COMPLETE: LibriVox 13th Anniversary - tg

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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ColleenMc
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Post by ColleenMc » June 24th, 2018, 7:41 am

All of these are quirky little articles, most just one paragraph, all have 13 in headline and all published in New York Times in 1913. I am not sure how cataloging works, but my original thought was that these could just be combined as "New York Times Articles from 1913" and cataloged that way? -- none are bylined so there is no author to list on any of them.

Here are links to the articles:

https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1913/09/06/100573601.pdf

https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1913/10/17/100653814.pdf

https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1913/06/14/100399590.pdf (actually this one is a letter to the editor so would potentially have an author to catalog)

https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1913/01/14/100246996.pdf

https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1913/01/12/100604556.pdf


If it's all too much trouble, no worries. I can pick something from the list. These stories just tickled me -- especially the Belgian who gave the same speech for 13 years before anyone noticed!

Colleen

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 10:16 am

ColleenMc wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 7:41 am
All of these are quirky little articles, most just one paragraph, all have 13 in headline and all published in New York Times in 1913. I am not sure how cataloging works, but my original thought was that these could just be combined as "New York Times Articles from 1913" and cataloged that way? -- none are bylined so there is no author to list on any of them.

If it's all too much trouble, no worries. I can pick something from the list. These stories just tickled me -- especially the Belgian who gave the same speech for 13 years before anyone noticed!

Colleen
Hi again, Colleen, Thanks for sending up the sources you were thinking about using. That helps me a lot. :)

First of all, I'll say that rummaging through old issues of the NYTimes can be a lot of fun, if one is so inclined--more about that later...

Secondly, I think we have to be careful about the way we cite articles from the NYTimes, even though they are pre-1923. The NYTimesMachine (your source) has a "Copyright" symbol prominently displayed. If you find something which intrigues you, then to be safe I think we need to go back and find the article in the actual NYTimes archive and cite it from there. This, admittedly can be time consuming, and the articles are not always easy to find, paging through what is essentially microfilm, but it's the safe way.

Since I subscribe to the NYTimes, I have access to the archives without charge, and this morning I tried to find the articles you mention. A couple I couldn't find. Two of them, however, are actually highlighted on the archive pages, and are given short-URL's, meant to be shared.

I would suggest that you read these two articles for the 13th Anniversary Collection. They are:

Same Speech for 13 Years: https://nyti.ms/2KeeNDi

Immigration Officials Marry 13 Couples: https://nyti.ms/2MRi0Kx

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Now for my rummaging "fun": Rummage #1 While searching for one of your articles in the Saturday, June 14, 1913 edition of the NYTimes I came across an article on page 11 entitled "Defies the 13 HooDoo: American Line Captain Takes His Ship to Sea Without Fear."
https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1913/06/14/issue.html. This snippet would make a great read for the 13th collection. If you would like to read this, it's yours; if not, I'll post it under suggestions.

Rummage #2. [This is just for fun, my style!] :wink: There was also an article on that same page 11 of the June 14, 1913 NYT, which would make a perfect read for the 14th Anniversary Collection, if there ever were to be one, which is, however, unlikely. This article is entitled "14 Millionaires Saved." It concerns 14 millionaires "representing some of the largest railroad and car building interests in the United States" who were stranded in a yacht belonging to one of them when it ran into trouble in the shoals off Atlantic City. The barons of commerce were saved by two lifeguards, who rowed out to the "palatial steam launch." "Drenched to the skin and supremely wretched, the millionaires huddled together in the none too roomy lifeboat, while [the lifeguards] tugged at the oars to bring them safely from the yacht to the breaker line and through the danger zone to the shore."

ColleenMc
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Post by ColleenMc » June 24th, 2018, 11:12 am

Hi Sue,

I actually do have the New York Times subscription myself, but before I did, I would go to the "spiderbytes" archive for free articles, and then to view those articles would have to click on the PDF rather than the "TimesMachine" display (from which you can ultimately get to the PDF for ease of reading anyway) -- so I included the PDF links so that you or anyone checking out the stories would be able to access them, because you can definitely view the PDFs without having the subscription.

