A Big Szia for all from Hungary

Get to know your fellow readers and tell us a little about yourself
Post Reply
pipacsos
Posts: 33
Joined: March 3rd, 2006, 4:57 pm

Post by pipacsos » March 3rd, 2006, 7:04 pm

Hello LibriVox voices,

I'm Mariann from Hungary.

I have been searching the internet high and low for hours to find some radio drama or any audio book which has the power to send me to sweet dreams and gee, I have found LibriVox!!! Guys, this project is just amazing!!

I'd love to contribute, definitely, yes!! I have never ever done audiobooks on my own before, I am only a fan of listening them. Nothing would be more of a challenge for me than reading a Dickinson poem with my Hungarian accent and keep you away from smiling ;) But do you think anyone would listen to an audiobook in English AND with Hungarian mixed with German accent?? Hmmm...


Oh, true, I've almost forgotten... A little bit of myself...I finished my studies in North American Literature and Culture and Theater Studies (my specialization was Contemporary Canadian Theater and Drama, all my respect to Tomson Highway and Paul Thompson :) ) some years ago and since then I have been learning Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese and Hebrew in Germany, worked for the digitization center of the local university where we digitized scientific journals from the 19th century. These months when I don't happen to sleep I work with graphics and photography.

I haven't really read through everything yet and of course I have tons of questions about the public domain and technical stuff as well, cos at some points it isn't really clear what counts as a ready-to-go short-story/poem/novel in this project...like Hungarian literature translated into English would go into which category? The translator has his or her copyrights as well, is it right? And IF I happen to find some Hungarian literature in English, which dates back to 1923 or earlier, which date is to check out? The date of the first publishing in the USA in English or of the work first published in Hungarian? Uff, why is the world so complicated? And actually, what about English/ American/Canadian works translated INTO Hungarian? Could I read anything like that as well? And then in this latter case, which date counts concerning the copyright? And most importantly, what chances do you think it has that I could read any Hungarian work in Hungarian? I have checked out the Gutenberg Project and the ones I found aren't really the highlights of Hungarian Literature and besides they would sound much better with a male voice, which I don't really have. Can I choose anything that is written by a man? I mean when the narrator IS actually a man? It would sound a bit odd, wouldn't it?

OK, I think I felt a little bit too baroque for a start.
Would be great to hear from you soon.
?dv,
Mariann
Mariann

kayray
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 11859
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 9:10 am
Location: Union City, California
Contact:

Post by kayray » March 3rd, 2006, 7:17 pm

pipacsos wrote: I'd love to contribute, definitely, yes!! I have never ever done audiobooks on my own before, I am only a fan of listening them. Nothing would be more of a challenge for me than reading a Dickinson poem with my Hungarian accent and keep you away from smiling ;) But do you think anyone would listen to an audiobook in English AND with Hungarian mixed with German accent?? Hmmm...
Welcome to librivox, Mariann! Yes, yes, yes, we will _love_ to hear your Hungarian mixed with German accent :) It will make us smile with delight! Sign up for anything you like :)
pipacsos wrote: I haven't really read through everything yet and of course I have tons of questions about the public domain and technical stuff as well, cos at some points it isn't really clear what counts as a ready-to-go short-story/poem/novel in this project...like Hungarian literature translated into English would go into which category? The translator has his or her copyrights as well, is it right? And IF I happen to find some Hungarian literature in English, which dates back to 1923 or earlier, which date is to check out? The date of the first publishing in the USA in English or of the work first published in Hungarian? Uff, why is the world so complicated? And actually, what about English/ American/Canadian works translated INTO Hungarian? Could I read anything like that as well? And then in this latter case, which date counts concerning the copyright? And most importantly, what chances do you think it has that I could read any Hungarian work in Hungarian? I have checked out the Gutenberg Project and the ones I found aren't really the highlights of Hungarian Literature and besides they would sound much better with a male voice, which I don't really have.
Yes... the copyright question is a complicated one. Since our servers are in the US, it's US copyright we have to think about. So, if the original work _and_ the translation are copyrighted before 1923 in the US, it's ok. For more complex situations, check with thistlechick (Betsie), our resident copyright expert :)
pipacsos wrote:Can I choose anything that is written by a man? I mean when the narrator IS actually a man? It would sound a bit odd, wouldn't it?
Yup! We have men reading women's "voices" and women reading men's in nearly every book. Read what you please :) (Except plays -- we try to cast those to appropriate genders!)

Here's a good page to help you get started reading:
http://librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/NewbieGuideToRecording

Make yourself at home and feel free to ask any questions!
Kara
http://kayray.org/
--------
"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

kri
Posts: 5354
Joined: January 3rd, 2006, 8:34 pm
Location: Keene NH
Contact:

Post by kri » March 3rd, 2006, 7:22 pm

Your best first start to information about copyright here at Librivox is this wiki page: http://librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/CopyrightAndPublicDomain

In fact, you should check out the whole wiki. It's a great source for answers, and we're trying to regularly add more information for new volunteers :)

http://librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/LibriVoxWiki

You can read anything you like (in the public domain) regardless of the voice of the narrator. I'm currently reading Heart of Darkness, and the narrator AND main character is a man. Of course I'm female, but that hasn't stopped me! :)

Welcome, welcome, welcome :)

Oh yes, and as Kara already stated, we love accents! Check out Rainer's reading of The Awful German language by Mark Twain ( http://librivox.org/the-awful-german-language-by-mark-twain/ )

vee
Posts: 585
Joined: October 10th, 2005, 7:35 pm
Location: Columbia, MD
Contact:

Post by vee » March 3rd, 2006, 8:12 pm

Welcome welcome!

