COMPLETECoffee Break Collection 012-The Performing Arts-mary

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Post Reply
LibriFoxy
Posts: 774
Joined: July 28th, 2009, 6:18 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by LibriFoxy » October 10th, 2015, 10:54 am

Coffee Break Collection 012 - The Performing Arts by Various.


This project is now complete and can be found in our catalog here: http://librivox.org/coffeebreak-collection-012-performing-arts/


This is the 12th collection of our "coffee break" series, involving public domain works that are between 3 and 15 minutes in length. These are great for study breaks, commutes, workouts, or any time you'd like to hear a whole story and only have a few minutes to devote to listening. The theme for this collection is "The Performing Arts", with works about theatre, music, dance, and film! (Summary by Rosie)
  1. How to submit to this collection:

    Please select and record any very short piece about music, theatre, dance, or film. (Note: If we have trouble finding PD works about film, I'll edit accordingly, but I'd like to try!) Both fiction and nonfiction are welcome, the works should be about the performing arts, rather than plays or songs themselves.. Though everyone reads at different speeds, you'll likely need to look for pieces with fewer than 2500 words to be within the 15 minute maximum. (Remember, if you record something and it ends up being longer, there are other collections to submit to!) You do not sign up or post in the thread before recording; as long as the work is clearly in the public domain, just go ahead and submit your section according to the instructions below.

    Please try to read a complete piece. Short stories, essays, self-contained chapters (like in a travel or humor book), and letters are all great. If you wish to read an excerpt from a larger piece, it should be okay if it truly stands on its own. Just post here in the thread with your idea if you aren't sure!

    For coffee break collections, we ask that each reader submit no more than three sections.

    If you have no idea where to begin, search Gutenberg for a variety of keywords related to this topic, and see what comes up! I suggest trying music, musicians, concerts, performers, acting, theatre, performing arts, film, movies, motion pictures, composers, theatrical. If you find a good collection of shorter works that would go well here, post your findings in the thread!

    Ideas thus far: A collection of essays about musicians by brilliant composer Saint-Saëns!

    The Love Affairs Of Great Musicians

    The Art Of Stage Dancing


    Click "Post reply" at the top left of the screen and tell us which story you are submitting to the collection. Please include all this information:

    • link to the text source
    • author name
    • title of the story
    • title of the collection or anthology, if it's from a greater work
    • duration (runtime) of the file
    • if this is your first recording: how you would like to be listed in the LibriVox catalogue. We can also link to a personal web site/blog.
  2. New to recording? Please read our Newbie Guide to Recording!
  3. If this is your first recording, please let me know under which name or pseudonym you'd like to appear in the LibriVox catalogue. We can also link to a personal website/blog.

    DPL: kathrinee

    Please don't download or listen to files belonging to projects in process (unless you are the BC or PL). Our servers are not set up to handle the greater volume of traffic. Please wait until the project has been completed. Thanks!

    [mw]10331[/mw]

    ============================================

    Genres for the project: General Fiction; Plays

    Keywords that describe the book: drama, music, film, theatre, performance, orchestra, performing arts, acting, dance, stage, musicians, composiers

    ============================================
  4. BEFORE recording: Please check the Recording Notes: http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=6427#6430

    Set your recording software to:
    Channels: 1 (Mono)
    Bit Rate: 128 kbps
    Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz
  5. DURING recording:
    No more than 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning of the recording!
    Make sure you add this to the beginning of your recording:

    START of recording (Intro)
    • "[Title] by [author]. This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox DOT org"
    • If you wish, say: "Recording by [your name], [city, your blog, podcast, web address]"
    • Say:
      "[Title] ([from anthology], if applicable)"


    END of recording
    • At the end of the section, say:
      "End of [Title] by [Author]"
    • If you wish, say:
      "Recording by [your name], [city, your blog, podcast, web address]"

    There should be 5 seconds silence at the end of the recording, or 10 seconds for files longer than 30 minutes.

