COMPLETE Guy Mannering or, The Astrologer by Walter Scott -ck

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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deongines
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Post by deongines » November 17th, 2018, 4:58 pm

Can I claim 24, 25, and 26? Thanks, Deon
Turning it over in your mind will not plow the field.

Carolin
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Post by Carolin » November 18th, 2018, 12:16 am

Thank you deon :D
Carolin

Please help us finish The Theory and Practice of Brewing and learn about beer!


DaveWindell
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Post by DaveWindell » November 20th, 2018, 5:37 am

Dear Carolin, Can I claim sections 54 and 55. Thanks! Dave

Carolin
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Post by Carolin » November 20th, 2018, 9:21 am

Sure, thank you :thumbs:
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jospe
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Post by jospe » November 21st, 2018, 1:21 am

Hey all, I am not sure how to read the following sentence from chapter 5:
Why, Mr. Mannering, people must have brandy and tea, and there’s none in the country but what comes this way; and then there’s short accounts, and maybe a keg or two, or a dozen pounds, left at your stable-door, instead of a d--d lang account at Christmas from Duncan Robb, the grocer at Kippletringan, who has aye a sum to make up, and either wants ready money or a short-dated bill.
I am not familiar with "d--d", am I just free to substitute -- as I please? Should I pronounce it as "dee dash dash dee" (it sort of doesn't make sense with the rest of the flowing text)? Also, for future reference, is there a standard or a preferred reading of ambiguous or incomplete words and phrases that are left for the reader to decide?

Thanks for your help!
-J

deongines
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Joined: November 2nd, 2012, 4:14 pm
Location: Salt Lake City UT

Post by deongines » November 21st, 2018, 10:27 am

Turning it over in your mind will not plow the field.

deongines
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Joined: November 2nd, 2012, 4:14 pm
Location: Salt Lake City UT

Post by deongines » November 21st, 2018, 10:28 am

Can I take 27, 28, and 29? Thanks, Deon
Turning it over in your mind will not plow the field.

Carolin
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Post by Carolin » November 21st, 2018, 11:31 am

Thank you deon!
Carolin

Please help us finish The Theory and Practice of Brewing and learn about beer!

Carolin
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Post by Carolin » November 21st, 2018, 11:36 am

jospe wrote:
November 21st, 2018, 1:21 am
Hey all, I am not sure how to read the following sentence from chapter 5:
Why, Mr. Mannering, people must have brandy and tea, and there’s none in the country but what comes this way; and then there’s short accounts, and maybe a keg or two, or a dozen pounds, left at your stable-door, instead of a d--d lang account at Christmas from Duncan Robb, the grocer at Kippletringan, who has aye a sum to make up, and either wants ready money or a short-dated bill.
I am not familiar with "d--d", am I just free to substitute -- as I please? Should I pronounce it as "dee dash dash dee" (it sort of doesn't make sense with the rest of the flowing text)? Also, for future reference, is there a standard or a preferred reading of ambiguous or incomplete words and phrases that are left for the reader to decide?

Thanks for your help!
-J
Hiya, the dashes are challenging, thanks for asking. What happened here is that the word damned was censored out of the text so as to no longer be offensive but still be recognised by the reader. There are several ways to read it.

You could just say d-dash-d. It is closest to the original text but least elegant, in my opinion. Some readers say "dashed". Some just say damned. I personally try to say something like darned, like when you want to say damned very badly but there are kids around.

You can choose which feels most comfortable for you and which seems best fitted with the surrounding text. Does that make sense? Thank you!
Carolin

Please help us finish The Theory and Practice of Brewing and learn about beer!

deongines
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Post by deongines » November 26th, 2018, 10:33 am

Turning it over in your mind will not plow the field.

deongines
Posts: 1319
Joined: November 2nd, 2012, 4:14 pm
Location: Salt Lake City UT

Post by deongines » November 26th, 2018, 10:38 am

Can I claim sections 30 and 31? Thanks, Deon
Turning it over in your mind will not plow the field.

Carolin
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Post by Carolin » November 26th, 2018, 11:47 pm

Thank you deon!
Carolin

Please help us finish The Theory and Practice of Brewing and learn about beer!


DaveWindell
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Post by DaveWindell » November 30th, 2018, 12:04 am

Dear Carolin,
Please can I claim sections 52 and 53?

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