COMPLETE - Weekly Poetry - Song, by John Donne - PO/ll

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » January 17th, 2006, 12:21 pm

I think the poem has enough internal structure that the fact that those two don't now rhyme is unnoticeable (I hadn't noticed until I read this thread a minute ago).

I've done no research on this poem. I *would* like to know what that line means: "what wind serves to advance an honest mind".

Any offers?

**

All poems up to now have been downloaded and checked; thank you all. You've all paced yourselves well to suit the complicated theme.

ChipDoc
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Post by ChipDoc » January 17th, 2006, 10:23 pm

Those who turn to Donne's amorous verse will be first impressed by the antifeminist drift to much of it. To be sure, misogyny had found a voice in Shakespeare and almost everyone else, but in Donne the resentment of the moral falsity of women is notably caustic. Consider the song "Go and catch a falling star." The poet's persona gives a companion a whole list of things to do, a catalogue of impossibilities, running from the mythological, such as the opening line and the vulgar call to impregnate a mandrake root, to the realistic, such as learning to stave off envy or "find[ing]/ What wind/ Serves to advance an honest mind." Though the companion might be "born to strange sights" and "ride ten thousand days and nights," he will not be able to come back and tell the narrator that he has found "a woman true, and fair." The narrator then changes his mind, saying that if a woman who was beautiful and faithful could be found, "such a pilgrimage" would be "sweet" to make. Then he reverts to his contempt for the sex. Though he might find this fabled woman of both beauty and virtue "at next door," he would not make the journey, since though her virtue might last "till you write your letter," she could have trysted with "two, or three."
-from The McDaniel Lectures on British Literature
-Chip
[url]http://ChipDoc.com/LibriVox/[/url]
[i]The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them.[/i]
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peastman
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Post by peastman » January 17th, 2006, 11:45 pm

ChipDoc wrote:Try positioning the mic slightly above and off to one side of your mouth. That'll help reduce the popping considerably and it'll also give the recordings a much greater dynamic range.
My microphone sits on the desk next to my monitor, and that seems to work pretty well. (It's a Logitech USB microphone, acquired from Amazon for $20.) Wherever you put it, this is the important thing: the microphone should face toward you (so it will pick up your voice well), but you should NOT face directly toward it (so it won't get hit by a burst of air every time you say a p or d).

Peter

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » January 18th, 2006, 12:42 am

Thanks, Chip ... though, although the lecture quotes the line, there's no explanation of it. I'll have to ask one of my friends who lectures in this area herself.

Your quote will help me in my summary for the collection.

Peter

peastman
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Post by peastman » January 20th, 2006, 9:17 pm

Since no one else has suggested a poem for next week yet, I'll suggest "The Owl and the Pussycat", by Edward Lear. Gutenberg has it at

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/13650/13650-h/13650-h.htm#songs

Peter

LibraryLady
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Post by LibraryLady » January 20th, 2006, 9:39 pm

Great suggestion, Peter! Are you willing to coordinate this yourself? It would involve posting the poem and instructions on Sunday (you could copy Peter's first post in this thread and edit in the info for the new poem), collecting the files as they come in, checking/correcting filenames and ID3 tags, proof-listening for editing errors, collecting readers' names and URLs for the catalog, and then sending me all the files and information so I can catalog it. It's basically like coordinating a book, but on a much smaller scale. If you're interested in book coordinating eventually, this would be a great test run and I'll help out as much as you need. Just let me know!
Annie Coleman Rothenberg
http://www.anniecoleman.com/

"I hear the sound I love, the sound of the human voice." ~Whitman

Peter Why
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Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)

Post by Peter Why » January 21st, 2006, 12:16 am

Thanks, Peter,

It's a lovely poem.

Peter Why

kayvan
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Post by kayvan » January 21st, 2006, 4:07 pm

Peter Why wrote: Here's a complicated little poem by John Donne, who must just have been jilted when he wrote it.

Peter
Hi Peter!

I know the subject says COMPLETED, but I am submitting my late rendition of this poem for your consideration.

http://tinyurl.com/djazf

Best regards,

---Kayvan
--
Recording G. K. Chesterton's "Orthodoxy" (1908)
Kayvan Sylvan (kayvan AT sylvan DOT com)

LibraryLady
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Post by LibraryLady » January 21st, 2006, 6:12 pm

Hi Kayvan,

Peter handed the project over to me for cataloging but I had a feeling we might get some late entries so I held off. I got your recording, it sounds wonderful! It will be in the collection. :)

Annie
Annie Coleman Rothenberg
http://www.anniecoleman.com/

"I hear the sound I love, the sound of the human voice." ~Whitman

LibraryLady
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Post by LibraryLady » January 22nd, 2006, 12:17 pm

Catalog page is here: http://librivox.org/song-by-john-donne/

Please doublecheck to be sure your name and URL are as you wish them to appear. Thanks!
Annie Coleman Rothenberg
http://www.anniecoleman.com/

"I hear the sound I love, the sound of the human voice." ~Whitman

kayray
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Post by kayray » January 22nd, 2006, 12:34 pm

Whoops! We need to podcast one of these today! I'll get right on it. Or... no... should I podcast the one from last week? Yes. Gosh I'm confused. I'll figure it out :)

Thanks, Peter and Annie and readers!

kara
Kara
http://kayray.org/
--------
"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

LibraryLady
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Post by LibraryLady » January 22nd, 2006, 12:37 pm

Kara,

I think "I Do Not Love Thee" and "Where My Books Go" have not been podcast yet.

Thanks!
Annie Coleman Rothenberg
http://www.anniecoleman.com/

"I hear the sound I love, the sound of the human voice." ~Whitman

kayray
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Post by kayray » January 22nd, 2006, 12:56 pm

Yeah, I just took care of those -- posted them both today -- a double dose of poetry for our podcast subscribers. I'll podcast "Song" NEXT sunday... better write myself a note...
Kara
http://kayray.org/
--------
"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

LibraryLady
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Post by LibraryLady » January 22nd, 2006, 1:00 pm

Sounds good, Kara. :)
Annie Coleman Rothenberg
http://www.anniecoleman.com/

"I hear the sound I love, the sound of the human voice." ~Whitman

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