SOLO - Six lectures on literature by C.H. Herford-ans

Upcoming books being recorded by a solo reader
eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » October 19th, 2017, 5:19 am

Six lectures on literature by Charles Harold Herford (1853 - 1931).
Six lectures on literary topics by C. H. Herford, delivered at public venues during his tenure as Professor of English Literature at the Victoria University of Manchester for 1901 to 1921. ( Phil Benson)
  • Text source (only read from this text!):

    Lecture 1: https://archive.org/details/cu31924013264738
    Lecture 2: https://archive.org/details/bearingofenglish00herfrich
    Lecture 3: https://archive.org/details/istherepoeticvie00herfrich
    Lecture 4: https://archive.org/details/poetryoflucretiu00herfrich
    Lecture 5: https://archive.org/details/norsemythinengli00herf
    Lecture 6: https://archive.org/details/thenormalityofsh00herfuoft
  • Type of proof-listening required (Note: please read the PL FAQ): standard

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    BC Admin Genres for the project: *Non-fiction/Literary Criticism

    Keywords that describe the book: poetry, English literature, Manchester, norse myth

    ============================================
  • The reader will record the following at the beginning and end of each file:
    No more than 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning of the recording!
    START of recording (Intro):
    • "Lecture [number] of Six lectures on literature. This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox DOT org"
    • If you wish, say:
      "Recording by [your name], [city, your blog, podcast, web address]"
    • Say:
      "Six lectures on literature, by Charles Harold Herford. [Chapter]"


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    • "Lecture [number] of Six lectures on literature by Charles Harold Herford. This LibriVox recording is in the Public Domain."
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      "Recording by [your name], [city, your blog, podcast, web address]"
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      "[Lecture title]"
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      "End of [Lecture]"
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      "End of Six lectures on literature, by Charles Harold Herford. "

    There should be 5 seconds silence at the end of the recording, or 10 seconds for files longer than 30 minutes.
  • Example filename lectures_##_herford_128kb.mp3 (all lower-case) where ## is the section number (e.g. lectures_01_herford_128kb.mp3)

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Last edited by eggs4ears on October 19th, 2017, 3:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » October 19th, 2017, 5:21 am

Annise will MC and Newgatenovelist will DPL.

I've included the text link for the first file I have ready to upload (Norse myths...) - I can post the others later.

annise
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Post by annise » October 19th, 2017, 5:36 am

I'll set it up - back soon

Anne

Ok - you have an MW. Maybe rather than chapter you should say lecture i.e lecture 1 ........ end of lecture 1 ?
Our objective is to make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet. - Hugh McGuire.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » October 19th, 2017, 2:33 pm

Reporting for duty! I'm dead curious to know what the other five topics of the lectures will be.

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » October 19th, 2017, 4:02 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/lectures_05_herford.mp3 - 67:18 - Ready for PL.

Considerate of him to time this lecture to fit in the 70 minute limit! I hope he did the same with the rest of them :)

Thanks for setting up the MW. All the titles are there and I've also added the links to the sources. Yes, 'lecture' will sound better than 'chapter'. I've changed that.

annise
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Post by annise » October 19th, 2017, 4:59 pm

Most CD's are about 80mins now - that's why we have a top limit, people burn them to cd for listeners that find mp3 players hard to use.

Anne
Our objective is to make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet. - Hugh McGuire.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » October 20th, 2017, 2:27 am

These look even better than I thought, and there's a real gem I wasn't expecting!

I'll probably PL at the start of the week. Nothing like getting a (forecast) rainy Monday off to a good start!

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » October 23rd, 2017, 1:01 pm

This is brilliant. I'm so glad you're rescuing these lectures from obscurity. And can you imagine how cool it would have been to hear this delivered in John Rylands? You find the greatest things to read.

I have various notes. Some of them are pretty minor, but I've noted them because I tend to hold poetry, including extracts, to a higher PL standard than prose. You can make the call on some of these for yourself, but at least they're there for you to decide.

1.11-1.16. P. 5, penultimate line of Morris poem:
...and your ears [heard eyes] might hear
Earth's voices as they are indeed.