Kara and kri have given you all the basic info to get started. If you have any other questions let us know.

Good to have you aboard!

Chris
Chris Vee
"You never truly understand something until you can explain it to your grandmother." - Albert Einstein

ChipDoc
Posts: 1236
Joined: January 4th, 2006, 3:11 am
Location: Tampa, FL
Contact:

Post by ChipDoc » March 3rd, 2006, 8:42 pm

Welcome to LibriVox, pipacsos!

I see that folks have already given you all of the best advice, so let me recommend something to begin with. Come over to the Readers Wanted - Short Works and claim one of Aesop's Fables to read! They're nice and short (often only a minute long even with the intro and the outro) and they're a great way to get used to reading for LibriVox. I've just opened Volume 8, so there are LOTS of great ones to choose from

You should also think about reading something in Hungarian! Though most of LibriVox is in English, we've got German, Finnish, French, Italian, and Spanish projects either ongoing or completed, and we're starting a Polish project too. Something Hungarian read in it's native language would be welcomed!

It's great having you here, pipacsos - it's always great to hear a fresh voice in the mix!
-Chip
[url]http://ChipDoc.com/LibriVox/[/url]
[i]The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them.[/i]
~Mark Twain

Gesine
Posts: 14151
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » March 5th, 2006, 5:24 am

Welcome, Mariann! :)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

pipacsos
Posts: 33
Joined: March 3rd, 2006, 4:57 pm

Post by pipacsos » March 7th, 2006, 9:13 pm

Thank you for the inspiring words and for the adventurous links about copyright ;) You seem to be a great team here, I love it!!!
Just after recording my first fable by Aesop my brandnew mike ist kaputt gegangen :(
Wish me luck for the next story. :)

Mariann
Mariann

hugh
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 8000
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 4:14 am
Location: Montreal, QC
Contact:

Post by hugh » March 7th, 2006, 9:36 pm

no canadian works underway yet, which is a little embarassing ... a good friend of mine lived in a house with Thompson Highway -- I think it was a big coop sort of place -- in sudbury, ont. so: canadian lit with hungarian accent. what about leacock?

ps: welcome!

pipacsos
Posts: 33
Joined: March 3rd, 2006, 4:57 pm

Post by pipacsos » March 7th, 2006, 11:22 pm

hugh wrote:no canadian works underway yet, which is a little embarassing ... a good friend of mine lived in a house with Thompson Highway -- I think it was a big coop sort of place -- in sudbury, ont. so: canadian lit with hungarian accent. what about leacock?

ps: welcome!
Hi Hugh,

Oh my Gosh! What would I do to be able to get in contact with Tomson Highway!!! He would hang around in moccasins like the Canadian newpapers loved to present him just to fit the image he had to represent according to Canadian Commonlaw or something like that.... ;) and I would admire him with Hungarian accent and he would answer with some decent noise coming from the lower body. It would be just wonderful :D
I could have actually asked Paul Thompson, but I always found it much too pushy to do it for me. Some years ago he visited Hungary and I picked him up at the airport. I was totally K.O. and he had so much energy after a flight from Toronto to Budapest that I felt pretty embarrassed for wanting to grab for toothpicks to keep my eyes open like in "Tom and Jerry" (oh, do I have to insert a copyright sign here?? ;) ) Before I could introduce myself he asked me to tell him everything I know about him and his first question to me was what my favorite play was that he'd directed. Hahahaha. He was amazing. Anyway, I was preparing for my final exam in directing a canadian play and he visited the group I worked with, we had rehearsals together and then he persuaded me to write my thesis about Tomson's plays. It was a great time, I enjoyed it a lot.

Actually I really don't understand why CanLit is so underrepresented in GP with that zero number of works as you are telling me. I studied it for years, there must be some in the public domain according to the US law. OK, it is true that the most interesting ones were written after the 60s. But CanLit is probably just so protected from the public like Hungarian Literature. Part of the national heritage and it is better if you keep them so safe that possibly noone knows about them.

Anyway, I hated those 3kg anthologies the pages of which are seethrough, they are about 13 cm thick and in 1 mm of it you could have an entire novel. And if you want to read in a park, you need to hire a barrow to carry it.

Anyways, do you mean that Leacock would be funny just because I would read it?
:roll:

Is my accent really thaaaaat bad? (panicmonster hush hush hush)
I have sent a fable by Aesop into the Vol. 8 thread, please listen to it, and calm me that you understand it. If not, then please lie. I would be very grateful :D

Mariann
Mariann

hugh
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 8000
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 4:14 am
Location: Montreal, QC
Contact:

Post by hugh » March 7th, 2006, 11:27 pm

there is some canlit in PG, just none to date at LV ... oh wait, not true: in flanders fields, by mcrae. OK but no non-poetry. yet!

leacock is funny no matter who reads him, though it's been a while since i read him.

hugh
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 8000
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 4:14 am
Location: Montreal, QC
Contact:

Post by hugh » March 8th, 2006, 8:35 am

oh we also did some pauline johnson.

pipacsos
Posts: 33
Joined: March 3rd, 2006, 4:57 pm

Post by pipacsos » March 8th, 2006, 9:25 am

hugh wrote:oh we also did some pauline johnson.
are they already online? why can't I find it? I'd love to listen to Canadian lit. yes yes yes. Could you write me the thread in which you linked to the URL (yousentit or whatever) where I can listen to it?
Thanks,
Mariann
Mariann

kayray
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 11859
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 9:10 am
Location: Union City, California
Contact:

Post by kayray » March 8th, 2006, 10:49 am

Kara
http://kayray.org/
--------
"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

Post Reply