COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 065 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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soupy
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Post by soupy » April 30th, 2019, 6:56 am

Thanks for the historical look at Palestine and the French and English mandate Betty :D

Your reading is PLOK :thumbs:

Craig

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 4th, 2019, 1:28 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf065_flour_anonymous_sa_128kb.mp3
2:21

"Motor Truck Hauls Geneva Belle Flour"

from: The American Miller and Processor, Vol. 41, October 1, 1913
https://books.google.com/books?id=Dcs0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA782&lpg=PA782&dq=geneva+belle+flour&source=bl&ots=v4_9Oz8rO6&sig=ACfU3U1Y-4GtUABzMvfRxKqAIEtYFpuzSQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj_hcvHov7hAhUXIDQIHZg_BvEQ6AEwDHoECAcQAQ#v=onepage&q=geneva%20belle%20flour&f=false

A vignette from Illinois history. The water mill that produced Geneva Belle flour ceased operating years ago, and subsequently burned down. However, the heavy cast-iron drive shaft and beveled gears that transmitted power from the water turbines were salvaged and made into an interesting but decidedly eccentric sculpture that stands today on the site of the old mill:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h9WlfC7f2A

soupy
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Post by soupy » May 4th, 2019, 2:01 pm

Thanks for the history lesson Sue. PLOK :thumbs:

Craig

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 4th, 2019, 2:28 pm

PM to headandheart


Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 7th, 2019, 8:04 am

Hi Craig, Thanks for these letters from Anselm of Canterbury! :) We will be adding St. Anselm the catalog. Your readings are PL OK. What I found interesting from these two letters was the "modernity" of the concerns, and the fact that Anselm considered the possibility that Muriardachus, although "king," was functionally illiterate: "If therefore your excellence is unable to read for yourself the sayings of the Holy Scriptures ... desire the bishops and clerks regular who are in your kingdom to read them to you, so that having learnt them, you may perceive with what anxious care you should investigate and take measures for the correction of ... evil."


soupy
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Post by soupy » May 7th, 2019, 9:37 am

Thanks Sue :D

I put it there because people were told NOT to treat their wives like property as long as 1000 years ago.

I might read more from the Saint from Canterbury.

Craig

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 7th, 2019, 12:47 pm

soupy wrote:
May 7th, 2019, 9:37 am
Thanks Sue :D

I put it there because people were told NOT to treat their wives like property as long as 1000 years ago.

I might read more from the Saint from Canterbury.

Craig
"I might read more from the Saint from Canterbury."
That would be great! :)

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 16th, 2019, 12:55 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf065_colorblindness_dalton_sa_128kb.mp3
17:08

https://books.google.com/books?id=jYkyAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

"Colorblindness, An Early Account (1794)"
by John Dalton (1766-1844)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dalton

A few weeks ago, the NYTimes had an interesting "letter of recommendation" for a new phone app, which could improve color perception for colorblind persons, and could also simulate colorblindness for persons with normal color vision. The article mentioned that the English scientist John Dalton had written, from his own experience, the first scientific account of colorblindness in 1794. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/05/magazine/letter-of-recommendation-color-blind-pal.html?searchResultPosition=1

We don't have this John Dalton in the catalog yet, so I decided to record this.

soupy
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Post by soupy » May 17th, 2019, 8:08 am

"Colorblindness, An Early Account (1794)"
by John Dalton (1766-1844) - He is best known for introducing the atomic theory into chemistry, and for his research into colour blindness, sometimes referred to as Daltonism in his honour.

Thanks Sue.

I have a question about the reading of crossed out yellow and written in blue at 7:19

He can see yellow, blue and purple - the different shades of yellow would include green. Yellow and green are one color. So it must have been contrast of green and purple and not green as yellow. Someone corrected his observation but should we accept it? Marked it plok.

PLOK :thumbs:

Craig

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 17th, 2019, 8:55 am

The Linda Hall Science, Engineering and Technology Library holds the original 1798 copy of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society Memoirs, (of which the google copy is a copy):
http://lhldigital.lindahall.org/cdm/pageflip/collection/color/id/5574/type/compoundobject/show/5556/cpdtype/document/pftype/image#page/4/mode/2up The correction "blue" appears in the book held by the Linda Hall Library. Therefore, I accepted the word as a correction of a typographical error.

soupy
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Post by soupy » May 17th, 2019, 10:43 am

You are an excellent researcher Sue :D

Craig

KevinS
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Post by KevinS » May 19th, 2019, 8:54 am

I'm looking for an appropriate place for Thoreau`s `Wild Apples.` I think I can get it down to just over an hour. Is that too long for this collection? There are eight sections and Notes, but I think a reader would enjoy being able to listen to it in one go.
"E agora, José?"

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 19th, 2019, 10:03 am

KevinS wrote:
May 19th, 2019, 8:54 am
I'm looking for an appropriate place for Thoreau`s `Wild Apples.` I think I can get it down to just over an hour. Is that too long for this collection? There are eight sections and Notes, but I think a reader would enjoy being able to listen to it in one go.
Hi Kevin, The Short Nonfiction Collection would be a perfect place for Thoreau's Wild Apples. You can access a copy of the original text from the November 1862 issue of the Atlantic Monthly magazine here: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924077699944;view=1up;seq=519.

The current Atlantic Monthly magazine also has a copy of the text out on the internet: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1862/11/wild-apples/411517/. I did an unofficial word count on that text & came up with 9219 words. At a slow reading speed (say 150 words a minute), it would take about 62 minutes to read. Throw in the LibriVox intro and outro and you would still be under 74 minutes, which is the limit that will fit on a CD and so is the limit for a single SNF read.

You could start with the intention of the read being all of a piece, and if it ran too long, you could fit in a break. (We would then run the essay in 2 parts but in the same volume of SNF).

As book coordinator, I would prefer to see Thoreau's essay read as he wrote it, and that is--without footnotes! The edition of Wild Apples that is in Gutenberg is apparently a "critical edition" and is larded with footnotes that would ruin the flow of Thoreau's prose if read aloud. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/4066/4066-h/4066-h.htm. So, I am suggesting you use Hathi Trust (or similar) as your source for the read.

In looking into the essay Wild Apples, in order to respond to you, I ran across this contemporary appraisal of the essay, which I found interesting https://armenianweekly.com/2018/11/20/finding-the-moral-core-of-wild-apples/

Regards,

KevinS
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Post by KevinS » May 19th, 2019, 1:53 pm

Sue, thank you for the additional reference and the interesting read.

Here is the recording. I think you will be pleased---if you wish to listen---by how I place the notes at the end of the recording. It seems like an elegant enough solution.

The Checker tells me I'm overlong, but that must not be a hard and fast rule?

Wild Apples

Henry David Toreau

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf065_wildapples_thoreau_ks_128kb.mp3

1:01:45

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/4066/4066-h/4066-h.htm
"E agora, José?"

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