[SOLO] The Aeroplane in War by Claude Grahame-White - dc

Upcoming books being recorded by a solo reader
JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 5th, 2020, 7:39 pm

The Aeroplane in War by Claude Grahame-White.

Volunteers outside the USA: Harry Harper died in 1960. The author's work is still protected by copyright in places like Europe, where copyright is author's death plus 70 years, Australia (author's death plus 70 years for authors who died after 1955) or Canada (author's death plus 50 years), UNLESS the rule of shorter term applies. <p>
"Although it is still a crude machine—in view of the perfected apparatus
which is the aim of thoughtful designers—the aeroplane has demonstrated,
in a conclusive way, its value as an instrument of war." ( Authors)
  • Text source (only read from this text!): http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/63597
  • Type of proof-listening required (Note: please read the PL FAQ): standard



    IMPORTANT - soloist, please note: in order to limit the amount of languishing projects (and hence the amount of files on our hard-pressed server), we ask that you post an update at least once a month in your project thread, even if you haven't managed to record anything. If we don't hear from you for three months, your project may be opened up to a group project if a Book Coordinator is found. Files you have completed will be used in this project. If you haven't recorded anything yet, your project will be removed from the forum (contact any admin to see if it can be re-instated).
    Please don't download or listen to files belonging to projects in process (unless you are the BC or PL). Our servers are not set up to handle the greater volume of traffic. Please wait until the project has been completed. Thanks!


    Magic Window:



    BC Admin ===========================================

    Genres for the project: *Non-fiction/War & Military; *Non-fiction/Technology & Engineering/Transportation

    Keywords that describe the book: history, 1912, London, World War 1, WW1, airplane, aeroplane, prediction

    ============================================
  • The reader will record the following at the beginning and end of each file:
    No more than 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning of the recording!
    START of recording (Intro):
    • "[number] Section of The Aeroplane in War. This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox DOT org"
    • If you wish, say:
      "Recording by [your name], [city, your blog, podcast, web address]"
    • Say:
      "The Aeroplane in War, by Claude Grahame-White and Harry Harper. [SECTION]"


    For the second and all subsequent sections, you may optionally use the shortened form of this intro disclaimer:
    • "[number] Section of The Aeroplane in War by Claude Grahame-White and Harry Harper. This LibriVox recording is in the Public Domain."
    • If you wish, say:
      "Recording by JORDAN NASH."
    • Only if applicable, say:
      "[SECTION title]"
    END of recording:
    • At the end of the section, say:
      "End of [SECTION]"
    • If you wish, say:
      "Recording by JORDAN NASH."
    • At the end of the book, say (in addition):
      "End of The Aeroplane in War, by Claude Grahame-White and Harry Harper."

    There should be ~5 seconds silence at the end of the recording.
  • Example filename aeroplaneinwar_##_grahame-white_128kb.mp3 (all lower-case) where ## is the section number (e.g. aeroplaneinwar_01_grahame-white_128kb.mp3)

    Transfer of files (completed recordings)
    Please always post in this forum thread when you've sent a file. Also, post the length of the recording (file duration: mm:ss) together with the link.
    • Upload your file with the LibriVox Uploader: https://librivox.org/login/uploader Image
      (If you have trouble reading the image above, please message an admin)
    • You'll need to select the MC, which for this project is: craigdav1
    • When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - please post it in this thread.
    • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page.

    Any questions?
    Please post below
Last edited by JordanN on November 7th, 2020, 2:39 pm, edited 4 times in total.

JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 5th, 2020, 7:42 pm

Table of contents:

Code: Select all

PREFACE

FIRST SECTION REVIEW OF PROGRESS PRIOR TO THE FIRST MILITARY TESTS OF AEROPLANES
I. Dawn of flight—Encouragement in Europe and America—England's lost opportunities—The pioneers.
II. First practical flights—The Wright brothers; the Voisins; Farman—The cross-Channel flight.
III. Aeroplanes at Rheims, 1909—Wright, Voisin, Farman, Blériot, Antoinette—The Gnome engine—First military orders.
IV. The human factor—Growing skill of airmen—Feats of 1910, as compared with those of 1909—Cross-country flying.

