COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 077 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Post Reply
Sue Anderson
Posts: 4102
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » August 9th, 2020, 1:45 pm

Hi Michael, Glad to see you back! :) I've entered your contribution of Theodore Roosevelt's speech "Strength and Decency" in the Magic Window. Your source is in the public domain. :) What happens between here, and when your recording is ready to catalog are these steps:
1) As Book Coordinator (BC), I check to see that your recording passes the LibriVox Checker app (it does), and that the file name is formatted correctly (it isn't!), and that all the information we need provided about the recording is given in your post (it isn't)...

2) our Dedicated Proof Listener Soupy (Craig) will listen to your recording while following along with the text, and if there are any corrections needed, he'll let you know here on the thread.

3) You'll need to make any corrections to the recording which Craig has suggested, and you'll also need to correct the file name and provide needed info about the recording, and re-submit here. There is 2-week deadline for these things to be done.

File names can be tricky when you first start recording, and we all make mistakes with the names on occasion. So, it's no big deal! But they do need to be correct! Please take a close look at my instructions above, #2 and #4.

To help you out this time, here is how your file name will need to look, when you upload next time:

snf077_strengthanddecency_roosevelt_mb_128kb

[title of work and author's name separated by _ last name of author only]

And we need these bits of info about the recording ( as per #4 in instructions): title, author, link, timing.

Please wait for Craig to PL your selection before you do anything about the file name.

Thank you for your contribution to Volume 077! :)

soupy
Posts: 4133
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » August 9th, 2020, 1:47 pm

The world needs some positive fanaticism.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

soupy
Posts: 4133
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » August 9th, 2020, 2:10 pm

Thanks for the speech from Roosevelt Michael :D

I used this link for the text since some can't get into Haithitrust
https://archive.org/details/cabotlodgeroose00theorich/page/228/mode/1up

PLOK :thumbs:

Craig
The world needs some positive fanaticism.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
Posts: 4102
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » August 9th, 2020, 4:35 pm

Hi Craig, Thanks for this continuation of essays on Kierkegaard's works! :)

I only heard two small errors.

30:29 (page 222) "He has arrived at the perception that "subjectivity is the truth," --a doubtful proposition..." You said "a double proposition."

33:16 (page 223) "For as there are exhibited to us from different periods..."
You said "For as these"
-----------



The only thing I might add is what I (think I) found out about the Greek term άπαξ λεγόμενον, which occurs at 21:55 (page 219). I don't know Ancient Greek, but I typed the letters as they appeared into the essay into the Typit app [https://greek.typeit.org/] and then ran the phrase through Google translate, which came up with what would seem to be a reasonable translation of the term: "once called." That gave me the idea to further persue this by running the Greek phrase through Google, which came up with this: "Hapax legomenon" [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hapax_legomenon]

Hapax legomenon is a transliteration of Greek ἅπαξ λεγόμενον, meaning "(something) being said (only) once" (Wikipedia).

This makes sense in context of what Kierkegaard is contending, that his category is unique (i.e. "once called.")

"In so far as S. Kierkegaard claims this category as a sort of discovery, and admits no other predecessor to himself in it except Socrates, this is only quite correct in reference to the highly individual manner in which he has maintained this category, and which doubtless may be described as a άπαξ λεγόμενον.
(Martensen)

Maybe one of the Ancient Greek scholars on LibriVox could provide clarification if you wanted to pursue it.

soupy
Posts: 4133
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » August 9th, 2020, 7:15 pm

Here is a corrected copy Sue.

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf077__vinetandkierkegaard_martensen_cc_128kb.mp3

38:33

Leni said I can pronounce as it is in English.

Hapax legomenon

Thanks for listening and helping me out.

Craig
The world needs some positive fanaticism.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
Posts: 4102
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » August 10th, 2020, 4:03 am

soupy wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 7:15 pm
Here is a corrected copy Sue.

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf077__vinetandkierkegaard_martensen_cc_128kb.mp3

38:33

Leni said I can pronounce as it is in English.

Hapax legomenon

Thanks for listening and helping me out.

Craig
Everything PL OK now! :) And thanks to Leni for help with the Greek! :)

BettyB
Posts: 2312
Joined: July 7th, 2015, 10:12 pm

Post by BettyB » August 13th, 2020, 8:10 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf077_smallestcapitalineurope_trevor_bbs_128kb.mp3

Time is 18.53
"The Smallest Capital in Europe" from
Montenegro: a land of warriors by Roy Trevor (1869-1922)

Copyright 1913

https://archive.org/details/montenegrolandof00trevuoft/page/18/mode/2up

BettyB

Sue Anderson
Posts: 4102
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » August 14th, 2020, 5:18 am

BettyB wrote:
August 13th, 2020, 8:10 pm

"The Smallest Capital in Europe" from
Montenegro: a land of warriors by Roy Trevor (1869-1922)

Copyright 1913
Many thanks, Betty! :D "Montenegro has been historically at the crossroads of multiculturism..." [Wikipedia]

soupy
Posts: 4133
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » August 14th, 2020, 7:11 am

Hi Betty

I can't find pages 22-23?

Craig
The world needs some positive fanaticism.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
Posts: 4102
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » August 14th, 2020, 8:55 am

soupy wrote:
August 14th, 2020, 7:11 am
Hi Betty

I can't find pages 22-23?

