[COMPLETE] Manchester Poetry by James Wheeler -ans

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » September 20th, 2020, 10:50 am

Notes for section 4:


2.21-2.25, p 54 first stanza, omission
The proud “Fitz-James,” with martial step, and [dark] intrepid eye;

2.30-2.36, p 54 first stanza
And she,-the bold, the [heard and] beautiful!-sweet “Lady of the Lake.”

3.08-3.13, last stanza p 54, self-correction
...”Julia” by his side, whose tears were fall- whose tears were flowing fast;

4.14-4.17, last stanza p 55
Next rode [heard rose], in melancholy guise...

4.19-4.25, last stanza p 55
Sir Edward, Laird [heard Lord] of Ellieslaw, the far-renowned “Black Dwarf;”
There’s a laird at 5.11-5.12 if you think you can get it to work!

5.09-5.12, p 56 middle stanza
And “Dumbeidikes,” that [heard the] silent laird...

8.47-8.51, p 60 last stanza, extra word
The lilac-bower perfume [of] our favourite spot-

9.23-9.25, p 61 last stanza
Thus [heard The] murmuring faint and low,-

11.41-11.44, epigraph p 65, false start first line
...ces longs ru- ces long rugissemens,

18.11-18.15, middle stanza p 72
Thou [heard The] terror of the strong!

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » September 21st, 2020, 11:20 pm

So many notes! I think he must have sent me to sleep while I was reading :) Anyway, I'll have to let the notes pile up until I can get back to the room I recorded in.

I recorded this on a portable recorder, while I was away from my 'good' setup. The recording levels were quite low, so I guess the amplification has increased the background noise. The files are probably all similar, so I'll look after that as I go along.

What does Checker check for? Is it checking if the files are ACX compatible?
Newgatenovelist wrote:
September 18th, 2020, 6:38 am
Ah yes, I see what you mean. Although 'The Prince of the Storm' was good fun!

Word perfect notes for section 3 below. When I run the files through Checker, some of them are showing a fair bit of background noise (the point at which it flags it is around 40 db). Section 3 is just below the cutoff, but sections 2 and 4 are a little over. Have you perhaps altered something in your setup between recording sessions?

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Post by eggs4ears » September 21st, 2020, 11:32 pm

And Parts 5 & 6 ready for PL

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_05_wheeler.mp3 - 4:05
https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_06_wheeler.mp3 - 15:07

Ainsworth is fun. A poem about a mandrake!

Zoe: I read about the book in Jenny Uglow's biography of Elizabeth Gaskell. Geraldine Jewsbury was a friend and neighbour in Manchester. Zoe was published a couple of years before Mary Barton and 'scandalised' everyone.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » September 22nd, 2020, 8:05 am

You're right, Ainsworth is pretty cool. Perfect to get in the mood for Halloween!

Checker is a tool designed - I think, but don't quote me on this - for LV use. It won't help you if you're doing ACX work. Depending on how sensitive you have your settings, it will tell you if the background noise is a bit high and things like that. It also, or mainly, hits the LV requirements - if the volume is within range, if the file is in mono rather than stereo and I think maybe if its 128kbps. It's another tool that's there to use, so I use it! It was also very helpful for me as a completely new reader: I had no experience with a mic, and having even a small tool that could tell me why those mysterious numbers I had to get right were wrong was so useful.

Zoe sounds promising. Scandalous is good!



Section 5

1.16-1.19, p 78 third line
Calls on crimes from mem’ry [heard memory] faded,

3.26-3.29, p 82 first stanza
While those [heard these] accents melt away;


Section 6

2.37-2.41, p 87 last stanza
“Ah, well-a-day!” that [heard the] sexton gray unto himself did cry,

6.12-6.14, p 90 second stanza extra word
“If this be [a] dream…

6.22-6.25, p 90 second stanza extra word
But nail me not in [a] coffin fast...

7.56-7.58, p 92 bottom half first stanza
Is [heard In] her warm cheek seen.

