[COMPLETE] Manchester Poetry by James Wheeler -ans

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
annise
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 33518
Joined: April 3rd, 2008, 3:55 am
Location: Melbourne,Australia

Post by annise » October 8th, 2020, 5:37 am

eggs4ears wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 3:26 am
Hi Anne,

I've tried to track down James Wheeler. He also wrote a book called 'Manchester: its political, social and commercial history, ancient and modern'. None of the library catalogue entries I have found have his dates of birth and death, so I guess they are unknown.

But should this really be by various authors and the individual poets catalogued? Some of them I know, and we have other items by them in the catalogue, and others I can't track down at all.

Phil
Re checker it was written by an admins husband for LV PLers so they could check a pile of files for the tech bits we need - it was always just meant to be a useful tool not a holy writ as it just covered the minimum requirements for LV files

It is up to you about making the poets searchable, when they are all in the same text. I wouldn't, but you are at liberty to disagree (and do all the work needed)
Anne

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 8th, 2020, 5:39 am

eggs4ears wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 3:10 am
It seems there were three anthologies of Manchester poems around that time. This one was 1838. Then there was the Athenaeum Souvenir in 1843, which we recorded a couple of years ago. The third is from 1842 and called 'The festive wreath, a collection of original contributions read at a literary meeting, held in Manchester, March 24th, 1842', which I keep searching for but haven't found yet.
How desperate are you for The Festive Wreath? Copies are listed as being held by the British Library, and you could check other deposit libraries not listed like the NLS. In the UK, the universities of Manchester, Leeds, Oxford and Bangor are showing, and in the States, Columbia, Cleveland Public Library, UNC Chapel Hill, Florida State, and Victoria uni in Canada.

You could try going through their library sites one by one and seeing 1. if they have a scan (for instance, I know Oxford have digitised some of their holdings, but I don't know which collections they've prioritised), or 2. what their policies and prices are on photocopying or scanning items for researchers, and what use can be made of the photocopies/scans. The other option is to google for people on the ground who support researchers by going in and doing the photographing (or similar). That might be more of a US thing (hiring someone local is obviously cheaper than a research trip to New Haven or Boston!), and concentrated around research unis, so Columbia is probably the best place to start if you try that method. From personal experience the Cleveland Public Library was unbelievably open, but I was visiting in person. I don't know if they will be able to get a photocopy or scan to you, but they might be friendly when communicating with them!

I feel like I've just given you double the homework you anticipated. Maybe you weren't *that* desperate for this title after all!

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 8th, 2020, 6:34 am

A review of a just-out novel set in 1860s Manchester about tensions between the police and Irish nationalists. The author works locally! Interested?
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/oct/08/the-abstainer-by-ian-mcguire-review-the-wire-by-gaslight



Notes for section 09:

4.03-4.05, first stanza p 130, omission
And with one [of] distant country...

13.31-13.35, p 140 second line
Where groups of dead lie buried beneath the sacred aisle,
I can’t get the accent on the E in ‘buried’ when I type it here, but should this be 3 syllables (bur-i-ed) rather than 2 (bur-ied)?

16.05-16.11, p 142 second stanza
As through their surge they onward urge
The [heard Their] ships on their wild course dashing.

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 8th, 2020, 12:06 pm

eggs4ears wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 3:10 am
There were quite a few collections by individual poets over the next 10-20 years and then it seems to die out. I don't know what it was about that period that produced so much poetry, or whether it was the whole country or just Manchester.
People who know about these things have said that the newspapers and journals and other periodical publications in the 19th century were much more varied than people now often realise. Local newspapers would publish poetry by local people, and it was read and circulated in ways that seem alien to many people now who can read the LA Times on their smartphones from another continent. I gather that some if not all of these poems were previously published, so it's possible that this book was picking up on a thriving literary scene that, at this distance, has been overshadowed by Gaskell!


Notes for section 10 - glad to see Bamford hadn't lost his fighting spirit by the time he wrote some of these!

1.34-1.37, p 148 first stanza
Dwelt on [heard upon] the tongue of that strange thing,


A note for potential off-LV work: the first website gives two pronunciations (including the one you use). The second site (the one based on the free OED) is stricter – that may be the pronunciation requested if you’re doing other projects.
https://howjsay.com/search?word=viand
https://www.lexico.com/definition/viand

eggs4ears
Posts: 1476
Joined: February 4th, 2011, 9:06 am
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact:

Post by eggs4ears » October 11th, 2020, 5:16 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_11_wheeler.mp3 - 12:01
https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_12_wheeler.mp3 - 31:02

The last two poetry sections ready for PL! Just the introduction to edit, which may be more interesting after reading the poems.

I rather like Ner Gardiner, but I have no idea how to say his name! The Miscellany is certainly a miscellany - I enjoyed Aetna - first poem I have read about climbing a mountain!

I am piling up corrections for later this week, but I will correct 'viand'. I am pronouncing it as if it were French, and it isn't.

What you say about newspapers and periodicals is interesting. I think many of these would have been printed in newspapers and perhaps circulated privately. Much depends on who James Wheeler was, which I cannot find out. There were also the poetry sessions at the Sun Inn around that time that are mentioned in histories of that period.

