COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 054 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Availle
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Post by Availle » December 13th, 2017, 6:52 am

Took a bit longer than expected, sorry... :oops:

But here it is, in all its glory of 49:20 (lots of ambulances going through town that night apparently):
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3

On gravitation and relativity; being the Halley lecture, delivered on June 12, 1920, by Ralph Sampson (1866 - 1939)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Allan_Sampson

https://archive.org/details/cu31924012340646

Thanks for your patience!
Cheers,
Ava.

--
AvailleAudio.com

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » December 13th, 2017, 9:30 am

Availle wrote:Took a bit longer than expected, sorry... :oops:

But here it is, in all its glory of 49:20 (lots of ambulances going through town that night apparently):

On gravitation and relativity; being the Halley lecture, delivered on June 12, 1920, by Ralph Sampson (1866 - 1939)

Thanks for your patience!
Glad to have your contribution to volume 54! :) Thanks, Availle!

soupy
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Post by soupy » December 13th, 2017, 1:08 pm

Thanks for reading this piece on the philosophy of science Availle. You did a great job reading it.

PLOK :thumbs:

I liked these quotes.

But this is not the only paradox which Einstein's theory carries, and, be it not forgotten, carries to success. The foregoing relates to its process. Its physical basis is the deduction, or generalization, or speculation, from the Michelson-Morley experiment — that each separate observer possesses his own peculiar notions and standards of space and time, which are incapable of telling him whether he is himself in motion, and which are not communicable to another so as to permit adjustment, except indeed as so far as the velocity of light appears to each under all circumstances the same.

Einstein has proved the irrelevance of this and all kindred theories and cautions by showing that, given the fundamental constant, all known features of gravitation may be foreseen exactly and calculated numerically from a coherent formula which asks for no mechanical model or diagram, no datum line in time or space, and no distinction in kind between them. His theory breaks through the 'dome of many coloured glass' with which Time 'stains the white radiance of eternity' But, we do not arrive at a perfectly white radiance. Something must remain to give us numerical results.

We have reached Kant's Ding an sich.

Einstein's work appears to me to show that it may be involved in the recesses of the nature of things in depths where our senses can never follow it. May he, not Is.

Mathematics no less than other aids to thought lives in a world where actuality is bartered for convenience. We must recognize the risk we take if we follow it; it may carry us farther than we are entitled to go. As time extends knowledge, it extends equally the unknown. We must be content to read the new page, as we read the old, with our finger-tips, like a blind man, not knowing what comes next.

Craig

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Post by Sue Anderson » December 22nd, 2017, 3:03 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3
10:42

The House Centipede
1914, 1930
https://archive.org/stream/CAT31127712/ ... 0/mode/1up


Charles Lester Marlatt (1863-1954) (C.L. Marlatt), U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Lester_Marlatt
According to Wikipedia, Marlatt introduced the ladybug into the USA (in an attempt to control a scale insect found in California)!

In the section on "Early Stages" I have left out the sentence "Its characteristics are indicated in figure 2." I also modified the next following sentence to leave out the reference to figure 2. And, in the section "Remedies," I have left off the last sentence (referencing pyrethrum) because this old (1914, 1930) description of the centipede would not reflect current pest control practices.

soupy
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Post by soupy » December 22nd, 2017, 3:51 pm

The House Centipede is PLOK :thumbs:

Thanks Sue and Merry Christmas :D

Craig

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Post by Sue Anderson » December 22nd, 2017, 5:58 pm

soupy wrote:The House Centipede is PLOK :thumbs:

Thanks Sue and Merry Christmas :D

Craig
Thanks for the PLing, Craig! :) Merry Christmas to you also, and holiday greetings to all!

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » December 23rd, 2017, 10:21 am

Sue Anderson wrote:https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3
10:42
In the section "Remedies," I have left off the last sentence (referencing pyrethrum) because this old (1914, 1930) description of the centipede would not reflect current pest control practices.
Hi Sue. I think we all recognize that advice or common practices from 100 years ago generally don't reflect modern practices, but LV policy is to read the text as written.
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » December 23rd, 2017, 3:21 pm

knotyouraveragejo wrote:
Sue Anderson wrote:https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3
10:42
In the section "Remedies," I have left off the last sentence (referencing pyrethrum) because this old (1914, 1930) description of the centipede would not reflect current pest control practices.
Hi Sue. I think we all recognize that advice or common practices from 100 years ago generally don't reflect modern practices, but LV policy is to read the text as written.
ok.

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » December 26th, 2017, 12:41 pm

Here's one from me

The Queen of Egyptology
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3
33:10

A tribute to Amelia B. Edwards upon her death in 1892 by William Copley Winslow.

text link
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/wu.89097318 ... d=%3Bseq=5
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » December 26th, 2017, 1:07 pm

knotyouraveragejo wrote:Here's one from me

The Queen of Egyptology
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3
33:10

A tribute to Amelia B. Edwards upon her death in 1892 by William Copley Winslow.
Jo, Thank you for this contribution to vol. 54! :) Could you please give us the source from which you read?

Thank you,

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » December 26th, 2017, 2:12 pm

Edited my post above to add it. Sorry for the oversight!
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

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Post by Sue Anderson » December 26th, 2017, 2:51 pm

Thank you, Jo.

soupy
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Post by soupy » December 27th, 2017, 7:52 pm

The Queen of Egyptology is PLOK :thumbs:

Thanks Jo :D

It's nice to read of female explorers and scientists.

Craig

I likes these sentences for some reason.

She splendidly illustrated what it is to see and think through the eye rather than through pure reason.

'"Lord Brackenbury," so full of life, light, color, and abounding in suggestions to the imagination and eye, typifies, I think, the objective novel as distinctively as "Middlemarch" represents the subjective novel of our day.

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » December 27th, 2017, 8:25 pm

Thanks Craig.
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

HeartsandStars
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Post by HeartsandStars » January 2nd, 2018, 9:04 pm

Hi Sue, I've got a couple for the collection.

The Popular Nickelodeon by Frederick J. Haskin, from the January 18, 1908 issue of Moving Picture World. Run time 12:55

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3

https://archive.org/stream/movingpictur ... 6/mode/2up

Buster Keaton--Hard Knocks Make a Man by Spencer Russell, from July 1922 Filmplay magazine. Run time 6:19

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyourav ... _128kb.mp3

https://archive.org/stream/FilmplayJuly ... 3/mode/2up

Thanks!
Andrea

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