COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 058 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Sue Anderson
Posts: 3276
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » June 30th, 2018, 6:56 pm

Availle wrote:
June 30th, 2018, 5:26 pm
Here is my contribution:
The Laws of Shōtoku Taishi
by Shōtoku Taishi (574 - 622) (last name is Shotoku)
Hi Availle,
Thank you for presenting this document from Japanese history. According to what I gleaned from an article about Taishi Shōtoku in the Encyclopedia Britannica, "Shōtoku compiled the chronicles of the government, after the Chinese model, to make up the first book of Japanese history... His “Seventeen Article Constitution” instructed the Japanese ruling class in Confucian ethical concepts and the Chinese bureaucratic system, which he held up as an ideal for Japanese government." https://www.britannica.com/biography/Taishi-Shotoku

It seems to me the the 17 articles contain quite a few nuggets of common sense. I was particularly drawn to number IV:

"Politeness must be the chief rule of conduct for all officers and their colleagues in the court. The first principle governing subjects must be politeness. When superiors are not polite then inferiors will not keep in the right; when inferiors are not polite their conduct degenerates into crime. When both prince and subjects are polite, then social order is never disturbed and the state is kept in a condition of tranquility."

Availle
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 15456
Joined: August 1st, 2009, 11:30 pm
Contact:

Post by Availle » June 30th, 2018, 7:37 pm

This must be the reason why the Japanese are the most polite people in the world. :D
Cheers,
Ava.

--
AvailleAudio.com

Inspired by LibriVox: The 8 Views of Lake Biwa

knotyouraveragejo
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 14964
Joined: November 18th, 2006, 4:37 pm
Location: Pennsylvania

Post by knotyouraveragejo » June 30th, 2018, 7:55 pm

Ha! I had the exact same thought.
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

soupy
Posts: 2395
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » July 1st, 2018, 4:32 am

The Laws of Shōtoku Taishi seem to be sensible and are PLOK :thumbs:

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

knotyouraveragejo
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 14964
Joined: November 18th, 2006, 4:37 pm
Location: Pennsylvania

Post by knotyouraveragejo » July 1st, 2018, 4:21 pm

I have been reading a number of articles in Birds and Nature about gemstones which mention that they often come from Ceylon. So when I came across this article, I couldn't resist reading (and of course recording) a little more about it! :)

Ceylon: The Island of Jewels by Leopold Claremont.

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf058_ceylonjewels_claremont_jms_128kb.mp3
12:08

text link from Knowledge, 1912, p. 2
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/nyp.33433110147232?urlappend=%3Bseq=16

I haven't found much about the author yet, other than that he is also the author of the book, The Gem Cutter's Craft. Still looking...
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

soupy
Posts: 2395
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » July 1st, 2018, 6:01 pm

Thanks for an interested look at Ceylon and the gem industry of the Moors Jo.
One error noted 7:14 some stutter or something p. 5 found to occur on the slopes and banks of rivers and streams


This is from https://ceylongemhub.com/famous-gems-from-srilanka
The blue bella of Asia is a 400 ct highly desirable corn flower Blue sapphire said to have found in a paddy field Rathnapura in 1926. The word "belle" refers to the extraordinary beauty of this enormous blue sapphire owned by Lord Naffield of Britain. This blue bella reappeared in Geneva Switzerland at Christie's Auction. The stone has been recut and had weight of 395.52 Carats mounted to a diamond necklace. The stone has sold for $17.29 Million highest price ever for a sapphire at an action in 2014.


Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3276
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » July 1st, 2018, 6:28 pm

knotyouraveragejo wrote:
July 1st, 2018, 4:21 pm
I have been reading a number of articles in Birds and Nature about gemstones which mention that they often come from Ceylon. So when I came across this article, I couldn't resist reading (and of course recording) a little more about it! :)

Ceylon: The Island of Jewels by Leopold Claremont.
Hi Jo, Many thanks for contributing to vol. 058 with this description of mining and cutting jewel stones in Ceylon. Fascinating pictures in the article! :)
--------------

Craig and Jo: Craig, I listened to all of Jo's recording, and I didn't, myself, hear any problem at the place you mention, (7:14). So, I've marked it PL Ok.

knotyouraveragejo
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 14964
Joined: November 18th, 2006, 4:37 pm
Location: Pennsylvania

Post by knotyouraveragejo » July 1st, 2018, 8:27 pm

Thanks Craig and Sue for listening. I went back to check and I also can't hear anything odd about that sentence at 7:14. Maybe it was a glitch in the playback? :?
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

soupy
Posts: 2395
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » July 2nd, 2018, 5:10 am

Alright then. Thanks. My computer browser still closes while listening to readings. Maybe there is more wrong with my browser. I'll try using a different browser when listening.