SECOND SECTION FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH AEROPLANES IN THE FRENCH AUTUMN MANOEUVRES, 1910.
I. The historic Picardy tests—First official report upon movements of troops, as gleaned by aeroplane.
II. Second conclusive test—Detecting an army in retreat—France's determination to possess an air-fleet.

THIRD SECTION THE GROWING AIR-FLEETS OF FOREIGN NATIONS
I. Activity in France—Two hundred machines at the end of 1911; a thousand promised by the year 1914.
II. The great French tests of military aeroplanes—Striking results obtained—Era of fast, "air-worthy," weight-carrying machines.
III. Germany's aerial policy—Secret energies in creating a fleet of war aeroplanes—Rivalry with France.
IV. Progress in Russia, America, and other countries-England's position in the autumn of 1911.

FOURTH SECTION IMPORTANCE OF ORGANISATION IN THE USE OF WAR AEROPLANES
I. French plans for the concerted use of squadrons of machines in time of war.
II. Value of air-stations—Selection of landing-grounds—Preparing air-maps.

FIFTH SECTION ENGLAND'S POSITION IN REGARDS TO MILITARY FLYING
I. Lessons which were ignored—Work of the Parliamentary Aerial Defence Committee.
II. Policy of "moving cautiously"—Peril of lagging behind in aerial armament.
III. The financial aspect—Money England is spending—The airship policy—Insufficient provision for aeroplanes.
IV. Dangers of a policy of "drift"—Experience which money cannot buy—Trained men, not so much as machines, the criterion of strength.
V. England's official awakening—The training of 100 airmen—The forthcoming trials of military machines.

SIXTH SECTION WAR AEROPLANES AT THE PARIS AERONAUTICAL EXHIBITION, DECEMBER, 1911
I. Latest-type military monoplanes—Two-seated, reconnoitring machines—Single-seated, high-speed aircraft.
II. Latest developments in biplane construction—The engine-in-front, weight-carrying machine.
III. Healthy position of the French industry—What England has lacked—Danger of neglecting home builders.

SEVENTH SECTION WHAT EXISTING WAR AEROPLANES CAN ACTUALLY ACCOMPLISH
I. Plight of a Commander-in-Chief without an aeroplane corps—The work of cavalry reconnaissance.
II. Work of a squadron of air-scouts described—Tasks of the pilot and observer—Combined reconnaissance by many machines—Effect of aeroplanes upon tactics.
III. Other uses of the war aeroplane—Surveying—Dispatch-carrying—Directing gun-fire—Transport of staff officers.

EIGHTH SECTION WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY AND PHOTOGRAPHY AS AIDS TO AERIAL RECONNAISSANCE
I. First tests and successes with wireless telegraphy—Difficulty of equipping an aeroplane with transmitting plant.
II. French triumphs with wireless telegraphy—Messages sent over a distance of thirty-five miles.
III. Practical uses of wireless upon aeroplanes—England's lack of effort.
IV. Photography from a war aeroplane—The use of special automatic cameras.

NINTH SECTION DEVELOPMENT OF ALL-WEATHER WAR AEROPLANES
I. Flights in thirty-five-mile-an-hour winds—Arguments of sceptics—What the great contests of 1911 proved.
II. Value of high speed, when combating a wind—Constructional difficulties of a hundred-mile-an-hour machine.
III. Variable-speed aeroplane—Plans for constructing aircraft of this type—Advantages of such a machine.
IV. Power-plant of aeroplanes—Fitting two engines to obviate involuntary descents.

TENTH SECTION THE TRAINING OF ARMY AIRMEN
I. French thoroughness—An expert's tribute—Sound training all-important.
II. How the military airman is "schooled"—His course of instruction described.
III. Rules for training—Dummy aeroplanes—A pupil's first "hops."
IV. Cross-country flights—The vol plané—Difficulty of first observation tests from an aeroplane.
V. Finishing work at French schools—Practical tests—German thoroughness—Energy of English officers.

ELEVENTH SECTION THE COST OF WAR AEROPLANES
I. Why manufacturers charge high prices—Cost of experimental work—Building of trial machines.
II. Economy of a large military order for machines—The incidental expenses.
III. Question of renewals—General cheapness of an air-corps, as compared with other forms of armament.
OUR AERIAL PROGRAMME FOR 1912-13

TWELFTH SECTION PROBLEM OF ARTILLERY FIRE AND THE AEROPLANE
I. Conflicting opinions as to an aeroplane's vulnerability—Experiments which have been carried out.
II. Shrapnel shell—Question of hitting a vital part of the aeroplane—Difficulty of identifying friend or foe.