11.21-11.24, p 96 first stanza
O’er the unctuous earth of graves,
https://www.lexico.com/definition/unctuous


My usual all-purpose note: For the record, I think your pronunciation of Gitanilla was probably precisely what Ainsworth intended. English pronunciations of Spanish from the first half of the 19th century sound a bit strange to modern ears – Byron rhyming Don Juan with ‘true one’ is the classic example! This is purely for future reference. What looks like a double L is actually a single character in Spanish, and sounds a bit like a Y. Probably the best example you might already know is ‘tortilla’.
https://forvo.com/search/gitanilla/

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » September 26th, 2020, 5:50 am

Parts 2-6 corrected and uploaded. Thanks for being so attentive - that was really an epic correction session!

The only one I haven't done is 'mem'ries' - You meant that I pronounce the 'o' as a syllable, is that right? But after several attempts that was the closest I could get. Also, oddly, I couldn't find a gap between the 'm' and the 'r' that I could cut out. I think the effect must be something to do with the way I sound out the 'm' (a bit like 'mb', so I am saying 'membries').

I did correct gitanilla. The problem is that I learned Spanish a long time ago and now I know Portuguese and Italian much better, and both have the pronunciation more like English 'million'. (Actually, I don't know any of them very well and if I have to speak, it usually comes out as a mixture of all three).

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » September 26th, 2020, 11:27 am

Sections 2, 3, 5, 6 are spot PL OK.

For section 4, my original note said
4.19-4.25, last stanza p 55
Sir Edward, Laird [heard Lord] of Ellieslaw, the far-renowned “Black Dwarf;”
There’s a laird at 5.11-5.12 if you think you can get it to work!
but I think perhaps 'lord' has been cut out but not yet been replaced with Laird, if you were taking it from elsewhere in the file.

No problem at all about memory - and yes, I was querying two versus three syllables. I certainly wasn't noting anything about how you sound the M.

My goodness, are there any languages you don't know?
I did correct gitanilla. The problem is that I learned Spanish a long time ago and now I know Portuguese and Italian much better, and both have the pronunciation more like English 'million'. (Actually, I don't know any of them very well and if I have to speak, it usually comes out as a mixture of all three).

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » September 29th, 2020, 4:15 am

Part 4 corrected and uploaded - That's right, I was attempting a transplant and forgot to put the new bit in. Lucky I'm not a surgeon!

And Part 7 ready for PL...

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_07_wheeler.mp3 - 12:36

French is the only language I know well enough to speak and read - the others are all mainly reading knowledge, and as you have seen, my pronunciation is awful! One of the main things I've learned from reading for Librivox is that I don't even know English that well!

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » September 29th, 2020, 6:25 am

Part 4 is spot PL OK. Notes for 7 below.
One of the main things I've learned from reading for Librivox is that I don't even know English that well!
You're not alone in this! Recording has opened up whole new vistas of ways to second guess myself, during prep, during recording, during editing, even after uploading... I certainly had no idea it would be like this when I started!


0.38-0.41, p 101 fifth line
Gave a soothing repose [heard response] to the splendours of noon,

5.57-6.01, p 105 third line second stanza
That frowns on [heard upon] the brink of the Ehn’s sweet river,

6.04-6.07, p. 105 second stanza fifth line
For he was the lord of the region around, [heard round]

6.21-6.25, p 105 mid-stanza second stanza
He paced the dark [heard dank] ramparts of Egremond round,

7.59-8.01, p 106 mid-page
That boon thou shalt [heard shall] obtain.

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » September 30th, 2020, 4:29 am

Part 7 corrected and uploaded.

The second correction reminds me that despite my best efforts, I could find no source on the pronunciation of 'Ehn'. I went with 'Ain', but it is now the River Ehen, which suggests it might be 'Een'. I spent many happy minutes on YouTube watching a man salmon fishing in the River Ehen, but sadly he didn't say its name out loud.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » September 30th, 2020, 7:33 am

One note for section 7 - I'm going to guess that the original line was cut out, but the replacement hasn't been inserted:
6.21-6.25, p 105 mid-stanza second stanza
He paced the dark [heard dank] ramparts of Egremond round,
I've never seen a fishing video on youtube for pronunciations! I have thoroughly mixed up its algorithms trying to find pronunciations for place names and people's names in amongst the regular things I use it for. I'm sorry that your search didn't yield what you hoped. Sometimes we just have to make our best guess and hope it's right.

