[COMPLETE] Short Stories 1859-63 by Elizabeth Gaskell - ans

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » February 26th, 2021, 9:30 pm

Here we go with an Italian Institution - the Camorra!

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/shortstories4_12_gaskell.mp3

I've renumbered and created space for the French songs in the MW.

Yes, we do have that edition of the collected works in the library. I'll take a look next time I'm there...

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » February 28th, 2021, 2:13 pm

Excellent! That's lucky, and I hope the library offers some form of click & collect for you to get those books, if it's safe(ish) to do so. I gather Sydney is doing okay, relatively speaking, if still being sensible about precautions.

Two notes for An Italian Institution:

9.54-9.57, bottom third p 94 second column
The Camorra demanded his mulct [heard mulet], it is true…
This is a genuine question – is ‘mulet’ with an E a word in Italian or a local dialect? (I’m sorry, I don’t know Italian!) Google translate’s first guess is that it’s Swedish for ‘overcast’. I’m aware of mulct with a C as a suitable verb, and this dictionary says it can be used as a noun as well:
https://www.lexico.com/definition/mulct
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.32106014328485&view=1up&seq=104
Later note: mulct is used at 12.35

11.54, p 95 first para first column, omission
...and by his intervention [is able to associate himself] with others...
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.32106014328485&view=1up&seq=105

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » March 2nd, 2021, 4:19 pm

Yes, definitely mulct - not a word I knew, but it has the right meaning.

I'll be a little slow with corrections on this from now on because I have moved this recording setup elsewhere, but we'll get there in the end. Everything is recorded - just the editing to do, but that can be a slow process with Mrs. G!

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » March 3rd, 2021, 6:40 am

I think I learned the word from reading Elizabeth Barrett Browning, but I can't remember for sure now. It's not something I use every day of my life!

No problem at all with the corrections. This project isn't going anywhere - the scans aren't, and I'm certainly not, so take your time!

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » March 3rd, 2021, 5:23 pm

I have just been having a look at the Pickering complete works in our library, which look like they have been barely touched since they were bought in 2005! They are interesting because each piece has a short introduction - I have been relying on Jenny Uglow's biography but she often has little or nothing to say about the shorter pieces.

This was interesting on the Ghost in the Garden Room: 'Dickens complained to John Forster that EG's plot 'did not in the least [belong] to the idea' he had stipulated to authors, namely, that all stories in the sequence would involve a haunting memory belonging to occupants of various rooms rather than traditional ghosts'. That puts paid to my idea that a ghost story should have a ghost! But I guess making it the haunting memory of the prosecuting lawyer was a bit of a stretch.

Another point of interest is that Dickens seems to have done a lot of sentence by sentence editorial work. Apparently she was writing stories for AYR quickly and saving what she saw as her best stuff for Cornhill Magazine. That may explain why I have been finding this particular collection difficult - I often have to read her sentences two or three times before I can get them to make sense.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » March 4th, 2021, 10:47 am

That's really exciting - I mean that these are being checked out of the library. That's what libraries are for!

This is fascinating. Please do keep these titbits coming as you read them. This project is turning into something educational well beyond even the usual diving into less well known corners of Gaskell's work!

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » March 8th, 2021, 11:27 pm


Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » March 10th, 2021, 4:14 am

My goodness, you weren't kidding about the amount of French in this article! Tackling it is something to be proud of!

4.43-4.44, p 448 second column end of para following poetry
...to be omitted.
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=454
This is dead fussy, but omitted sounded more like admitted – could you have a listen?

40.09-40.14, repetition, bottom p 453 second column first line
“Adieu m’amie, je m’en vas, (bis) “Adieu m’amie, je m’en vas, (bis)
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=459

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » March 16th, 2021, 4:18 am

Sitting the second, ready for PL!

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/shortstories4_11_gaskell.mp3 - 44:43
Text link: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=567

French is my best language as far as understanding goes, but the pronunciation is a nightmare. Let's hope nobody French listens to this!

On the errors below, the first should be 'admitted' - this is a case where Mrs. G's long sentences have confused me - I must have forgotten the 'nor were...' at the beginning and thought they would be omitted, not admitted.

The second is correct, I think - bis means 'again' so I have read it twice. Or have I misunderstood?
Newgatenovelist wrote:
March 10th, 2021, 4:14 am
My goodness, you weren't kidding about the amount of French in this article! Tackling it is something to be proud of!

4.43-4.44, p 448 second column end of para following poetry
...to be omitted.
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=454
This is dead fussy, but omitted sounded more like admitted – could you have a listen?

40.09-40.14, repetition, bottom p 453 second column first line
“Adieu m’amie, je m’en vas, (bis) “Adieu m’amie, je m’en vas, (bis)
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=459

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » March 16th, 2021, 11:25 am

That's absolutely fine - for Sitting the First, just do the first note and ignore the second. You can tell how non-existant my French is!

Notes for Sitting the Second are below. As with the previous section, I've flagged things but am a lot less confident about the French ones. If you check them and they're okay, no problem, because your French is far better than mine will ever be!


2.42, p 562 first column first stanza – is this an omission?
Doub, dan, doub, dans, [don, don,]
Don, don, don,
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=568

8.29, p 563 first column first 4 lines – an omission? maybe?
Qui demandaient, “Beau prince, [qui vous a mis ceans?] --Celui...
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=569

19.46-19.51, p 564 second column first para
And in the volume of Miscellanies published by Southey’s executors after his death...
https://www.lexico.com/definition/executor
This sounded more like an abbreviation of executioners than executors, though that could just be me and my fondness for ghost stories!
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=570

27.20, p 565 second column first (main) para, second half-ish, omission
“Good lack, Dion, I suffer drought! [Good lack, Dion, I suffer drought,] I could drink my own red blood!”