THIRTEENTH SECTION DESTRUCTIVE POTENTIALITIES OF WEIGHT-CARRYING AEROPLANES
I. What a modern-type machine can raise—Load of two men, and explosives.
II. Effect of aerial bombardment upon cities and troops—German tests.

FOURTEENTH SECTION WAR IN THE AIR BETWEEN HOSTILE AEROPLANES
I. Certainty of a combat between aeroplanes in actual warfare—Air-scouts protected by aerial "cruisers."
II. An encounter in the air—Importance to an army of an aerial victory.

FIFTEENTH SECTION VALUE OF THE AEROPLANE IN NAVAL WARFARE
I. Machines for coastal and high-seas work—Question of flying in winds.
II. Interesting tests—Machines for rising from water, and landing on a ship's deck.

SIXTEENTH SECTION AERIAL WORK IN THE FRENCH AND GERMAN AUTUMN MANOEUVRES, 1911
I. French successes—Proof of the value of organisation—Flights in high winds.
II. Work in the German manœuvres—An instance of the utility of air-scouts—Reconnoitring from high altitudes.
III. Aeroplanes in actual warfare—What Italian airmen accomplished in Tripoli—Scouting and bomb-dropping under service conditions.
IV. A final word—Conclusions to be arrived at—Problems outstanding.[code]

markfriendlds
Posts: 57
Joined: July 15th, 2020, 3:25 am

Post by markfriendlds » November 6th, 2020, 9:40 am

I'd like to take this project.
Please advise, and thank you.

JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 6th, 2020, 10:38 am

markfriendlds wrote:
November 6th, 2020, 9:40 am
I'd like to take this project.
Please advise, and thank you.

Hi Mark,

I’m glad you also find the topic interesting. I was planning to record this one as my first solo, but I could use a proof listener to make sure that I do it right. Would you be interested in serving as PL?

JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 7th, 2020, 1:16 pm

Still awaiting volunteers for DPL and MC. Any takers?

craigdav1
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 23536
Joined: December 17th, 2011, 3:56 pm
Location: Chicago

Post by craigdav1 » November 7th, 2020, 1:27 pm

Setting up MW now.

JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 7th, 2020, 1:28 pm

craigdav1 wrote:
November 7th, 2020, 1:27 pm
Setting up MW now.
Thanks! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

craigdav1
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 23536
Joined: December 17th, 2011, 3:56 pm
Location: Chicago

Post by craigdav1 » November 7th, 2020, 1:58 pm

Welcome first-time BC
This project is now set up in the database. Since this will be your first project as soloist/book coordinator (BC), you will need to set up a password for access to the workflow system so you can enter the information into the section compiler which then appears in the "Magic Window" in the top post. Here are some links to detailed instructions for logging into the system and setting a password the first time, as well as for entering and editing information in the section compiler.

First Time Logging in to the Workflow
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BxWB83bbALTQYjlENGZ0SVJUWWs/edit

Instructions for BCs and DPLs
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kVj409nG_E0XJ5UrrcL7EVx7Qyx-2UQ7dbw4mINi3XQ/edit

A version of the above is also in the LibriVox wiki in case you can't access Google Docs for some reason.
https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/BC's:_How_to_update_the_Magic_Window

ID3 tags will be added during cataloging so you don't need to add them to your files.

If you have any questions, let me know. Sections can be added by you or deleted by me. I'll leave this thread here in the Launch Pad for a day or so longer before I move it to the Going Solo forum, to see if a DPL (Dedicated Proof Listener) volunteers. If you already have someone in mind as DPL just let me know.
I've added some information to the MW merely as a suggestion. Feel free to make changes but realize that long titles may be truncated. When you upload a section, it's your responsibility to add the link and duration (mm:ss) to the Magic Window. The link from the uploader goes in the "Listen URL" column, duration goes in the "notes" column. You also change the "status" to "Ready for PL". Be sure to post in the thread that a new section is ready for PL so your DPL knows there is something new.
Some of the contents of the MW will appear in the final project page that listeners see and it will be used to create the ID3 tags that appear on their mp3 player. Again, welcome to your first solo project.
DaveC

JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 7th, 2020, 1:59 pm

craigdav1 wrote:
November 7th, 2020, 1:58 pm
Welcome first-time BC
This project is now set up in the database. Since this will be your first project as soloist/book coordinator (BC), you will need to set up a password for access to the workflow system so you can enter the information into the section compiler which then appears in the "Magic Window" in the top post. Here are some links to detailed instructions for logging into the system and setting a password the first time, as well as for entering and editing information in the section compiler.

