COMPLETE National Geographic Magazine Vol. 10 - February 1899 - rap

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
silverquill
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Post by silverquill » September 9th, 2021, 10:39 pm

Well, interesting discussion on the old British monetary system!
I recorded this now using shilling, but I can redo it if you like some other way. But how would you read just 2/ ?

And I never understood the slang -- quid, guineas, crowns But, then who remembers what "2 bits is?" Or a "sawbuck?" :lol: (Probably the same people who know what vacuum tubes are). :lol: :lol:

Have not lived in the U.K. but have had two very nice visits there, and would love to return for more extensive travel.

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ngm09_10_01_128kb.mp3
~ Larry

Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » September 10th, 2021, 6:59 am

I googled "2 bits" and Google answered "2 bits = 0,25 bytes" :lol:

But I liked the "sawbuck", the roman X on 10$ bills.

Would you upload your file again? A recording from an older issue came through instead. No shillings in this :mrgreen:

Kalamareader
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Post by Kalamareader » September 10th, 2021, 12:47 pm

silverquill wrote:
September 9th, 2021, 10:39 pm
Well, interesting discussion on the old British monetary system!
I recorded this now using shilling, but I can redo it if you like some other way. But how would you read just 2/ ?

And I never understood the slang -- quid, guineas, crowns But, then who remembers what "2 bits is?" Or a "sawbuck?" :lol: (Probably the same people who know what vacuum tubes are). :lol: :lol:

Have not lived in the U.K. but have had two very nice visits there, and would love to return for more extensive travel.

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ngm09_10_01_128kb.mp3
As to the question about 2/ it would be said "two Shillings" just as when we are speaking about the American system, $2.75 could be said "Two seventy-five", but $2.00 would be said "Two dollars".

Quid: One Pound Sterling. Guinea= 21 shillings or one pound one shilling. Crown=five shillings (the coin). Half Crown=2 shillings six pence coin. Florin=two shilling coin. Shilling coin=12 pence. Tanner=six penny coin. Three penny piece (or thruppnney bit)=three pence (pronounced Thrupence). And of course the penny. Also the Half Penny pronounced "hayp-knee" and the Farthing=1/4 of a penny. They also had a Ten Shilling Note.

Monetary trivia. Did you know that the United States does not have a coin called a penny? The legal name of the coin often called a penny is a 'cent'.

'Nuff for now.

Wayne
Wayne
My wife says I never listen to her, or something like that.

silverquill
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Post by silverquill » September 10th, 2021, 7:57 pm

Well, I have the correct file in my folder, so I probably thought about uploading it, but didn't. Here is another try:

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ngm10_02_01_128kb.mp3

School chant went, "2 bits, 4 bits, six bits, a dollar; all for (school name) stand up and holler). :roll:

Now we will get into piculs and other strange measurements....
I have the next one recorded, but will need some time to edit.
~ Larry

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Post by Availle » September 11th, 2021, 2:05 am

And here's the final section with a runtime of 24:47:

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ngm10_02_08_128kb.mp3
Cheers, Ava.
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Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » September 12th, 2021, 10:28 am

Thank you Ava and Larry! :9: PLOK!

Larry, it sounds great to me as is, unless you want to say "Shillings" for the "2/" at 9:10 (instead of pence).

silverquill
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Post by silverquill » September 13th, 2021, 10:22 am

Oh, no, looks as if I'm last in, but here is Section 4. Turned out to be longer than I expected. And, let me correct the pence to shillings. How did I even do that after all our discussion? :roll:

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ngm10_02_04_128k.mp3 27:03
~ Larry

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Post by Rapunzelina » September 14th, 2021, 2:44 am

Amazing, Larry! Thank you! PL OK!

Last sections in are the best! They get us to the catalogue. :D

alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » September 14th, 2021, 6:44 am

Kalamareader wrote:
September 10th, 2021, 12:47 pm
As to the question about 2/ it would be said "two Shillings" just as when we are speaking about the American system, $2.75 could be said "Two seventy-five", but $2.00 would be said "Two dollars".
Quid: One Pound Sterling. Guinea= 21 shillings or one pound one shilling. Crown=five shillings (the coin). Half Crown=2 shillings six pence coin. Florin=two shilling coin. Shilling coin=12 pence. Tanner=six penny coin. Three penny piece (or thruppnney bit)=three pence (pronounced Thrupence). And of course the penny. Also the Half Penny pronounced "hayp-knee" and the Farthing=1/4 of a penny. They also had a Ten Shilling Note.
The shilling was also known as the bob, so a ten shilling note was ten bob.
The florin was so called because when it was first introduced it was the equivalent of the Dutch guilder, also known as the florint.
The half crown coin was also known as half a dollar as it was worth half of a US dollar which was worth 5 shillings (fixed exchange rate of 4 dollars to 1 pound).
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

silverquill
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Post by silverquill » September 14th, 2021, 7:43 am

Here, I changed the 2 pence to 2 shillings.
https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/ngm10_02_01_128kb.mp3
~ Larry

Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » September 14th, 2021, 1:08 pm

All this talk makes one wonder if the world would be a better place without monetary systems :roll:

Section 1 is PL OK! And that means we're ready for the catalogue! Thank you, Larry!

Kalamareader
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Post by Kalamareader » September 14th, 2021, 2:15 pm

alanmapstone wrote:
September 14th, 2021, 6:44 am

The shilling was also known as the bob, so a ten shilling note was ten bob.
The florin was so called because when it was first introduced it was the equivalent of the Dutch guilder, also known as the florint.
The half crown coin was also known as half a dollar as it was worth half of a US dollar which was worth 5 shillings (fixed exchange rate of 4 dollars to 1 pound).
Interesting about the florin. I had no idea. As for the Half Crown being called Half a Dollar, as noted above, not too long after I got there the Pound was devalued to 2 dollars to 1 pound.
Wayne
My wife says I never listen to her, or something like that.

Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » September 14th, 2021, 2:51 pm

Cataloguing complete: https://librivox.org/the-national-geographic-magazine-vol-10-02-february-1899-by-national-geographic-society/

Thank you everybody! :clap: :clap:

I definitely learnt a lot in this issue! Next issue open here: viewtopic.php?f=28&t=89093

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