On the copyright front: I thought the rule was prior to 1922, it's public domain no matter what (even if there's a NYT circle-c on it, is that actually valid?)

That hoodoo 13 story took a while to find because you can't find it by searching the headline even within that day's issue! It was grouped with another article just above it and only the above one is indexed. What a pain. I would love to include that one with the other two you suggest, as the "assortment" we talked about above. I will do as 3 separate recordings so they can be cataloged appropriately. Can I give them a title that shows the 3 are part of a set/series, like "New York Times articles from 1913 that include the number 13, Number 1: "Immigration Officials Get 13 Couples Married at One Time" " -- with the next two changing the number and headline accordingly.

So to sum up, I'd like to do the three quick bits you suggest above (13 marriages, same speech 13 years, sea captain 13 hoodoo) as my contribution to this year's collection. Once we get the title format nailed down, I'll get those recorded and turned in ASAP.

Also, while trying to find the 13 hoodoo article, I found this one, whose first paragraph made my mouth drop open: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1915/08/24/100174814.html?pageNumber=8

I mean, DAMN, not only insanely offensive but so casual about it! Even knowing it was from 1915 I still was shocked by it. Obviously I'm NOT suggesting that one for the collection.

Also, this one I stumbled over was outside of the 1913 theme I was going for, but I'd like to put it out there for the list of suggestions, that someone else might want to do -- it's a longer feature article from 1896 that would stand on its own: "Is Thirteen Unlucky?" The subheadlines gives a good sense of what the article is about: "The Opinions of Railroad Men, Police, and Fire Fighters. SOLACE FOR THE SUPERSTITIOUS In the Experience of Men of Affairs, Thirteen Seems About as Good as Any Other Number."

Here's the permalink to that one: https://nyti.ms/2lxyRpr

Thanks for your patience with this! I do love digging thru the New York Times (and other newspapers online -- I'm asking for a newspapers.com subscription for my birthday in a couple of months so I can expand my digging!).

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 11:44 am

ColleenMc wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 11:12 am
I will do as 3 separate recordings so they can be cataloged appropriately. Can I give them a title that shows the 3 are part of a set/series, like "New York Times articles from 1913 that include the number 13, Number 1: "Immigration Officials Get 13 Couples Married at One Time" " -- with the next two changing the number and headline accordingly.

So to sum up, I'd like to do the three quick bits you suggest above (13 marriages, same speech 13 years, sea captain 13 hoodoo) as my contribution to this year's collection. Once we get the title format nailed down, I'll get those recorded and turned in ASAP.
Ok, Colleen, We've got a go. Yes, the 3 articles can have a general title; let's go this way:
New York Times, 1913, No. 1: Immigration Officians Get 13 Couples Married
etc.
ColleenMc wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 11:12 am
Also, while trying to find the 13 hoodoo article, I found this one, whose first paragraph made my mouth drop open.
Without question, reading for LibriVox, opens your eyes ..
ColleenMc wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 11:12 am
Also, this one I stumbled over was outside of the 1913 theme I was going for, but I'd like to put it out there for the list of suggestions, that someone else might want to do -- it's a longer feature article from 1896 that would stand on its own: "Is Thirteen Unlucky?" The subheadlines gives a good sense of what the article is about: "The Opinions of Railroad Men, Police, and Fire Fighters. SOLACE FOR THE SUPERSTITIOUS In the Experience of Men of Affairs, Thirteen Seems About as Good as Any Other Number."

Here's the permalink to that one: https://nyti.ms/2lxyRpr
Thanks for this great suggestion!
ColleenMc wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 11:12 am
On the copyright front: I thought the rule was prior to 1922, it's public domain no matter what (even if there's a NYT circle-c on it, is that actually valid?)
I'm no lawyer, but I interpret those edited selections from the NYT as a "repackaging" of the material and therefore being claimed by the NYT as copyrighted, kind of like when a drug company repackages an old drug in a "long acting" or other new formula and then patents it. Better safe than sorry when treading on copyright.