First Time Logging in to the Workflow
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BxWB83bbALTQYjlENGZ0SVJUWWs/edit

Instructions for BCs and DPLs
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kVj409nG_E0XJ5UrrcL7EVx7Qyx-2UQ7dbw4mINi3XQ/edit

A version of the above is also in the LibriVox wiki in case you can't access Google Docs for some reason.
https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/BC's:_How_to_update_the_Magic_Window

ID3 tags will be added during cataloging so you don't need to add them to your files.

If you have any questions, let me know. Sections can be added by you or deleted by me. I'll leave this thread here in the Launch Pad for a day or so longer before I move it to the Going Solo forum, to see if a DPL (Dedicated Proof Listener) volunteers. If you already have someone in mind as DPL just let me know.
I've added some information to the MW merely as a suggestion. Feel free to make changes but realize that long titles may be truncated. When you upload a section, it's your responsibility to add the link and duration (mm:ss) to the Magic Window. The link from the uploader goes in the "Listen URL" column, duration goes in the "notes" column. You also change the "status" to "Ready for PL". Be sure to post in the thread that a new section is ready for PL so your DPL knows there is something new.
Some of the contents of the MW will appear in the final project page that listeners see and it will be used to create the ID3 tags that appear on their mp3 player. Again, welcome to your first solo project.
DaveC
Thanks, Dave!

craigdav1
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 23536
Joined: December 17th, 2011, 3:56 pm
Location: Chicago

Post by craigdav1 » November 7th, 2020, 2:03 pm

A couple of comments specific to your book. In the intro, you should say [number] section not chapter [number] of The Aer..... Also in the intro you should mention both author's names. Feel free to ask questions and correct me if I've misunderstood something.

edit: By clicking on the little pencil icon at the top of your first post you can edit it to include these changes so your DPL will not be confused when they listen to the intros.

JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 7th, 2020, 2:41 pm

craigdav1 wrote:
November 7th, 2020, 2:03 pm
A couple of comments specific to your book. In the intro, you should say [number] section not chapter [number] of The Aer..... Also in the intro you should mention both author's names. Feel free to ask questions and correct me if I've misunderstood something.

edit: By clicking on the little pencil icon at the top of your first post you can edit it to include these changes so your DPL will not be confused when they listen to the intros.
Okay. I've updated the MW with the section titles and modified the intro scripts to specific section and both author names. For convenience, I filled in my name as well (in case I forget it under the stress of recording?).

Do I have to list both author names for each section, or just the Preface?

craigdav1
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 23536
Joined: December 17th, 2011, 3:56 pm
Location: Chicago

Post by craigdav1 » November 7th, 2020, 2:49 pm

JordanN wrote:
November 7th, 2020, 2:41 pm
Do I have to list both author names for each section, or just the Preface?
While shorter to me is always better, I can't seem to justify not mentioning both authors in each intro (though I definitely would use the shortened intro).

JordanN
Posts: 75
Joined: April 13th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Post by JordanN » November 7th, 2020, 2:59 pm

craigdav1 wrote:
November 7th, 2020, 2:49 pm
JordanN wrote:
November 7th, 2020, 2:41 pm
Do I have to list both author names for each section, or just the Preface?
While shorter to me is always better, I can't seem to justify not mentioning both authors in each intro (though I definitely would use the shortened intro).
I'm ready to start recording.

In the intro script, what do I call the Preface?
  • "0th section"
  • Section 0
  • "Preface"

craigdav1
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 23536
Joined: December 17th, 2011, 3:56 pm
Location: Chicago

Post by craigdav1 » November 7th, 2020, 3:36 pm

Preface.

markfriendlds
Posts: 57
Joined: July 15th, 2020, 3:25 am

Post by markfriendlds » November 7th, 2020, 8:22 pm

I'd be happy to PL.

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