    Please remember to check this thread frequently for updates!
  6. AFTER recording
    Need noise-cleaning?
    Listen to your file through headphones. If you can hear some constant background noise (hiss/buzz), you may want to clean it up a bit. The new (free) version 1.3.3. of Audacity has much improved noise-cleaning. See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide.
    Save files as
    128 kbps MP3
    coffeebreak012_shorttitle_authorlastname_128kb.mp3 (all lower-case) where ## is the section number (e.g. coffeebreak012_modestproposal_swift_128kb.mp3)
  7. Transfer of files (completed recordings) Please always post in this forum thread when you've sent a file. Also, post the length of the recording (file duration: mm:ss) together with the link.
    • Upload your file with the LibriVox Uploader: https://librivox.org/login/uploader
      Image
      (If you have trouble reading the image above, please message an admin)
    • You'll need to select the MC, which for this project is: maryannspiegel
    • When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - please post it in this thread.
    • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page.
  8. Any questions?
    Please post below
Last edited by LibriFoxy on January 26th, 2016, 7:12 pm, edited 8 times in total.
Rosie in Boston

Coffee Break Collection 12 is up and looking for readers! Theme: The Performing Arts!

MaryAnnSpiegel
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16011
Joined: February 23rd, 2009, 4:37 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Post by MaryAnnSpiegel » October 12th, 2015, 8:01 am

Rosie,
I would be happy to MC this for you.
MaryAnn

LibriFoxy
Posts: 774
Joined: July 28th, 2009, 6:18 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by LibriFoxy » October 12th, 2015, 6:31 pm

Thank you so much, MaryAnn!

Anyone up for a DPL project? No commitments greater than 15 minutes! :D
Rosie in Boston

Coffee Break Collection 12 is up and looking for readers! Theme: The Performing Arts!

SonOfTheExiles
Posts: 1665
Joined: December 20th, 2013, 1:14 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Post by SonOfTheExiles » October 16th, 2015, 3:04 pm

I did promise it would be obscure, didn't I? :D

"Delkiow Sevi" ("Strawberry Leaves"), A Traditional Song of Flirtatious Banter in the Cornish Language - cited in William Pryce’s 1790 Archaeologia Cornu-Britannica
https://archive.org/stream/archaeologiacor02prycgoog#page/n254/mode/1up
4:41
https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/coffeebreak012_delkiowsevi_pryce_128kb.mp3

Sharp eyes will notice that the second line refrain in the final verse is written as "pedn du" ("dark head") rather than as "bedgeth gwin" ("white face") like all the other verses. It seems there were two trains of thought as to what constituted the ideal of feminine beauty in Old Cornwall, as there were two versions of the song with these two different refrains. Mr Pryce appears to have forgotten which one he was recording, since the final verse's refrain is different. In singing the Cornish words, I've corrected the final verse's refrain to make things consistent.

By the way, I'm given to understand that, in the old days, women apparently used strawberry leaves as a poultice, or something or other, to bleach the skin, hence the other refrain of the song.


Cheers,
Son of the Exiles
"Sorry, my tongue got in the way of my eye-tooth, and I couldn't see what I was saying..."
Son of the Exiles YouTube Channel
Dramatic Selections from Henry Lawson's Short Stories
(Poetry) Wine and Roses, by Victor J. Daley

LibriFoxy
Posts: 774
Joined: July 28th, 2009, 6:18 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by LibriFoxy » October 16th, 2015, 9:41 pm

Thanks for the first section, SOTE! We don't have a DPL yet, but hopefully one will join on soon. This section is great, though I'll be encouraging contributers to submit works about the performing arts, rather than songs or plays themselves (I just edited the first post to reflect that.) But this looks like a great 17th century love song, and thanks for the submission!! MW updated.
Rosie in Boston

Coffee Break Collection 12 is up and looking for readers! Theme: The Performing Arts!

adonis
Posts: 1260
Joined: August 27th, 2015, 8:33 am

Post by adonis » October 17th, 2015, 1:25 am

I've tried to top and tail this according to your instructions - it's a rather wonderful piece on reading aloud from Jane Austen but I'm not quite sure if this is how you would describe it. Glad to make any changes.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/141

https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/coffeebreak012_readingshakespeare_austen_%60128kb.mp3

Length: 6:58

Tony Addison

LibriFoxy
Posts: 774
Joined: July 28th, 2009, 6:18 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by LibriFoxy » October 17th, 2015, 10:03 am

Tony, thanks so much for your reading! Great section from Mansfield Park. Unfortunately, the coffee break collections are for works that stand on their own. Letters, sections from anthologies, short stories, etc. Occasionally, a whole section or chapter from a novel is appropriate but it's important that it is the whole chapter, rather than starting from the middle.

If you're interested in topics about Shakespeare, I found this great collection on Shakespearean Playhouses by Joseph Quincy Adams. Perhaps give one of these sections a go!