Regards,

commonsparrow3
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Post by commonsparrow3 » June 24th, 2018, 12:53 pm

I've just been reading these last few posts with interest! I love old newspapers! This set of "13" articles from the NY Times sounds like something very enjoyable. Unfortunately, I can't seem to access the linked articles to see them, as I get a pop-up informing me that I must be a NY Times subscriber in order to do that.

My favorite source for old newspapers (which requires no subscription) is the Library of Congress "Chronicling America" collection of old newspapers. Here's a link to the site: Library of Congress: Chronicling America There are a wide assortment of newspapers from the colonial era to the 20th century. Unfortunately, the New York Times is not included, but there's a lot of interesting material there. I love to just check out whatever random things are featured in the "100 years ago today" selection on their home page.

Their "About" page includes the following PD notice:
The Library of Congress believes that the newspapers in Chronicling America are in the public domain or have no known copyright restrictions. Newspapers published in the United States prior to 1923 are in the public domain in their entirety. Any newspapers in Chronicling America that were published after 1922 are also believed to be in the public domain, but may contain some copyrighted third party materials.
So it looks like we're free to use any of this site's newspaper content from 1922 or earlier, but must be aware that anything later than that is in more of a gray area.

I used this site as a source for three days of old San Francisco newspapers for a solo project The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire as Reported in the Newspapers of that City

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » June 24th, 2018, 1:00 pm

Hello Sue,

I saw a notice of your project in Rapunzelina's signature, and I thought it was a cool idea!

I hope this is okay, but I thought it might be nice to add some poems to the list at beginning. Readers are already spoiled for choice, but maybe, just maybe, a few more wouldn't hurt. I found a few goodies, and they're listed below.

Thirteen Years of Service by Anna Philley, pp. 42-43
https://archive.org/details/poems00phil

Eleanor When Thirteen Months Old by William Collins Reed, pp. 96-97
https://archive.org/details/poems00reed

The Thirteenth of April, 1829 by George Howard pp. 43-47
https://archive.org/details/poemsbygeorgehow00carlrich

Leo Thirteenth by William Gavin Hume
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=wu.89099760787;view=1up;seq=14

The Thirteenth Satire of Juvenal by John Quincy Adams, pp. 39-51
https://archive.org/details/religions00adam

To Alice on Her Thirteenth Birthday by Sarah Metcalf Phipps
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=osu.32435001689520;view=1up;seq=37

To a Child on Her Thirteenth Birthday by John Cave
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31175035235756;view=1up;seq=29

A Thirteenth Century Prayer by Bruce Malaher, p. 35
https://archive.org/details/wizardsloomother00mala

A Thirteenth-Century Parable by Helen Hunt Jackson, pp. 123-126
https://archive.org/details/poemsbyhelenjack00jack

Beginning of the Thirteenth Iliad by William Sidney Walker, pp. 203-206
https://archive.org/details/gustavusvasaothe00walkiala

Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity by Reginald Heber, pp. 124-125
https://archive.org/details/pohebe00hebe

Hymn for the Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity by Jedediah Huntington, pp. 210-211
https://archive.org/details/poems00hunt

Thirteenth Epode of Horace, Imitated by Josias Lyndon Arnold
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31822038205340;view=1up;seq=23


For my entry, could I please read 'A Thirteenth Century Prayer' by Bruce Malaher?
Erin

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 1:28 pm

commonsparrow3 wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 12:53 pm
I've just been reading these last few posts with interest! I love old newspapers! This set of "13" articles from the NY Times sounds like something very enjoyable. Unfortunately, I can't seem to access the linked articles to see them, as I get a pop-up informing me that I must be a NY Times subscriber in order to do that.

My favorite source for old newspapers (which requires no subscription) is the Library of Congress "Chronicling America" collection of old newspapers. Here's a link to the site: Library of Congress: Chronicling America There are a wide assortment of newspapers from the colonial era to the 20th century. Unfortunately, the New York Times is not included, but there's a lot of interesting material there. I love to just check out whatever random things are featured in the "100 years ago today" selection on their home page.