Craig
Craig, I think this copy is complete: https://archive.org/details/montenegrolandof00trev/page/22/mode/2up

soupy
Posts: 4133
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » August 14th, 2020, 9:42 am

Thanks for the story of Montenegro Betty and thanks for the link Sue - I put the new link in the window.

One error noted:

5:48 At the far end of this miniature plain nestles a cluster of houses – we have reached Cetinje -- forgot to say we have reached

Craig
The world needs some positive fanaticism.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

BettyB
Posts: 2312
Joined: July 7th, 2015, 10:12 pm

Post by BettyB » August 16th, 2020, 4:49 pm


soupy
Posts: 4133
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » August 16th, 2020, 6:02 pm

Montenegro is PLOK Betty :thumbs:

Craig
The world needs some positive fanaticism.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age. 3 sections left

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

ColleenMc
Posts: 1773
Joined: April 9th, 2017, 5:57 pm

Post by ColleenMc » August 17th, 2020, 11:11 am

I have a matched pair of articles this month, both by the same author:


"The Bittern in the Norfolk Broads" by Emma L. Turner (1867-1940)

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf077_bitterninnorfolkbroads_turner_cm_128kb.mp3

13:24

Source: https://archive.org/details/britishbirds1319191920lond/page/4/mode/2up




"Further Notes on the Bittern in the Norfolk Broads" by Emma L. Turner

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf077_furthernotesonbittern_turner_cm_128kb.mp3

5:04

Source: https://archive.org/details/britishbirds1319191920lond/page/34/mode/2up



Emma Turner seems like an interesting character--here's her Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_Turner_(photographer)

I encountered her serendipitously from proof listening to TND's delightful recording of Through Broadland in a Breydon Punt by Arthur Henry Patterson. I had never heard of Patterson (or the Broads for that matter) until I randomly decided to prooflisten TND's previous solo, another Patterson book, and fell a bit in love with the man's writing and the area and nature he describes. In Through Broadland, Patterson makes a passing reference to seeing Miss E.L. Thompson with her photography equipment in a marsh encampment, implying that this is a routine sort of encounter. This made me curious about Miss Thompson and I was off to see if I could track down any more info about her, and found her Wikipedia entry, which in turn pointed to the article she published in British Birds about the rediscovery of the thought-extinct bittern in the Broads. Once I found the actual article, I decided I had to record it! In browsing through the other issues of British Birds in the volume I found that she had submitted a follow up note the next month, so added that to the pile.

Now I'm not just a Patterson fan, but a Thompson fan, AND a British Birds magazine fan. This is what I love so much about doing Librivox--finding fascinating people and works that I'd never have encountered otherwise!

Colleen

Sue Anderson
Posts: 4102
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » August 17th, 2020, 12:48 pm

ColleenMc wrote:
August 17th, 2020, 11:11 am
I have a matched pair of articles this month, both by the same author:


"The Bittern in the Norfolk Broads" by Emma L. Turner (1867-1940)


"Further Notes on the Bittern in the Norfolk Broads" by Emma L. Turn


Emma Turner seems like an interesting character--here's her Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_Turner_(photographer)

I encountered her serendipitously from proof listening to TND's delightful recording of Through Broadland in a Breydon Punt by Arthur Henry Patterson. I had never heard of Patterson (or the Broads for that matter) until I randomly decided to prooflisten TND's previous solo, another Patterson book, and fell a bit in love with the man's writing and the area and nature he describes. In Through Broadland, Patterson makes a passing reference to seeing Miss E.L. Thompson with her photography equipment in a marsh encampment, implying that this is a routine sort of encounter. This made me curious about Miss Thompson and I was off to see if I could track down any more info about her, and found her Wikipedia entry, which in turn pointed to the article she published in British Birds about the rediscovery of the thought-extinct bittern in the Broads. Once I found the actual article, I decided I had to record it! In browsing through the other issues of British Birds in the volume I found that she had submitted a follow up note the next month, so added that to the pile.

Now I'm not just a Patterson fan, but a Thompson fan, AND a British Birds magazine fan. This is what I love so much about doing Librivox--finding fascinating people and works that I'd never have encountered otherwise!

Colleen
Hi Colleen, What a great trail of discovery! :D Truly, one of the engaging things about LibriVox is the chance encounters that lead you down paths you never expected to be on, and, for the curious of mind, the little quirky discoveries are great fun. Thank you for telling us how you found Miss Thompson encamped on the Norfolk Broads! :thumbs:

What Emma Turner has to say about the bittern's survival in post WWI Britain seemed to me to resonate today: "During the war the Bittern has steadily increased in numbers ... on the whole, the war has been a godsend to the birds of Great Britain because it has kept the majority of gunners and collectors busy elsewhere... [but] if the Bittern is to maintain in peace time the steady increase in numbers which it has attained during the war, public opinion must be enlisted on its side..."

Here in the Chicago area, the Chicago Tribune has been running a series about the endangered Piping Plovers, which have been breeding on the bather-free beaches along Lake Michigan https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/breaking/ct-piping-plovers-montrose-farewell-20200804-usdyx2lggbcoxb4fo5n53gtdca-story.html

Post Reply