says "Here I've been sitting gossiping like a -------- old woman when I ought to have been safely tucked up."
I suppose the blanked-out word is "damned" or something similar.
But there is no first or last letter for it.
It sounds weird to say "blank."
Should I say "damned"?
I'd say not to use "damned" even though it's a good guess. You can use a meaningful pause or something, instead of "blank". I hope it works well!

Did I get all the questions? :mrgreen:

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 9th, 2019, 12:32 pm

Rapunzelina wrote:
August 9th, 2019, 12:23 pm
Quick follow-up Q:
Do I say "Part One [or Two] of 'Lot No. 249'..."?
I know this is a pretty basic Q; it's just that I try to make sure(ish) of everything(ish) because I hate to redo stuff :roll: )
...LJB
Whatever works, goes! I like your suggestion! :D
O, and another Q: :D
We all know the author as "[Sir] Arthur Conan Doyle," but in the magazine where this story appeared, both in the table of contents and at the beginning of the story itself, the author is "A. Conan Doyle."
So I plan to say "A. Conan Doyle."
OK...?
Yes, that's fine! :thumbs:
!!!!!
Another Q! :lol:
Re. p.529, first column, the paragraph that starts with "Not. I...." ...
It says "Here I've been sitting gossiping like a -------- old woman when I ought to have been safely tucked up."
I suppose the blanked-out word is "damned" or something similar.
But there is no first or last letter for it.
It sounds weird to say "blank."
Should I say "damned"?
I'd say not to use "damned" even though it's a good guess. You can use a meaningful pause or something, instead of "blank". I hope it works well!

Did I get all the questions? :mrgreen:
So far! :lol:
I can sort of stop-short / pause / continue with the sentence, to avoid saying "blank."
Besides, later in the text is the word "damnable," so who knows what horrible profanity not-yet-Sir Arthur might have meant. :shock: :shock: :shock:
Louise
"every little breeze..."

Rapunzelina
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 7802
Joined: November 15th, 2011, 3:47 am

Post by Rapunzelina » August 9th, 2019, 2:39 pm

maxgal wrote:
August 9th, 2019, 12:32 pm


So far! :lol:
I can sort of stop-short / pause / continue with the sentence, to avoid saying "blank."
Besides, later in the text is the word "damnable," so who knows what horrible profanity not-yet-Sir Arthur might have meant. :shock: :shock: :shock:
Oh, another idea I've heard people do is use some kind of discreet cough.

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 9th, 2019, 4:11 pm

Rapunzelina wrote:
August 9th, 2019, 2:39 pm
maxgal wrote:
August 9th, 2019, 12:32 pm


So far! :lol:
I can sort of stop-short / pause / continue with the sentence, to avoid saying "blank."
Besides, later in the text is the word "damnable," so who knows what horrible profanity not-yet-Sir Arthur might have meant. :shock: :shock: :shock:
Oh, another idea I've heard people do is use some kind of discreet cough.
Ah. I guess I'll know what I did when I've done it. :D

O BTW...

A few notes on pronunciations for Part One:

1 - On p.526, column 1, line 5, is the plural word "withes," which means "flexible twigs." It can be pronounced either "WITH" (rhymes with "with"(!)) or "WYTHE" (rhymes with "writhe"). I will pronounce it "WYTHE," because the phrase is "knitted together with withes and strands of ivy," and it just would be too weird to say "with withs." :roll: Besides, I think it sounds better to repeat the "y" sound right after this, in "ivy."

2(a) - On p.528, column 1, in the paragraph beginning "Well, I come from Applesford," the female name "Eveline" appears twice. I have found about 50 ways to pronounce this name, and have settled on "EEV-LINE" (rhymes with "leave-mine"). The reasons: (a) Brits pronounce the name "Evelyn" as "EEV-lin" instead of "EV-lin"; (b) Brits pronounce names like "Caroline" as ending in "LINE" (rhymes with "wine") instead of "LIN" (rhymes with "win"); and (c) later, on p.535, column 2 (beginning of Part Two), in the paragraph beginning "Oh, I'll keep that," Eveline's brother refers to her as "Eva" -- which I will be pronouncing as "EE-VA."

2(b) - For similar reasons, I will pronounce "dynasty" as "DINN-ES-TEE" (p.531, column 2, midway in the paragraph beginning "I thought it could not be very long....").
I'm American, but I try to bow (or curtsy) to the Brits when pronouncing Brit names.
(But I draw the line at trying to sound "authentically" British, which I could not do to save my Yank life.)

3 - On p.533, column 2, line 5, is the non-word "dliriumtremenses." This obviously means "delirium tremens" -- apparently, the weird spelling is the author's way of putting on a "servant's accent," because this is spoken by a little old man named Tom Styles, the "little wrinkled man-servant" who takes care of all those "young gentlemen" in university. I plan to say, more or less, "delirium tremens-ez" just to keep it simple.

That's all for now! :mrgreen:
Thanks for your help...LJB
Louise
"every little breeze..."

christinabui
Posts: 15
Joined: July 22nd, 2019, 2:29 pm

Post by christinabui » August 9th, 2019, 10:27 pm

Hello!

Here's a submission of my reading of "Over an Absinthe Bottle".

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ghohor035_overanabsinthebottle_morrow_cb_128kb.mp3

Text Source: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21616/21616-h/21616-h.htm
Author: W. C. Morrow
Title: Over an Absinthe Bottle
File Duration: 24:48

Cheers,

- CB

maxgal
Posts: 241
Joined: June 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

Post by maxgal » August 11th, 2019, 11:17 am

maxgal wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 6:41 pm
Here is my first one for this collection:
https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ghohor035_manoverboard_churchill_ljb_128kb.mp3
Text: https://archive.org/details/1898manoverboardchurchhill
Author: Winston Spencer Churchill (yes, the Brit pol)
Title: "Man Overboard!" (yes, the title includes the exclamation point)
Duration: 8:51
...LJB :mrgreen:
Just checking... I don't see this in the MW yet.
Maybe it fell into my morass of stuff about "Lot No. 249" :mrgreen: -- which, BTW, I am working on like a demon. :twisted:
LN249 isn't an easy one! Lots of dialogue, lots of characters.
It's an interesting challenge, upon which I am determined to be a literary Wonder Woman... 8-)
Louise
"every little breeze..."

Honnha
Posts: 22
Joined: November 12th, 2016, 1:39 am
Location: Iowa

Post by Honnha » August 11th, 2019, 12:00 pm

Hello,

It's been a while since I've read for LibriVox, but I'm back and would like my first submission to be here.

I'd like to record "When I Was Dead" by Vincent O'Sullivan published in 1906.

The only online text version available at this time is on Project Gutenberg Australia, but given Mr. O'Sullivan died in 1940 his works are now in the public domain.
Text:http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0606241h.html

Thanks,
H. Newberry
"Give me your scars, your blemishes, your beauty marks and bruises.
I am allergic to perfection and
plastic makes me leery."

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