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safasofia
Posts: 11
Joined: January 4th, 2019, 2:32 pm

Post by safasofia » January 5th, 2019, 2:51 am

Hi there,

I'm an American living in Berlin, Germany and I'm excited to start volunteering for Librivox. I love audiobooks and reading aloud to people, so this is a match made in heaven (I hope!).

I'm planning on going through all the tutorial videos from Phil as well as recording my 1-minute test before I dive in to signing up for group work.

Fun fact about my audiobook enthusiasm: between June 2017 and end of December 2018, I listened to over 350 audiobooks! They're a great companion on commutes and during slow days.

I've also learned my biggest pet peeve is when the sound is not equalized, and when the noise suddenly gets very loud (please don't actually yell in our ears! Lower the volume on that part of the recording to avoid damage to our poor ears when we wear earbuds).

Take care and I look forward to working with you!

moniaqua
Posts: 1236
Joined: April 11th, 2013, 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in the south

Post by moniaqua » January 5th, 2019, 3:03 am

Welcome at LibriVox :)
safasofia wrote:
January 5th, 2019, 2:51 am
I've also learned my biggest pet peeve is when the sound is not equalized, and when the noise suddenly gets very loud (please don't actually yell in our ears! Lower the volume on that part of the recording to avoid damage to our poor ears when we wear earbuds).
You do not mean equalized but leveled? Too high a dynamic range? And you do not mean noise but some yelling or so? As noise in context of recording is all the stuff which does not belong to your voice and reading, i.e. humming, church bells in the background and so on. I usually step back from the mic when I yell; that way the volume is lowered automatically :)

I suppose our DPLs would tell us if it really hurts in the ears, so I am wondering a little bit what recordings you mean?

safasofia
Posts: 11
Joined: January 4th, 2019, 2:32 pm

Post by safasofia » January 5th, 2019, 7:21 am

Hi Monika,

Thanks for the welcome! I'm not very good with technical terminology so maybe that other term is the right one. I mean when the author reads as a fairly consistent volume for hours and then they suddenly yell (for example if their character is angry) and it is very loud. I think there are various strategies to tackle that. One as you mentioned for the voice artist to stand back from the mic, but another method I've used in video editing is for the editor to open up the audio and at the loudest parts, to lower the volume to make those spikes equal to the rest of the audio. It still sounds like yelling, but just not as painful for earbud users! I don't know which way produces the best quality sound, so I hope to learn more!

safasofia
Posts: 11
Joined: January 4th, 2019, 2:32 pm

Post by safasofia » January 5th, 2019, 8:12 am

Oh how perfect, this topic is covered in the first video from Phil I clicked on! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-fKYYj6HMZU He calls it "compressing".

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