COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 063 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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soupy
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Post by soupy » January 29th, 2019, 5:31 am

Thanks for A Familiar Preface by Conrad, Peter :D

Well read and PLOK :thumbs:

Craig
You perceive the force of a word. He who wants to persuade should put his trust not in the right argument, but in the right word. The power of sound has always been greater than the power of sense. I don't say this by way of disparagement. It is better for mankind to be impressionable than reflective. Nothing humanely great—great, I mean, as affecting a whole mass of lives—has come from reflection. On the other hand, you cannot fail to see the power of mere words; such words as Glory, for instance, or Pity.

soupy
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Post by soupy » January 29th, 2019, 6:01 am

Thanks for the lesson about barbed wire Sue. I saw many movies when I was young showing cattle and people getting hurt by barbed wire. Maybe it was all fake news.

Your reading is PLOK :thumbs:

Craig

Availle
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Post by Availle » February 6th, 2019, 7:44 am

I'm very sorry, it seems that after my announcement, the collection came to a grinding halt... That was not my intention at all. :oops: I am glad that there are a few more slots though :wink:

And here is finally my oevre entitled "Audience", which I find rather... useful to know about.
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf063_audience_britannica_ava_128kb.mp3

It's only 2:33 long, and from the Encyclopedia Britannica here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34312

In my defense for the shortness of the piece (other than that I was really, really busy), I thought of recording the entry for Austria or Japan, but both of them would probably warrant their own solo, so detailed are they. :shock:
Cheers,
Ava.

--
AvailleAudio.com

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » February 6th, 2019, 8:04 am

Thank you, Availle! :)

soupy
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Post by soupy » February 6th, 2019, 1:11 pm

Audience is PLOK

Craig

Timothy Ferguson
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Post by Timothy Ferguson » February 9th, 2019, 10:21 pm

Author: Eye Witness
Title: "A true and perfect account of the miraculous sea-monster, or, Wonderful fish lately taken in Ireland bigger than ox, yet without legs, bones, fins, or scales, with two heads, and ten horns of 10 or 11 foot long, on eight of which horns there grew knobs about the bigness of a cloak-button, in shape like crowns or coronets, to the number of 100 on each horn, which were all to open, and had rows of teeth within them ... : together with the manner how it first appeared and was taken at a place called Dingel Ichough"
Source: https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A63422.0001.001/1:3?rgn=div1;view=toc
Upload: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf063_atrueandperfect_Eye-witness_tf_128kb.mp3
Length: 9:13
My occasional blog is Games from Folktales

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » February 10th, 2019, 6:32 am

Hi Timothy, Thanks for this! :) Delightful! Sounds like it was an octopus?

Non bonum est Ludere cum Sanctis, we dare not prophain a Text for a Jest, nor play the fool with Thunderbolts, and hope none will be so impertinently vain, as to place every strange production in Nature to be ac∣count of Prodigies, since, if we consider how large a share the Sea makes of this inferiour Globe, and that Nature is ever active and wonderfully fruitful, we may not irrationally conclude, or at least suspect the Ocean to be inhabited with as many several species of Creatures, as the Earth; and that the vast wilderness of Waters contains as many Monsters, and altogether as strange ones, as any in the Desarts of Afrique.

Timothy Ferguson
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Post by Timothy Ferguson » February 10th, 2019, 7:00 am

Sue Anderson wrote:
February 10th, 2019, 6:32 am
Hi Timothy, Thanks for this! :) Delightful! Sounds like it was octopus?

Non bonum est Ludere cum Sanctis, we dare not prophain a Text for a Jest, nor play the fool with Thunderbolts, and hope none will be so impertinently vain, as to place every strange production in Nature to be ac∣count of Prodigies, since, if we consider how large a share the Sea makes of this inferiour Globe, and that Nature is ever active and wonderfully fruitful, we may not irrationally conclude, or at least suspect the Ocean to be inhabited with as many several species of Creatures, as the Earth; and that the vast wilderness of Waters contains as many Monsters, and altogether as strange ones, as any in the Desarts of Afrique.


I'm glad you liked it. I write roleplaying games, and a monster with two heads and eight hundred mouths was too good to pass up. 8)

I presume it was a squid, but I'm not sure what type. I have had a bit of a rummage because I used to be a marine science librarian for a little while. Sadly I can't find the picture that was in the original pamphlet. The transcript just says "[illustration]". I may contact the home library and ask for a photo.

