COMPLETE: An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, by Hume

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Caeristhiona
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Post by Caeristhiona » March 30th, 2007, 10:30 am

Thank you, D.E.! And Superman David. :D
In my experience, nothing ruins a party like someone suddenly speaking Latin in reverse.
-- Jeffrey Rowland

CarlManchester
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Post by CarlManchester » April 1st, 2007, 11:05 am

http://www.carlmanchester.net/Hume/humanunderstanding_01_hume.mp3

Please wait approx 10 mins from time of post.
American Psychology 1922-1947. It's the nearest thing to American Psycho that we are allowed to record.

CarlManchester
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Post by CarlManchester » April 13th, 2007, 2:23 pm

http://www.carlmanchester.net/Hume/humanunderstanding_04_hume.mp3

Please wait approx 10 mins from time of this post as well.
American Psychology 1922-1947. It's the nearest thing to American Psycho that we are allowed to record.

lukkystarr
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Post by lukkystarr » April 13th, 2007, 3:08 pm

This will be my first recording, but it's short. :) If it goes well I'll take more.

LeonMire
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Post by LeonMire » April 14th, 2007, 4:16 am

I'd like to do section 15.

Gesine
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Post by Gesine » April 14th, 2007, 7:17 am

CarlManchester wrote:http://www.carlmanchester.net/Hume/humanunderstanding_04_hume.mp3

Please wait approx 10 mins from time of this post as well.
Thanks Carl, have updated the list.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Gesine
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Post by Gesine » April 14th, 2007, 7:20 am

lukkystarr wrote:This will be my first recording, but it's short. :) If it goes well I'll take more.
Welcome to LibriVox! I've signed you up for 14.

Please let me know under which name or pseudonym you'd like to appear in the LibriVox catalogue. We can also link to a personal web site/blog.

Also, if this is your first recording, you may want to send a sample recording of a minute or so, to make sure the sound quality etc is all right - often things can be improved at the outset that are difficult to fix later.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Gesine
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Post by Gesine » April 14th, 2007, 7:21 am

LeonMire wrote:I'd like to do section 15.
Thanks, I've added you to the reader list.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

LeonMire
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Post by LeonMire » April 14th, 2007, 3:43 pm

My section includes a part where Hume quotes Tacitus in the original Latin: "Utrumque, qui interfuere, nunc quoque memorant, postquam nullum mendacio pretium" But I don't know how to pronounce most of these words, even though I tried to look them up online. I was successful in finding out the pronunciation of some of these words (such as utrumque), but most of the rest would be guesswork. Is there a place on the internet that helps with pronunciation of uncommon foreign words? I found a few places that give general tips, but nothing more. Do you want me to pronounce them as they look like to me? Alternatively, I could read the phrase in English translation. I looked up the relevant section in Tacitus's Histories (Book 4, section 81), and I'm pretty sure it translates as "Those who were present still attest both miracles to-day, when there is nothing to gain by lying." There are probably lots of other places where Hume quotes in Latin and Greek. So what do you think?

Starlite
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Post by Starlite » April 14th, 2007, 3:46 pm

Leon, post in the help wanted section of the forum. Make a new post and ask for Latin Help. Some friendly volunteer will make a recording for you if you ask real nice. :D

Esther
"Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable
people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress,
therefore, depends on unreasonable people." George Bernard Shaw

LeonMire
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Post by LeonMire » April 14th, 2007, 9:07 pm

How would you like us to read the footnotes? Are you supposed to read all of the footnotes, even if it's just Hume citing his sources? What if Hume adds a small comment? Are you still required to read it? For instance, I've got one that says, "Hist. lib. iv. cap. 81. Suetonius gives nearly the same account in vita Vesp." I'm not really sure how to read that first part anyway. And what if the footnote is really really long, so long that it would badly interrupt the train of his thought if inserted in the middle of the text? Is it okay to read that one at the end of the chapter? I've got a footnote that's 1200 words, right in the middle of a thought. And if I can put it at the end of the chapter, should I preface it with something to remind the listener what it was a footnote to? Like say, "Footnote 24 follows the text" and then read the sentence in which it was footnoted?