6.26-6.31. P. 7, second half of first paragraph. Self-correction:
...becomes more and more con- becomes more and more inconceivable after it.

21.22-21.26. P. 12, l. 5 of the Sibyl's speech. Extra word added:
Long on these mould'ring bones [that] have beat...

23.36-23.40. P. 13, l. 2 of indented quotation. Extra word added:
Where shaggy forms o'er [the] ice-built mountains roam.

24.52-24.56. P. 14, top of page, last line of quotation:
And weave with [heard the] bloody hands the tissue of thy line.

43.00-43.04. P. 20, penultimate line in first indented quotation of part 5:
And the bleak sun lighteth the wave-vault, and tells [heard tales] of the fruitless plain...

50.20-50.22. P. 23. Omission of 'VI' at commencement of new section


More please!

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » October 23rd, 2017, 3:02 pm

Thanks, Erin! All those errors need to be corrected. Actually, this is quite difficult to read as he tends to use quite long sentences and sometimes inserts a few lines of poetry in the middle of a sentence. Lecturers must have expected much more of their listeners in those days than they do today - And he he did it all without Powerpoint!

I read the Norse Myth lecture because of the connection to Morris, but I don't recall how I found it. I have also had his book on the age of Wordsworth (https://archive.org/details/ageofwordsworth00herfuoft) on a long list of books to read for quite a while.

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » October 24th, 2017, 6:21 am

Oooh, yeah, that looks good. It ought to go without saying, but if you do ever fancy recording that, put me down for DPL. It's easy for me to say, because my own list keeps growing faster than I can read or record!

Thanks for the laugh. My thoughts were uncool and old school, and I was wondering what his handouts would have looked like if he'd been the right generation...

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » November 3rd, 2017, 6:00 am

Norse Myth corrected and reuploaded.

Which is the one that you are looking forward to?

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » November 3rd, 2017, 8:42 am

I've said see PL notes because there's one where I can't hear the change:

21.22-21.26. P. 12, l. 5 of the Sibyl's speech. Extra word added:
Long on these mould'ring bones [that] have beat...

Have a listen and see if it's just me.

The lectures all look good, and 'the permanent power of English poetry' sounds like a rallying cry for nerds! I'm not surprised he's covering Shakespeare, but I am pleased that he wrote on Lucretius. In the last few months I've been reading round later interpreters of Lucretius, so seeing this lecture pop up here was a bonus.

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » November 4th, 2017, 1:02 am

Yes, that's right, I missed that one.

I have already read the permanent power... it's a rampage through two millennia of English poetry. Lucretius looks like an interesting one - it is preventing me from calling this 'Six lectures on English literature', which would have had a better ring to it.

eggs4ears
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Post by eggs4ears » December 5th, 2017, 5:40 am

https://librivox.org/uploads/annise/lectures_01_herford.mp3 - 55:20 - Ready for PL

I should have said a rampage through European poetry. It turns out that English poetry is the best, mainly because it is English. Those were the days!

Newgatenovelist
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Post by Newgatenovelist » December 5th, 2017, 3:22 pm

Scholarship has changed quite a bit, hasn't it? It did cross my mind that I'm not sure I would have known how to take good lecture notes if I were in his original audience.

I just realised none of my solos, past or projected for the next year, are of the poets he mentioned. I don't know if he'd consider some of these authors second rate or if they're even further down the ladder than that!


A couple of notes for lecture one:

2.02-2.06. P. 7, last line of poetry. Extra word:
...whoever meaneth
To wander afar on the paths of [the] ocean.

5.54-6.00. P. 9, part I, mid-paragraph:
Prometheus and Zeus, Orestes and Eumenides, Antigone and Creon...
Check pronunciation of Antigone:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/antigone

8.15-8.20. P. 10, line between indented quotations:
...as in the great epitaph of Simonides upon those who fell at Thermopylae...
Check pronunciations of Simonides and Thermopylae:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/simonides
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/thermopylae
That second one is being a bit fussy, but it's in the same sentence so I thought I might as well bung it in the notes.


Are the links okay, or for future reference would you prefer it if I were to paste the phonemic pronunciation across?

Erin

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