COMPLETE[PLAY]Every Man Out of His Humour by Jonson - thw

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alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » February 13th, 2019, 10:34 am

alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » February 13th, 2019, 11:32 am

Thank you.

Todd

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » February 14th, 2019, 1:52 am

alanmapstone wrote:
February 13th, 2019, 10:34 am
Mitis - prologue
https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/outofhumour_mitis_0.mp3
thank you, Alan

interesting that mitis is Latin for meek, gentle and soft while asper is rough and rude. Those two are surely meant to be allegories of the characters. So you are excellently trying to diffuse any hot-headedness here :thumbs:

I have one small note to make:

> at 4:30: “He has put you to it, sir.” – you say “put it to you”. Not sure if the meaning is exactly the same :hmm: because I don't really know what he means by it here :lol:

Sonia

alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » February 14th, 2019, 2:26 am

Kitty wrote:
February 14th, 2019, 1:52 am
I have one small note to make:

> at 4:30: “He has put you to it, sir.” – you say “put it to you”. Not sure if the meaning is exactly the same :hmm: because I don't really know what he means by it here :lol:
I think the meaning is different (although it would be difficult to say exactly why) so I will correct it when I do the act 1 lines.
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » February 14th, 2019, 2:37 am

Kitty wrote:
February 14th, 2019, 1:52 am
interesting that mitis is Latin for meek, gentle and soft while asper is rough and rude. Those two are surely meant to be allegories of the characters.
Jonson was a great classicist and often included aspects of classical drama in his work. Here he is probably harking back to the days when allegorical characters were used to comment on the actions of the human characters in a play.

Jonson was proud of his knowledge of Latin and Greek which is why he was so rude about Shakespeare's ability. :mrgreen:
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » February 14th, 2019, 9:35 am

alanmapstone wrote:
February 14th, 2019, 2:26 am
Kitty wrote:
February 14th, 2019, 1:52 am
I have one small note to make:

> at 4:30: “He has put you to it, sir.” – you say “put it to you”. Not sure if the meaning is exactly the same :hmm: because I don't really know what he means by it here :lol:
I think the meaning is different (although it would be difficult to say exactly why) so I will correct it when I do the act 1 lines.
I think it is the idea of "put you up to it," or even "dared you to it," in that the Prologue has just stormed off of the stage, so now Cordatus must speak the Prologue or else it won't be spoken. :lol:

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Post by Ealswythe » February 14th, 2019, 3:22 pm

Gad’s me! By my honour, I shall take on Lacy Puntarvalo, if you be so inclined! :D
Le silence va plus vite à reculons.

https://librivox.org/reader/11772

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Post by ToddHW » February 14th, 2019, 5:07 pm

Thank you.

Todd

alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » February 15th, 2019, 9:02 am

Mitis - Prologue and act 1

https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/outofhumour_mitis_1.mp3

This file contains the prologue lines, which you have already PLed, with the one correction at 4:30, plus the act 1 lines which begin at 5:10. You may need to delete my previously uploaded file which had a different name.
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » February 15th, 2019, 12:55 pm

alanmapstone wrote:
February 15th, 2019, 9:02 am
This file contains the prologue lines, which you have already PLed, with the one correction at 4:30, plus the act 1 lines which begin at 5:10. You may need to delete my previously uploaded file which had a different name.
I'll exchange the link in the MW. Well done, Alan, and the corrected line has such a wonderful mocking intonation :lol: :thumbs: Now I'm glad I mentioned it, the line has become better than way. All of Act 1 PL ok as well.

Thanks

Sonia

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Post by ZamesCurran » February 18th, 2019, 5:32 pm

Here is the Notary:

https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/outofhumour_notary_4_128kb.mp3

(I cleared it with silverquill to take over the role --- because I do notaries around here, dammit! ;-) )
Truth,
James
---------------------
"A Day Well Spent" - (origin of "Hello Dolly", in One Act 11)

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » February 18th, 2019, 7:32 pm

Thank you.

Todd

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Post by LexHankins » February 18th, 2019, 8:51 pm

Might I portray the Groom?
--
Lex (she/her)

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » February 19th, 2019, 5:59 am

LexHankins wrote:
February 18th, 2019, 8:51 pm
Might I portray the Groom?
Yes, and Welcome.

A few things about dramas. First off, and this applies to all Librivox projects, the instructions are all described in the first posting. Such things as the reference text, where to upload, the file names to use (with one file for each act in dramas).

For dramas you won't have to read any introduction or closing text - that is handled by the narrator/reader of the stage directions. But do include in your recordings a voice credit with the character name as given in the MW so I can assemble the cast list at the beginning of the play.

Also, when you record, leave good size gaps - several seconds at least - between each line. Including where a stage direction might interrupt a line. I need to cut your files apart to cut and paste each line into its place in the master files, and I need to be able to easily see where the line breaks are.

Enjoy, and pepper us with questions. We're here to help!

Thanks, Todd

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » February 19th, 2019, 12:29 pm

ZamesCurran wrote:
February 18th, 2019, 5:32 pm
(I cleared it with silverquill to take over the role --- because I do notaries around here, dammit! ;-) )
:lol: I remember you are keen on notaries. Well it's another great and dutiful performance, so thank you for that. All PL ok :thumbs:

thank you

Sonia

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