COMPLETE: Moll Flanders, by Daniel Defoe - AF/ge

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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chrissthegirl
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Post by chrissthegirl » April 29th, 2006, 3:50 pm

I'm not sure it's quite loud enough, but here's section 18 ->
http://download.yousendit.com/0FFD1D3607A83E7F

00:23:19 / 26.75MB
chriss the girl (no url)
chriss

DSayers
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Post by DSayers » April 30th, 2006, 5:58 pm

chrissthegirl wrote:I'm not sure it's quite loud enough, but here's section 18 ->
http://download.yousendit.com/0FFD1D3607A83E7F

00:23:19 / 26.75MB
chriss the girl (no url)
Thanks, Chriss. I'll give it a listen and let you know about any hiccoughs I notice. I think there are ways for LibriVox technicians to equalize volumes ... if I'm wrong, speak up out there!

I've started out your recording, and I can tell you right out that volume is spot on. Actually, I'm listening to it as I type, and you have a fine feel for MOLL. If you are open to advice, I'd say a more leisurely read gives listeners more time to process.

It is really cool if a single voice reads two chapters in a row (meaning, can you think of doing section 17 or section 19?

-Denny
[u][url=http://tinyurl.com/MyLVReadings][color=purple][size=84]Projects Completed & In Progress[/size][/color][/url][/u].

chrissthegirl
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Post by chrissthegirl » April 30th, 2006, 9:08 pm

Sure Denny! If I could have section 17 please, that'd be great. (As to speaking a bit slower, I'll try :) )
chriss

DSayers
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Post by DSayers » May 1st, 2006, 5:49 am

chrissthegirl wrote:(As to speaking a bit slower, I'll try :) )
Give it a try and see if it feels right ...

I especially enjoyed your voice characterizations where there was dialogue (Defoe doesn't have so much of that, using reported speech instead). Sections 17 and 18 have a lot of dialogue for you to show off with!

-Denny
[u][url=http://tinyurl.com/MyLVReadings][color=purple][size=84]Projects Completed & In Progress[/size][/color][/url][/u].

DSayers
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Post by DSayers » May 1st, 2006, 7:46 am

Empty
Last edited by DSayers on May 3rd, 2006, 6:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[u][url=http://tinyurl.com/MyLVReadings][color=purple][size=84]Projects Completed & In Progress[/size][/color][/url][/u].

ndoo
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Post by ndoo » May 3rd, 2006, 12:00 pm

Here's the link for section 12:
http://vo.nikolledoolin.com/audio/mollflanders_12_defoe.mp3

Size: 31.4 MB
Time: 0:34:20

Recorded by:
Nikolle Doolin
www.nikolledoolin.com

Best,
Nikolle

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Post by DSayers » May 6th, 2006, 10:26 pm

ndoo wrote:Here's the link for section 12:
http://vo.nikolledoolin.com/audio/mollflanders_12_defoe.mp3

Best,
Nikolle
My goodness, Nikolle, once again, what an excellent job of voice characterization. I proof-listened, and noticed no flaws. The repart?e between the sincere and honest lover and Moll, and later between the scam artist, his "sister" and Moll were exquistely rendered.

I would love to learn tips of how you edit so well. I see you edit out pauses between sentences, and it picks up the pace considerably. I always left them, thinking that it helped with listeners processing ... but this instantaneous pause between sentences seemed to work for you, and to add punch.

Any other tricks of the trade you'd care to share? I'd love to learn from a pro like you.

-Denny
[u][url=http://tinyurl.com/MyLVReadings][color=purple][size=84]Projects Completed & In Progress[/size][/color][/url][/u].

ndoo
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Post by ndoo » May 8th, 2006, 10:41 am

DSayers wrote: I would love to learn tips of how you edit so well. I see you edit out pauses between sentences, and it picks up the pace considerably. I always left them, thinking that it helped with listeners processing ... but this instantaneous pause between sentences seemed to work for you, and to add punch.

Any other tricks of the trade you'd care to share? I'd love to learn from a pro like you.

-Denny
Denny,

Thank you so much for the positive feedback; it?s very encouraging.

It?s hard to know where to begin regarding tips. It?s such a challenging question, as there are so many factors, which lead up to the final product. I suppose there is a fine line between reading too fast and reading too slow. For the long-winded narrations, maintaining a moderate pace is great overall, but try to avoid a start to finish monotone read. Varying the pace will make the story more interesting and convey the tone of the moment. If the dialogue is heated, pick up the pace. If the narrator is having a moment of profound introspection, slow down, and let us ?hear? the character thinking.