29.50, p 566 first column 1st-2nd sentences of translation following first extract, omission
...I rested myself by the clear water-spring. [In the clear water-spring] my hands I washed...
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=572

30.52, p 566 first column beginning of second extract, omission (?)
[Rossignolet des bois,] rossignolet sauvage,
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=572

33.16-33.18, bottom p 566 first column
“Maidens, get married, [heard marriage] for marriage is sweet.
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=572
Not a big change, but if you have the mic set up and fancy re-recording...

36.01-36.10, p 566 second column first stanza, repetition (?)
Apres tant de souffrance,
La voici vetue,
Apres tant de souffrance,
La voici vetue,
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0007706294&view=1up&seq=572

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » March 17th, 2021, 2:08 am

Thanks for doing these so quickly! It means I can get the done together with the earlier files this weekend.

These were nearly all editing mistakes, coming from the number of times I had to read certain lines when recording. Plus it wouldn't do suggest that Robert Southey was executed

The interesting thing about this piece is that it was only ascribed to Gaskell when Dickens's papers were made available in 2015 (He had written the authors names on his copies of the proofs). Hence it is not included in her Collected Works, which were published earlier, and Librivox may be the first to publish it under her name. Hurrah!

But how could anyone think that this was not written by Gaskell - especially after the Modern Greek Songs article in an earlier issue?

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Post by Newgatenovelist » March 19th, 2021, 1:01 pm

If you’d like to read more about Jeremy Parrott’s amazing find, you might want to type Leon Litvack’s name into Project Muse. I think he’s published on this, though it’s obviously an ongoing project. I will also just mention, without trying to sound hideously pedantic, that as far as I'm aware the handwriting identifying the authors is not known. It is known *not* to be Dickens's handwriting, but a definite name is still out of reach, more's the pity.

I take your point about it seeming plain as day once it’s been stood up next to the piece on Modern Greek Songs, but these things often do look more obvious in hindsight! The burden of proof is usually reasonably high, or at least an editor shouldn’t really wave it through to publication if the attribution is uncertain. There are different ways that can be done – for example, by finding a smoking gun, a letter from an editor to an author or vice versa saying ‘thank you for your story X, which will be published in issue Z, payment of Y to follow’. Those are, unsurprisingly, rare. If there is a large enough sample of ‘known to be by author X’ writing, using techniques from digital humanities can sometimes compare things like word usage or frequency from the ‘confirmed’ sample against the unattributed piece to see if the unattributed piece 'matches' well. That’s the short version. If you’d like to read a little bit more, the Curran Index is an index to a few 19th-century periodicals, and this page goes into a little bit more detail about attribution scholarship:
http://www.curranindex.org/scholarship

In the interests of full disclosure, I will admit that I’m trying to get one unsigned contribution attributed to a specific author. (I have unusual hobbies. Don't judge.) I have some evidence, but I need to go away and be a detective instead of trying to say ‘but I really think it was this person’!

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » March 20th, 2021, 3:35 am

Parts 10-12 corrected and ready for spot PL!

Where I have had to record, it doesn't sound brilliant, I'm afraid. I have abandoned the recording setup I used for this one, or rather I still have it but it has moved house so it just doesn't sound the same. You'll hear the new one when I set up Geraldine Jewsbury - it sounds a lot better. It involves a store called Bunnings (which you won't know, but Anne will), PVC piping and removal blankets, and it works very well!

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » March 20th, 2021, 3:40 am

So you are an expert! I'd be interested to know what the piece you are tracking down is, but only when you are successful!

Which leads me to ask what you think of this list of Jewsbury reviews in the Athenaeum? Is it reliable: https://athenaeum.city.ac.uk/reviews/contributors/contributorfiles/JEWSBURY,GeraldineEndsor.html

I was also wondering how to find her pieces in Household Words. The Curran Index?
Newgatenovelist wrote:
March 19th, 2021, 1:01 pm
If you’d like to read more about Jeremy Parrott’s amazing find, you might want to type Leon Litvack’s name into Project Muse. I think he’s published on this, though it’s obviously an ongoing project. I will also just mention, without trying to sound hideously pedantic, that as far as I'm aware the handwriting identifying the authors is not known. It is known *not* to be Dickens's handwriting, but a definite name is still out of reach, more's the pity.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » March 20th, 2021, 12:22 pm

Sections 10, 11, 12 are spot PL OK.

The new setup sounds marvellous. You have my nerdy envy! I hope it’s as comfy to record in as it is good at minimising unwanted external sounds, and I am absolutely looking forward to hearing it in its full glory with Jewsbury!

Calling me an expert is quite kind! I’m rather outside my usual area with this, but it’s very interesting and, if I’m lucky, will result in us all learning something new!

I’m not familiar with the Athenaeum project you linked to, but it looks sound and would probably be a very good place for starting and/or cross-checking what you’ve found.

With Household Words, you’re really in luck because lots of periodicals of this era have had nothing like the kind of funding and knowledge to back research into them that HW has had. You have two options, and I would suggest that you use both. There is the Dickens Journals Online:
https://www.djo.org.uk/
as well as the Curran Index:
http://www.curranindex.org/
I am not sure that the Curran Index has as much on Jewsbury or as long a run of HW as DJO, but give it a try. The search feature on DJO can be ever so slightly squirrelly but do stick with it. I’ve just spent all of two minutes looking at both sites, so you should turn up some good stuff if you actually properly search. To get the ball rolling an entry on Jewsbury in the DJO has a link to 18 articles of hers in HW:
https://www.djo.org.uk/indexes/authors/geraldine-endsor-jewsbury.html

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