Gesine
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Post by Gesine » April 15th, 2007, 12:55 am

LeonMire wrote:How would you like us to read the footnotes? Are you supposed to read all of the footnotes, even if it's just Hume citing his sources? What if Hume adds a small comment? Are you still required to read it? For instance, I've got one that says, "Hist. lib. iv. cap. 81. Suetonius gives nearly the same account in vita Vesp." I'm not really sure how to read that first part anyway. And what if the footnote is really really long, so long that it would badly interrupt the train of his thought if inserted in the middle of the text? Is it okay to read that one at the end of the chapter? I've got a footnote that's 1200 words, right in the middle of a thought. And if I can put it at the end of the chapter, should I preface it with something to remind the listener what it was a footnote to? Like say, "Footnote 24 follows the text" and then read the sentence in which it was footnoted?
LeonMire, this really is a question for Caet - she'll be back tomorrow. I'll PM her to make sure she replies to you then, all right?
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Caeristhiona
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Post by Caeristhiona » April 16th, 2007, 7:50 pm

LeonMire wrote:How would you like us to read the footnotes? Are you supposed to read all of the footnotes, even if it's just Hume citing his sources? What if Hume adds a small comment? Are you still required to read it? For instance, I've got one that says, "Hist. lib. iv. cap. 81. Suetonius gives nearly the same account in vita Vesp." I'm not really sure how to read that first part anyway. And what if the footnote is really really long, so long that it would badly interrupt the train of his thought if inserted in the middle of the text? Is it okay to read that one at the end of the chapter? I've got a footnote that's 1200 words, right in the middle of a thought. And if I can put it at the end of the chapter, should I preface it with something to remind the listener what it was a footnote to? Like say, "Footnote 24 follows the text" and then read the sentence in which it was footnoted?
Phew! Alright, let me tackle this one by one.

1) If the footnote is a citation, you need not read it. The listener doesn't need to know where he cites his sources -- they can always look it up.

2) If the footnote is very long, I would prefer you read it at the end of the paragraph it comes in, since it's probably relevant to the current thought. Or if his line of argument continues for several paragraphs, just wait till the line of argument is finished until you read it. Hmm...I guess I don't feel very strongly about this, hehe. If the footnote definitely belongs in the train of argument then work it in right there; if it's unrelated then certainly leave it till the end of the chapter.
In my experience, nothing ruins a party like someone suddenly speaking Latin in reverse.
-- Jeffrey Rowland

LeonMire
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Post by LeonMire » April 20th, 2007, 9:10 pm

Here is the link for section 15:
http://www.mediafire.com/?3y2jewnmmwa

I don't know if the sound quality is up to Librivox's standards. There's some fuzz in the background when you listen to it with headphones, but I don't know any way to get rid of it.

Also, I would like any constructive criticism on editing. This is my first relatively long project, involving extensive editing, and I don't think I did very well. There are several editing "seams," where you can tell that it wasn't recorded all at once because my voice sounds noticeably different or the background noise has changed, (my fridge turns on occasionally, and I live in a dorm, so I can't relocate). No matter how hard I try, I can't get my voice to sound quite the same as it did 10 minutes ago, even if I make sure that I'm in the exact same position. And since I don't even notice when the fridge is on, it'd be really inconvenient for me to sit around and wait till it turns off. It sounded just fine in Audacity, but when I listened with my headphones, the seams were more obvious. So any help I could get would be.. very.... well, helpful.

Caeristhiona
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Post by Caeristhiona » April 21st, 2007, 11:49 pm

Leon -

Initially, the sound is fine to me. Our standards are not that high. ;) But seriously, the background noise is not very noticeable, and the editing seams will be fixed for the most part in cataloging.

If you really feel you want to edit it, try posting a link to the file in "Listeners Wanted" asking for constructive criticism, or else post in "Help Wanted" asking for advice on how to fix it. But for our purposes here, I think it's fine. :)
In my experience, nothing ruins a party like someone suddenly speaking Latin in reverse.
-- Jeffrey Rowland

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