How you read will affect how the listener interprets the story, because they are getting cues from you. Of course, if it?s too fast (and thus too garbled) I?d say slow down to the point of comprehension, but not too slow. You neither want to be the tortoise, nor the hare, all the way through, but when the text directs you to go very slow, or very fast, you may want to let your read rise and fall in speed to give it depth and keep the reader engaged.

I approach editing as I would expect to hear it as a listener. I wouldn?t want to hear long, awkward pauses, because those take the audience out of the story (it can be jarring and you start thinking about gas prices, or whatnot). Your audience can only suspend their disbelief so much; don?t give them too much time to stop thinking about the story.

I have written, performed, and analyzed dialogue, so I bring that to the table, when I read. Lengthy pauses between dialogue either accentuate a moment of tension (for instance), or kill the momentum of the story. I cut out the voids between characters, which are unnecessary. I listen carefully and, if I realize I started drifting, or wondering if the file malfunctioned, then I know another listener will generally do the same. Just think of watching a play, and if a pause looks more like the actor forgot his next line than an intentional pregnant silence, or a transition in time, then cut it out. Also, I add silence in between narration or dialogue, which I left too little space between.

With Moll, I notice an overall steady pace, but it rises and falls like any normal thinking pattern. This is mostly what?s going on in her head and anyone would carefully explore thoughts, then suddenly dart around and jump from thinking to realizing a point. So, the pace of the read would reflect that. She's solemn and introspective at times and energetic at others. Just let your own understanding of the text come through in your reading; and, when editing, act like a critical listener. I think most people can follow the pace, as long as it isn't garbled. Also, I think it draws them deeper into the story, because of the reader's varied delivery. After all, if the dialogue is like a duel, you wouldn't want to see a swordsman thrust, the opponent just stand there for a few minutes, then deliver the parry, wait another few minutes, then riposte.

I hope that helps. Everyone has their own style and personal preference. At the end of the day, it's all in the ears of the listener.

ndoo
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Post by ndoo » May 17th, 2006, 11:40 am

Here?s Section 13:

File: http://vo.nikolledoolin.com/audio/mollflanders_13_defoe.mp3

Size: 41.7 MB
Duration: 00:45:38

Nikolle Doolin
www.nikolledoolin.com

chrissthegirl
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Post by chrissthegirl » May 17th, 2006, 1:31 pm

Nikolle -- thank you for sharing! I don't know if I do all that consciously, but I do try to listen while I'm editing and make sure nothing sounds awkward.

(Denny, I tried to slow down this time... I think I managed it!)

And the result... section 17:
http://www.yousendit.com/transfer.php?action=download&ufid=051BAFDE7E139DEA

38m18s and 35.9MB
chriss the girl (no url)
chriss

ndoo
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Post by ndoo » May 24th, 2006, 6:46 am

Denny,

I am interested in recording Section 14, but I probably won't have it ready until the second week of June. Let me know if that's OK with you.

Best,
Nikolle

DSayers
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Post by DSayers » May 24th, 2006, 8:51 am

ndoo wrote: I am interested in recording Section 14, but I probably won't have it ready until the second week of June. Let me know if that's OK with you.
That'd be great. I love all your readings.

Moll seems to be taking her good old time getting subscribed ... I wouldn't have thought so!

-denny

freedomrhodes
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Post by freedomrhodes » June 14th, 2006, 6:37 am

Hi, I'd like to sign up for #9 and #10 if you don't mind. :)
Eliz "FreedomRhodes"
http://twogirlsandapodcast.libsyn.com
http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/epalmer

DSayers
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Post by DSayers » June 14th, 2006, 7:49 am

freedomrhodes wrote:Hi, I'd like to sign up for #9 and #10 if you don't mind. :)
They're yours! It's great you're signing up ... I thought this project had stalled, but with you and Ndoo recording, Moll is closer than ever to completion.

-denny

ndoo
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Post by ndoo » June 14th, 2006, 11:31 am

Denny,

I'm still working on section 14, but sign me up for 15 and 16, so we can fill in the gap. Besides, I've grown quite fond of poor Moll.

-Nikolle

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