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

DrPGould
Posts: 2797
Joined: December 12th, 2016, 9:27 pm

Post by DrPGould » July 6th, 2018, 6:24 pm

Hello, Sue.

I have a short work which straddles the divide between fiction and non-fiction. It is called the Story of Sinuhe.
The translation I have is from 1916 and is in Hathi Trust. It is an ancient Egyptian tale...some of which appears to be verifiable, other parts of which appear to be mythological...but nonetheless it was an influential text in 11-12th Dynasty Middle Kingdom Egypt.

The translation is located here:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=njp.32101038152078;view=1up;seq=184

If it doesn't fit here, I can always put it in the short story collection. Just thought I'd bring it here first.

Many thanks,

Philip
Back after 8/15. In the hands of the medicos.

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3276
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » July 6th, 2018, 7:34 pm

DrPGould wrote:
July 6th, 2018, 6:24 pm
Hello, Sue.

I have a short work which straddles the divide between fiction and non-fiction. It is called the Story of Sinuhe.
The translation I have is from 1916 and is in Hathi Trust. It is an ancient Egyptian tale...some of which appears to be verifiable, other parts of which appear to be mythological...but nonetheless it was an influential text in 11-12th Dynasty Middle Kingdom Egypt.

The translation is located here:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=njp.32101038152078;view=1up;seq=184

If it doesn't fit here, I can always put it in the short story collection. Just thought I'd bring it here first.

Many thanks,

Philip
Hi Philip,

A reading of The Story of Sinuhe would be most welcome here at the Nonfiction Collection.

The idea of "nonfiction" as I see it, and to the extent that LibriVox has a policy about what constitutes "nonfiction," is quite inclusive; myths, legends, and stories from the world's religions are all welcome here.

The Story of Sinuhe quite clearly falls within this inclusive umbrella. Quoting from the introductory material to which you kindly directed me:

"The form of the tale so closely resembles other autobiographies that have been found on the walls of tombs that it seems quite likely that its nucleus may be derived from the tomb of a real Sinuhe... Even in this case we should doubtless find that literary elaboration had greatly changed the expression and character of the original narrative, so that in its finished state the story could not claim to be more than "founded on fact."

We look forward to hearing the Story of Sinuhe.

Regards,

DrPGould
Posts: 2797
Joined: December 12th, 2016, 9:27 pm

Post by DrPGould » July 6th, 2018, 7:54 pm

Thanks, Sue. Just wanted to be sure. I'll get the text marked up and ready to read.

Philip
Back after 8/15. In the hands of the medicos.

pschempf
Posts: 1244
Joined: April 5th, 2013, 8:28 pm
Location: Coastal Alaska Rainforest
Contact:

Post by pschempf » July 7th, 2018, 10:31 am

Sue, Craig and Jo -

Here's another odd bit that may or may not fit in SNF -

Title: The Contented Man
Author: G. K. Chesterton (1874 – 1936)
Link from the uploader: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf058_contentedman_chesterton_ps_128kb.mp3
Link to the source: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2015/2015-h/2015-h.htm#link2H_4_0037
Length in minutes: 9:37
Fritz

"A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labors of a spasmodic Hercules."

Trollope

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3276
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » July 7th, 2018, 11:12 am

pschempf wrote:
July 7th, 2018, 10:31 am
Sue, Craig and Jo -

Here's another odd bit that may or may not fit in SNF -

Title: The Contented Man
Author: G. K. Chesterton (1874 – 1936)
Link from the uploader:
Hi Fritz, Wowie! That is quite some wordplay on Chesterton's part! Let me just say that the BC of snf058 is quite content that the content of this collection be so diverse and thus intellectually stimulating.

Thank you for your contribution! :)

soupy
Posts: 2395
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » July 7th, 2018, 4:12 pm

Thanks for the content from Chesterton. I have one question and that is the pronunciation of the word contentment. See the note on page one. Its fine if you disagree.

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Post Reply