COMPLETE: [LATIN] Psalmi XXII - OL/ge

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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cadwaladr
Posts: 23
Joined: December 27th, 2005, 7:58 am
Location: Arden Hills, MN
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Post by cadwaladr » January 29th, 2006, 12:28 am

This project is complete and can now be accessed on the LibriVox catalogue: http://librivox.org/biblia-sacra-vulgata-psalmi-xxii/.

I just wanted to be the first to do something in Latin, so here it is. In English versions of the Bible, it is Psalm 23, but in the Vulgate, for some reason, it's 22. In any case, it's here: http://jimcadwell.com/psalmi_xxii.mp3

Don't expect much more Latin from me, since reading it in a natural sort of way is difficult, due to my limited knowledge of the language, but it is fun. Maybe one day I'le do some epigrams from Priapeia. That'd be fun.

Ne prendare, cave, prenso nec fuste nocebo,

saeva nec incurva vulnera falce dabo:
traiectus conto sic extendere pedali,
ut culum rugam non habuisse putes.
See all my Librivox recordings at http://jimcadwell.com/librivox.html

Gesine
Posts: 14156
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » January 29th, 2006, 3:59 am

This is very cool. Thanks! It'll go in our Other languages section... I'll catalogue it soon.

My first Latin teacher used to meet weekly with a group of other teachers, and they talked only in Latin. They had to get around things like 'telephone' by saying things like 'the speaking device connected by cables' so each sentence took a long time! ;)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

raynr
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Joined: December 4th, 2005, 3:45 pm
Location: Munich, Germany

Post by raynr » January 29th, 2006, 4:23 am

Your teachers obviously were too lazy to take a look into the "Lexicon recentis latinitatis". The vatican invented latin words for 15.000 recent expressions. Telephon for example is "telephonium, -ii".
Here's the vatican lexicon:
http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/institutions_connected/latinitas/documents/rc_latinitas_20040601_lexicon_it.html
"Everything in the world exists in order to end in a book." (Stéphane Mallarmé)

Gesine
Posts: 14156
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » January 29th, 2006, 4:25 am

Hehe, excellent! More likely, it didn't exist at the time... certainly not on the internet. I'm _old_, you see... ;)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Kitoune
Posts: 27
Joined: January 20th, 2006, 11:46 am
Location: Lyon - FRANCE

Post by Kitoune » January 29th, 2006, 4:49 am

Hello,

Cheer to have recorded in Latin, it should not be easy !

I try to listen your record but it is too quiet. Have you the same problem ? My volume is however to the maximum...



In french : Bravo pour avoir enregistr? en Latin, ce ne doit pas ?tre facile !

J'essaye d'?couter ton enregistrement mais le son est trop bas. As-tu le m?me probl?me ? Mon volume est pourant au maximum...
Christine

Gesine
Posts: 14156
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » January 29th, 2006, 5:05 am

Hi Christine - yes, I agree, quite quiet. I was going to look into that, together with Jim. :)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Hmm3r
Posts: 5
Joined: February 7th, 2006, 4:40 pm
Location: San Leandro, California

Post by Hmm3r » February 7th, 2006, 5:12 pm

For those who are interested... Jews living in the diaspora (living outside Isarael in the first centuries) spoke Greek, so they used a translation of the Hebrew scriptures called the Septuagint (LXX). The LXX followed a slightly different pattern of rendering the psalms than the Hebrew Masoretic text. They list 151 psalms, combine palms 9 and 10 and 114 and 115, for example. In the fourth century Jerome tried to part from the LXX in the Latin world, returning to the Hebrew MT, but only with limited success. The numbering of the plsams is one thing that remained the same, so that what we know as Psalm 23 remains listed as 22. Modern English Bibles to which we have become accustomed, are translations (or influenced by translations) that are based upon the Hebrew Masoretic text.

Oh, and thank you for doing this. It was a wonderful reading.

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