Their "About" page includes the following PD notice:
The Library of Congress believes that the newspapers in Chronicling America are in the public domain or have no known copyright restrictions. Newspapers published in the United States prior to 1923 are in the public domain in their entirety. Any newspapers in Chronicling America that were published after 1922 are also believed to be in the public domain, but may contain some copyrighted third party materials.
So it looks like we're free to use any of this site's newspaper content from 1922 or earlier, but must be aware that anything later than that is in more of a gray area.

I used this site as a source for three days of old San Francisco newspapers for a solo project The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire as Reported in the Newspapers of that City
Hi Maria, Thanks for mentioning the Chronicling America Series! :) I have used it in the past myself. It is an excellent source for newspapers.

What links didn't work for you? These two https://nyti.ms/2KeeNDi and https://nyti.ms/2KeeNDi should work for anybody. They are permalinks, provided by the Times. Let me know.

By the way, folks, if you're looking for a fun Sunday project, jump over to Maria's 113th anniversary song fest! :birthday: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=70678! :)
Maria, I have to tell you that ever since I recorded my bit of song, the tune has been going
and going around in my head: (I think they call it an "ear worm" (ooooh....) It's a catchy tune!

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3690
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 1:28 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 1:28 pm
commonsparrow3 wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 12:53 pm
I've just been reading these last few posts with interest! I love old newspapers! This set of "13" articles from the NY Times sounds like something very enjoyable. Unfortunately, I can't seem to access the linked articles to see them, as I get a pop-up informing me that I must be a NY Times subscriber in order to do that.

My favorite source for old newspapers (which requires no subscription) is the Library of Congress "Chronicling America" collection of old newspapers. Here's a link to the site: Library of Congress: Chronicling America There are a wide assortment of newspapers from the colonial era to the 20th century. Unfortunately, the New York Times is not included, but there's a lot of interesting material there. I love to just check out whatever random things are featured in the "100 years ago today" selection on their home page.

Their "About" page includes the following PD notice:
The Library of Congress believes that the newspapers in Chronicling America are in the public domain or have no known copyright restrictions. Newspapers published in the United States prior to 1923 are in the public domain in their entirety. Any newspapers in Chronicling America that were published after 1922 are also believed to be in the public domain, but may contain some copyrighted third party materials.
So it looks like we're free to use any of this site's newspaper content from 1922 or earlier, but must be aware that anything later than that is in more of a gray area.

I used this site as a source for three days of old San Francisco newspapers for a solo project The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire as Reported in the Newspapers of that City
Hi Maria, Thanks for mentioning the Chronicling America Series! :) I have used it in the past myself. It is an excellent source for newspapers.

What links didn't work for you? These two https://nyti.ms/2KeeNDi and https://nyti.ms/2KeeNDi should work for anybody. They are permalinks, provided by the Times. Let me know.

By the way, folks, if you're looking for a fun Sunday project, jump over to Maria's 13th anniversary song fest! :birthday: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=70678! :)
Maria, I have to tell you that ever since I recorded my bit of song, the tune has been going
and going around in my head: (I think they call it an "ear worm" (ooooh....) It's a catchy tune!
Last edited by Sue Anderson on June 24th, 2018, 1:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 1:30 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 1:28 pm
commonsparrow3 wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 12:53 pm
I've just been reading these last few posts with interest! I love old newspapers! This set of "13" articles from the NY Times sounds like something very enjoyable. Unfortunately, I can't seem to access the linked articles to see them, as I get a pop-up informing me that I must be a NY Times subscriber in order to do that.

My favorite source for old newspapers (which requires no subscription) is the Library of Congress "Chronicling America" collection of old newspapers. Here's a link to the site: Library of Congress: Chronicling America There are a wide assortment of newspapers from the colonial era to the 20th century. Unfortunately, the New York Times is not included, but there's a lot of interesting material there. I love to just check out whatever random things are featured in the "100 years ago today" selection on their home page.

