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Yan
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Joined: March 22nd, 2006, 8:29 am

Post by Yan » March 22nd, 2006, 8:42 am

Hi, my name is Yangwon Seo. Just call me Yan.
I'm really happy to listen lot of wonderful books here.
Nice to meet you guys. :lol:

kri
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Post by kri » March 22nd, 2006, 8:46 am

Welcome to LibriVox Yan :)

I don't know if you want to record and help us out, but you can still help us by listening. Have you seen the Listeners Wanted forum? ( here: http://librivox.org/forum/viewforum.php?f=22 ) This is where we post recordings before they get put on our catalog, to make sure they don't have any errors. You should check it out! You can listen to great recordings, and help us complete our projects at the same time.

Yan
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Joined: March 22nd, 2006, 8:29 am

Post by Yan » March 22nd, 2006, 8:52 am

Of course I'd like to record books. but my english isn't that good to record yet. I hope someday to join recording. Please help me with advices and tips at that time. Thanks.

kri
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Post by kri » March 22nd, 2006, 8:59 am

Yan wrote:Of course I'd like to record books. but my english isn't that good to record yet. I hope someday to join recording. Please help me with advices and tips at that time. Thanks.
We have all sorts of non-native English speakers doing recordings. We enjoy the variety of accents as well :) As long as you can read in a way that is understandable to the listener, and your understanding of English as you read it is good enough to give the correct inflection as you read, your recording will be fine :)

thistlechick
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Post by thistlechick » March 22nd, 2006, 9:12 am

Yan, you're also welcome to read public domain works in your native language.... we have an expanding collection of works in languages other than English =)
~ Betsie
Multiple projects lead to multiple successes!

kri
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Post by kri » March 22nd, 2006, 9:17 am

thistlechick wrote:Yan, you're also welcome to read public domain works in your native language.... we have an expanding collection of works in languages other than English =)
Absolutely!

marlodianne
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Post by marlodianne » March 22nd, 2006, 9:30 am

You beat me to it Betsie, I was flexing to type, so about to say that! I don't think we'll be satisified until we get the catalogue expanded with so many languages that we have Hamlet in the original Klingon :D

Welcome Yan! You're highly encouraged to bring us something in any language you're comfortable with, but listeners are still what keeps us going, so it's great to hear from you any way we can. :)
Marlo Dianne
Writer, Artist, Wondergeek
forbiddendragon.blogspot.com

"We live as though the world was as it should be, to show it what it can be." --Angel

hugh
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Post by hugh » March 22nd, 2006, 9:51 am

welcome yan!

marlo, I think the Klingon version of Hamlet is not public domain in US (tho it's OK in the EU; and King Lear is good - go figure).

All Romulan translations of Shakespeare, however, should be ok.

;)

marlodianne
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Post by marlodianne » March 22nd, 2006, 10:03 am

Hugh, I'm shocked it's PD anywhere. They just did Hamlet in March of 1996.
Marlo Dianne
Writer, Artist, Wondergeek
forbiddendragon.blogspot.com

"We live as though the world was as it should be, to show it what it can be." --Angel

ChipDoc
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Post by ChipDoc » March 22nd, 2006, 12:38 pm

I think that what Hugh means is that LibriVox is a continuing project, and that we'll still be here and anxious to do Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (The Restored Klingon Version) when it ascends into the Public Domain in 2071.

Welcome to LibriVox, Yan - it's great to hear a fresh voice of ANY language in the mix!

taH pagh taHbe'!
-Chip
[url]http://ChipDoc.com/LibriVox/[/url]
[i]The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them.[/i]
~Mark Twain

marlodianne
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Post by marlodianne » March 22nd, 2006, 12:59 pm

ChipDoc wrote:I think that what Hugh means is that LibriVox is a continuing project, and that we'll still be here and anxious to do Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (The Restored Klingon Version) when it ascends into the Public Domain in 2071.
Actually, that was my point, we wouldn't satisfied until we ran out of natural languages and had to ascend to the constructed ones. Naturally, the geek in me thinks of Klingon as the most desirable of that group....:)

Although, I can't see it ascending to public domain in 2071. Copyright law is 75 years after the creator's death. Unless everyone involved immediately met an unforunate end. But then, I suppose it depends on how the Klingon Language Institute registered their copyright. Hmmm.
Marlo Dianne
Writer, Artist, Wondergeek
forbiddendragon.blogspot.com

"We live as though the world was as it should be, to show it what it can be." --Angel

ChipDoc
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Post by ChipDoc » March 22nd, 2006, 1:02 pm

Not to mention the fact that there are a whole lot of Klingons out there who DO immediately meet an unfortunate end. We've seen whole ships full of them disappear in an instant.

Sometimes even the same footage to represent different ships... ;)

Sorry to have hijacked your thread, Yan...
-Chip
[url]http://ChipDoc.com/LibriVox/[/url]
[i]The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them.[/i]
~Mark Twain

marlodianne
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Post by marlodianne » March 22nd, 2006, 1:08 pm

Yes, Yan, we're not ignoring you. We just love to ramble, so they're all really free range threads :)

ps. Chip, isn't that why they always say it's a good day to die?
Marlo Dianne
Writer, Artist, Wondergeek
forbiddendragon.blogspot.com

"We live as though the world was as it should be, to show it what it can be." --Angel

ChipDoc
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Post by ChipDoc » March 22nd, 2006, 1:34 pm

Weirdly, that particular phrase is from the traditions of the Oglala Sioux. A warrior named Low Dog uttered it in perhaps the most famous use of the phrase when he described a Sioux victory over the US Army on a small hill at a bend of the Little Big Horn river:

I called to my men: “This is a good day to die: follow me.”...As we rushed upon them the [soldiers] dismounted to fire, but they did very poor shooting. They held their horse's reins on one arm while they were shooting, but their horses were so frightened that they pulled the men all around and a great many of their shots went up into the air and did us no harm.

Even more weirdly, less than a day's travel by horse from that place stands a Minuteman silo. In the space of a single human lifespan, the technology of war went from stone knives to Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles.

I really watch WAY too much PBS, don't I...?
http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/program/episodes/six/goodday.htm
-Chip
[url]http://ChipDoc.com/LibriVox/[/url]
[i]The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them.[/i]
~Mark Twain

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