MaryAnn, would you mind adding William Pryce to the author list so I can list him as the editor of section 1? Thanks!!
Rosie in Boston

Coffee Break Collection 12 is up and looking for readers! Theme: The Performing Arts!

MaryAnnSpiegel
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16011
Joined: February 23rd, 2009, 4:37 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Post by MaryAnnSpiegel » October 17th, 2015, 10:34 am

Rosie,
You mean this William Pryce? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Pryce
MaryAnn

LibriFoxy
Posts: 774
Joined: July 28th, 2009, 6:18 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by LibriFoxy » October 17th, 2015, 10:37 am

That looks to be the man from the time period and Cornish language, but he wasn't an option in the author database when I edited the metadata. Maybe he just hasn't been added yet?
Rosie in Boston

Coffee Break Collection 12 is up and looking for readers! Theme: The Performing Arts!

MaryAnnSpiegel
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16011
Joined: February 23rd, 2009, 4:37 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Post by MaryAnnSpiegel » October 17th, 2015, 12:30 pm

I will add him. We put information in on birth and death dates, and the Wikipedia entry if possible, so just wanted to be sure I was using the right biographical data.

MaryAnn

SonOfTheExiles
Posts: 1665
Joined: December 20th, 2013, 1:14 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Post by SonOfTheExiles » October 19th, 2015, 12:53 pm

Could it be that the thought of having to PL the Cornish language as a starter is causing potential DPLs to avoid us like a pile of radium? :shock:

Come. Join us. Don't be afraid. :D

Actually, responsibility for the correct delivery of the language there is mine.

Here, I'll tell you a fun fact about Cornish. There is actually no simple word in the language for 'Yes' or 'No'. If asked a question in Cornish, the only way to answer is to reflect back the verb the questioner used, either alone for an affirmative answer or with the verbal negating particle attached. In English, this would be like answering the question "Do you speak Cornish?" by either saying "I speak" or "I speak not".

How did my ancestors develop such a crazy system? Well, I blame the Cornish granite, which apparently has the highest background radioactivity count of any in the world. Probably accounts for me, too. :lol:


Son of the Exiles
"Sorry, my tongue got in the way of my eye-tooth, and I couldn't see what I was saying..."
Son of the Exiles YouTube Channel
Dramatic Selections from Henry Lawson's Short Stories
(Poetry) Wine and Roses, by Victor J. Daley

DarkGoddess
Posts: 5
Joined: October 11th, 2015, 11:52 am

Post by DarkGoddess » October 19th, 2015, 1:03 pm

I would love to read "A Bit of Ancient History" in The Art of Stage Dancing (pg 19) by Ned Wayburn. Once, I get the okay from you, I'll begin right way!!!

(author DarkGoddess)

LibriFoxy
Posts: 774
Joined: July 28th, 2009, 6:18 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by LibriFoxy » October 19th, 2015, 7:14 pm

DarkGoddess, that sounds like a great section! Read away!

SOTE, hopefully someone will appreciate the minutae of the Cornish ways and join in! I'm sure it'll happen :)

I'm currently working on a fabulous insight to the "stage door" - So much happens between the public and backstage!
Rosie in Boston

Coffee Break Collection 12 is up and looking for readers! Theme: The Performing Arts!

DarkGoddess
Posts: 5
Joined: October 11th, 2015, 11:52 am

Post by DarkGoddess » October 30th, 2015, 1:02 pm

sorry I have not turned in my recording yet - been super busy and without a kitchen sink for the last week . . . will hand in soon!!!

Veggrower
Posts: 547
Joined: February 25th, 2010, 9:12 am
Location: Devon, England

Post by Veggrower » November 11th, 2015, 7:59 am

Hi - here are a couple of submissions which I hope are suitable. They're both taken from the same anthology, "How to Write a Play", which is a collection of letters written by various authors.

Text source: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/18230

MP3: https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/coffeebreak012_howtowriteaplay_legouve_128kb.mp3 Length 3:55

MP3: https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/coffeebreak012_howtowriteaplay_dumas_128kb.mp3 Length 6:36

Dates are: Ernest Legouve (1807-1903), Alexandre Dumas fils (1824-1895)

The authors of the anthology are William Gillette (1853-1937), and Dudley H Miles (1881-1954)

Editor of anthology James Brander Matthews (1852-1929)

Thanks,

Garth

Post Reply