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » October 2nd, 2020, 6:01 am

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_08_wheeler.mp3 - 16:40

Part 8 ready for PL. You may be able to detect a question in my tone of voice: 'What would make someone want to write a poem about the destruction of Sodom'?

Yes, it looks like I accidentally deleted the whole line while I was making that correction :(

btw, I gave up on Urania, first, because a great deal of it is narrated by a goddess, but also because it doesn't have much of a story to it. On the other hand, I have started recording the Master-Girl, which is just my kind of book! It definitely should have been in the Newcastle series!
Newgatenovelist wrote:
September 30th, 2020, 7:33 am
One note for section 7 - I'm going to guess that the original line was cut out, but the replacement hasn't been inserted:
6.21-6.25, p 105 mid-stanza second stanza
He paced the dark [heard dank] ramparts of Egremond round,
I've never seen a fishing video on youtube for pronunciations! I have thoroughly mixed up its algorithms trying to find pronunciations for place names and people's names in amongst the regular things I use it for. I'm sorry that your search didn't yield what you hoped. Sometimes we just have to make our best guess and hope it's right.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » October 2nd, 2020, 10:20 am

Soooooo excited that the Master-Girl looks like a sort of shadow member of the Newcastle series! I'm looking forward to hearing it - you're teasing me with this preview of projects to come!

I'm not sure why someone would want to write a poem about the destruction of Sodom, let alone one that was longer than the extracts printed here. This collection is a fascinating cross-section of poetry from the first half of the 19th century that's been almost forgotten now. I'm not sure that, if you ask me in a year or two, I will remember all of it - it's not my new favourite, but it's far from the worst I've ever read which is memorable for all the wrong reasons - but I like it. Some is pretty fun (Ainsworth!), and it's a really worthwhile project to take on. Exploring the less famous stuff on the Internet Archive is generally more interesting than making a beeline for the classics, and it's dead exciting when you do turn up a neglected gem.

Notes for section 8:

1.29-1.34, bottom p 113, repetition
...some, iron-hearted, rent rent
The sky with horrid shrieks...

12.01-12.04, p 120 last stanza, omission
Thou hast seen,-[thou hast seen,] in thy deathless career,

13.32-13.37, p 121 last stanza
Again wert thou call’d to look earthward, [heard eastward] and lo!

16.05-16.10, p 124 penultimate stanza, extra word
And then when [the] pyramids totter and fall,
And the marble is worn away;

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » October 8th, 2020, 3:10 am

Notes on Part 8 noted, thank you! I'll deal them later.

And here is Part 9 - https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/mancpoetry_09_wheeler.mp3 - 19:01

This is William Mort. A while ago, you sent me a link to a BBC show on interpretations of Wordsworth, with Helen Mort, who I enjoyed very much. It would be nice to think she is a descendant. It's an unusual name.

It seems there were three anthologies of Manchester poems around that time. This one was 1838. Then there was the Athenaeum Souvenir in 1843, which we recorded a couple of years ago. The third is from 1842 and called 'The festive wreath, a collection of original contributions read at a literary meeting, held in Manchester, March 24th, 1842', which I keep searching for but haven't found yet.

There were quite a few collections by individual poets over the next 10-20 years and then it seems to die out. I don't know what it was about that period that produced so much poetry, or whether it was the whole country or just Manchester.

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Post by eggs4ears » October 8th, 2020, 3:26 am

Hi Anne,

I've tried to track down James Wheeler. He also wrote a book called 'Manchester: its political, social and commercial history, ancient and modern'. None of the library catalogue entries I have found have his dates of birth and death, so I guess they are unknown.

But should this really be by various authors and the individual poets catalogued? Some of them I know, and we have other items by them in the catalogue, and others I can't track down at all.

Phil

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Post by eggs4ears » October 8th, 2020, 4:47 am


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