Thanks also for your research skills on the Festive Wreath! I may follow up on that. I am pretty sure there is a copy in Chethams Library in Manchester, but it looks like it will be a long time before I get back to England again :(

eggs4ears
Posts: 1476
Joined: February 4th, 2011, 9:06 am
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact:

Post by eggs4ears » October 11th, 2020, 5:17 pm

This is an offer I can't refuse!

I guess it is a matter of editing the metadata? I've had a go for Ner Gardiner, could you let me know if I have done it properly?

I think is only worthwhile for some of the authors, though, as many are probably unpublished elsewhere. Byrom, Bamford, Gardiner & Ainsworth should be in the catalogue already. Swain isn't but probably should be.

I've also changed the titles to 'Poems by John Byrom', etc. as that would make more sense as a search result.
annise wrote:
October 8th, 2020, 5:37 am
It is up to you about making the poets searchable, when they are in the same text. I wouldn't, but you are at liberty to disagree (and do all the work needed)
Anne

annise
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 33518
Joined: April 3rd, 2008, 3:55 am
Location: Melbourne,Australia

Post by annise » October 11th, 2020, 5:30 pm

BCs only need to enter the author name and text and language .
the times and link happen in the cataloguing ( the link has to because we don't know what it is until it reaches Archive )
In this particular case the text and language don't change so you only need the author

Anne

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 12th, 2020, 7:14 am

eggs4ears wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 5:16 pm
What you say about newspapers and periodicals is interesting. I think many of these would have been printed in newspapers and perhaps circulated privately. Much depends on who James Wheeler was, which I cannot find out. There were also the poetry sessions at the Sun Inn around that time that are mentioned in histories of that period.

Thanks also for your research skills on the Festive Wreath! I may follow up on that. I am pretty sure there is a copy in Chethams Library in Manchester, but it looks like it will be a long time before I get back to England again :(
Anything you want to do about the Sun Inn? Sounds tempting, speaking as a PL...

I don't know when either of us will next see our respective corners of the UK. I'm trying not to think about it. Trying to be positive, maybe 'proxy' or long-distance research will be be a way to feel closer to home while travelling is off-limits for many reasons.

Another possibility for Lancashire authors is the Working Class Movement Library. Some of the writers with a regional/local interest - most obviously, someone like Bamford - could overlap with their holdings. You never know, you might be lucky!


One definite note for section 11, one that I think might need redoing but could be a mistake:

9.28-9.31, p 170 second half of poem
And towering mountains spiring [heard spring] to the sky-
I take it ‘spire’ is being used as a verb, poetically saying climbing to the sky, but it may be a typo!

Outro omitted

eggs4ears
Posts: 1476
Joined: February 4th, 2011, 9:06 am
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact:

Post by eggs4ears » October 12th, 2020, 3:15 pm

https://library.chethams.com/blog/robert-rose-the-bard-of-colour/

There is something on the Sun Inn on this blog post. It confirms what I half-remembered, that the Sun Inn was the venue for the Festive Wreath meeting. Also that some of these poems were published individually as broadsheeets, or I am not sure what you would call them if they are a few pages long.

How wonderful it would be to sit in Chethams Library and record that Robert Rose collection!

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 13th, 2020, 8:28 am

eggs4ears wrote:
October 12th, 2020, 3:15 pm
How wonderful it would be to sit in Chethams Library and record that Robert Rose collection!
Thank you for that link, this is fascinating. And I'm absolutely sold on this idea - wouldn't that be marvellous!

eggs4ears
Posts: 1476
Joined: February 4th, 2011, 9:06 am
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact:

Post by eggs4ears » October 13th, 2020, 8:08 pm

Introduction ready for PL and I am working on corrections for the other files now...

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_00_wheeler.mp3 - 19:45

eggs4ears
Posts: 1476
Joined: February 4th, 2011, 9:06 am
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact:

Post by eggs4ears » October 13th, 2020, 9:12 pm

Chapters 7-11 all corrected and uploaded

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 14th, 2020, 12:44 pm

Notes for section 12:


1.21-1.25, p 175 penultimate line
Beheld by all, like spires [heard spirits] of grass,

4.42-4.45, p 178 last stanza
Like Tophet for her prey:
https://www.lexico.com/definition/tophet
https://howjsay.com/search?word=Tophet

12.40-12.44, p 184 second stanza first line
Divine Religion!-by [heard be] thy Sire’s decree,

15.29-15.31, p 186 first stanza
Through paltry gold [heard God] I was betrayed.

20.14-20.17, p 190 first line
Ah! such were then the jocund plays, [heard days]

21.02-21.05, p 190 third stanza
Thy [heard The] well-earned honours on the ground;

28.50-28.53, p 198 second stanza
From Albion’s isles [heard sides] the monarch came,

30.40-30.44, p 200 penultimate line extra word
Whose glory is [like] a falling star,

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 14th, 2020, 1:44 pm

Section 7-11 are spot PL OK!
Erin

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 3326
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » October 15th, 2020, 2:13 am

Section 00 is PL OK. You're right, that was quite interesting after having listened to the poets themselves. I wonder what listeners will make of it!

Post Reply