The distinctive bits are they say its body was shaped like a wedge, and that it had ten "horns", eight shorter and two longer, and its suckers had teeth in them, which octopuses don't. Well, true octopuses don't. The vampire octopus / vampire squid does, because it's a sort of unique thing that's just pretending to be an octopus, when it's not pretending to be a psychedelic pineapple. (Is it odd that I have a favourite squid?)

Squids do have sucker teeth , but I'd warn you there's something slightly nightmarish about sucker teeth, so don't google pictures unless you'd like to see lots of rows of tiny shark-like mouths. 8)

Added later: The picture is in here. https://books.google.com.au/books/about/A_true_and_perfect_account_of_the_miracu.html?id=_XB7ReKMRX8C&redir_esc=y
My occasional blog is Games from Folktales


Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » February 10th, 2019, 7:46 am

Thanks for the pic, Timothy! Yes, it does look like a squid. :? Oddly enough, the detail of the description that attracted my first attention was the use of a cloak button for size comparison: "a Wonderful fish lately taken in Ireland bigger than ox, yet without legs, bones, fins, or scales, with two heads, and ten horns of 10 or 11 foot long, on eight of which horns there grew knobs about the bigness of a cloak-button..." Today (in the U.S.) we'd probably use a monetary comparison ("about the size of a quarter"). I began wondering what size a 17th century cloak button was...

christopherhoving
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Post by christopherhoving » February 24th, 2019, 7:56 pm

Recollections of Audubon Park
by George Bird Grinnell
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf063_recollectionsaudubon_grinnell_clh_128kb.mp3
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/15938883#page/473/mode/thumb
18:18
in the LibriVox catalog as Christopher Hoving

Just starting out. Hope I got this right.

George Bird Grinnell is a noteworthy early conservationist and one of the founding members of The Audubon Society and the Boone and Crockett Club. This short autobiographical piece (published in The Auk in 1920) covers his memories of John James Audubon's widow and son, who were neighbors, teachers, and mentors. The descriptions of early New York City (out beyond where Broadway turned into a dirt road) would be of interest to those familiar with that city.
Sausage puns are the wurst.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » February 25th, 2019, 7:40 am

christopherhoving wrote:
February 24th, 2019, 7:56 pm
Recollections of Audubon Park
by George Bird Grinnell
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf063_recollectionsaudubon_grinnell_clh_128kb.mp3
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/15938883#page/473/mode/thumb
18:18
in the LibriVox catalog as Christopher Hoving

Just starting out. Hope I got this right.

George Bird Grinnell is a noteworthy early conservationist and one of the founding members of The Audubon Society and the Boone and Crockett Club. This short autobiographical piece (published in The Auk in 1920) covers his memories of John James Audubon's widow and son, who were neighbors, teachers, and mentors. The descriptions of early New York City (out beyond where Broadway turned into a dirt road) would be of interest to those familiar with that city.
Hi Christopher, Welcome to LibriVox! :) Thank you for choosing to contribute to the Nonfiction Collection! I'm enjoying listening to your selection as I enter the data for your recording in the computer. Grinnell has many fascinating recollections--the character of Mrs. Audubon, passenger pigeons, New York...

The specs on your recording are fine, and you read at a good pace, easy to follow! :) Here at the Nonfiction Collection, we have a dedicated proof listener (DPL), Craig (Soupy), who will proof listen your recording, and he is the next person you'll hear from here on the thread.

Regards,

Sue (Book Coordinator)

soupy
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Post by soupy » February 25th, 2019, 12:43 pm

Thanks Christopher :D

Well read. One error noted.

14:55 there were many small shore birds on the Dyckman marshes, which the little boys hunted faithfully – you read birds for boys

Craig

christopherhoving
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Post by christopherhoving » February 28th, 2019, 7:19 pm

Craig,

Thanks. Try this.

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf063_recollectionsaudubon_grinnell_clh_128kb.mp3

Tone changed a bit, so you can tell it is an edit. I am still learning the ropes, and not entirely sure on editing. Is it too obvious?

Chris
Sausage puns are the wurst.

soupy
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Post by soupy » March 1st, 2019, 11:18 am

Your correction and tome sounded good to me.

PLOK

Craig

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