Their "About" page includes the following PD notice:
The Library of Congress believes that the newspapers in Chronicling America are in the public domain or have no known copyright restrictions. Newspapers published in the United States prior to 1923 are in the public domain in their entirety. Any newspapers in Chronicling America that were published after 1922 are also believed to be in the public domain, but may contain some copyrighted third party materials.
So it looks like we're free to use any of this site's newspaper content from 1922 or earlier, but must be aware that anything later than that is in more of a gray area.

I used this site as a source for three days of old San Francisco newspapers for a solo project The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire as Reported in the Newspapers of that City
Hi Maria, Thanks for mentioning the Chronicling America Series! :) I have used it in the past myself. It is an excellent source for newspapers.

What links didn't work for you? These two https://nyti.ms/2KeeNDi and https://nyti.ms/2KeeNDi should work for anybody. They are permalinks, provided by the Times. Let me know.

By the way, folks, if you're looking for a fun Sunday project, jump over to Maria's 13th anniversary song fest! :birthday: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=70678! :)
Maria, I have to tell you that ever since I recorded my bit of song, the tune has been going
and going around in my head: (I think they call it an "ear worm" (ooooh....) It's a catchy tune!

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3690
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 1:32 pm

Oops! Well, Maria you've got a double advertisement, with my duplicated post! :oops:

Edit: Or is it a triple? I still find this new format for the forum confusing. :mrgreen:

Sue Anderson
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Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 1:53 pm

Newgatenovelist wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 1:00 pm
Hello Sue,

I saw a notice of your project in Rapunzelina's signature, and I thought it was a cool idea!

I hope this is okay, but I thought it might be nice to add some poems to the list at beginning. Readers are already spoiled for choice, but maybe, just maybe, a few more wouldn't hurt. I found a few goodies, and they're listed below.


For my entry, could I please read 'A Thirteenth Century Prayer' by Bruce Malaher?
Erin
Hi Erin, Many thanks for the poems! :) You're quite right, we need poems. I'll have them up in the suggestion area in a jiffy.

Newgatenovelist
Posts: 2788
Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » June 24th, 2018, 2:04 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 1:53 pm
Hi Erin, Many thanks for the poems! :) You're quite right, we need poems. I'll have them up in the suggestion area in a jiffy.
Hurray! This collection is already shaping up to be intriguingly eclectic.

I'm going to ask a stupid question - how are sections counted or numbered? Would it be okay to read more than one poem?
Erin

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 2:10 pm

Newgatenovelist wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 2:04 pm
Sue Anderson wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 1:53 pm
Hi Erin, Many thanks for the poems! :) You're quite right, we need poems. I'll have them up in the suggestion area in a jiffy.
Hurray! This collection is already shaping up to be intriguingly eclectic.

I'm going to ask a stupid question - how are sections counted or numbered? Would it be okay to read more than one poem?
Erin
Hi Erin, We seem to be doing triplets lately! (including my posts, oweee :lol: ) Poems are short. Sure, you can read up to three! :)

Newgatenovelist
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Joined: February 17th, 2015, 7:22 am

Post by Newgatenovelist » June 24th, 2018, 2:33 pm

Woo hoo! I'm glad I checked. I think I will be greedy and claim a couple of those ones I posted earlier! I'll have a look and see which ones take my fancy. Thanks!

Sue Anderson
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Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2018, 6:20 pm

Newgatenovelist wrote:
June 24th, 2018, 2:33 pm
Woo hoo! I'm glad I checked. I think I will be greedy and claim a couple of those ones I posted earlier! I'll have a look and see which ones take my fancy. Thanks!
I took a look at your first poem, "A Thirteenth Century Prayer." The poet, Bruce Malaher, is not yet in the LibriVox catalog, so we'll be adding him, which is nice, As I turned the pages of his book, (metaphorically), on Archive.org, I came across this preface: "The Author, being on Active Service in Mesopotamia, has been unable personally to correct or revise this Volume." Such was the fate of poets in 1916. Malaher was also a medical doctor.

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