[SOLO] The Story of My Life, by Helen Keller - Leni

Upcoming books being recorded by a solo reader
msfry
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Post by msfry » June 22nd, 2021, 8:26 pm

11 is PL OK. I love this phrase: "I lived myself into all things". But that train story was too scary! And I wish she would tell us how she knew about vines stretching from tree to tree and such details, when she can't see them.
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Teabender
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Post by Teabender » June 23rd, 2021, 7:29 am

I agree, that train part was intense. And yes! I've been wondering about that too, why she described things she couldn't see. Was it because she felt it was the proper thing to do (as in, this is how you write a book for people who can see), or because she was doing her best to please Miss Sullivan and others? I have to assume those details came from Miss Sullivan and maybe friends and family. I feel bad sometimes wondering how much of the story is Helen Keller herself and how much of it is her trying to conform to other people's expectations, whether real or imagined.

msfry
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Post by msfry » June 23rd, 2021, 8:03 am

I was a Montessori school teacher for 27 years. I taught experientially wherever possible, largely through field trips, cooking, working with clay, pressing leaves and flowers, painting, singing, clapping, dancing. One exercise was to put 3-10 common objects on a desk. Blindfold the child and ask them to find the pen, the doll, the spoon, etc. Later they would just pick up an object and name it. My son asks why I don't do pottery anymore since I love it so much. "Because I don't have anyone to teach it to." It would not surprise me if Miss Sullivan was behind the writing of this book, calling to Helen's attention things that delighted her, like the festooned vines, maybe putting long vines in Helen's hands and having her "drape them" about. Draping is a concept, and how to teach how tall trees are? How deep a canyon? Challenging to be sure. Did Miss Sullivan write a book revealing her teaching secrets?
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Teabender
Posts: 57
Joined: March 27th, 2021, 7:30 pm

Post by Teabender » June 23rd, 2021, 3:12 pm

Using hands-on experiences as much as possible sounds like an enriching way to learn. I'm not finding references to anything Miss Sullivan wrote herself, which is a shame, because I'd love to read about her teaching methods and how she felt about her role in Helen's life. She must have had extraordinary patience, creativity, and love for what she was doing.

msfry
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Post by msfry » June 23rd, 2021, 4:25 pm

Indeed, the vast majority of us die without leaving our autobiographies behind, nor any essays, nor even a few problem solving tips we learned along the way.

Here's one of mine: Got fruit flies, horse flies, moths, spiders or roaches in your kitchen? Keep a spray bottle of Windex next to the sink, and when you see a critter, spray it. It croaks within seconds, and it doesn't harm anything else. If the problem is larger than a few, spray it down your sink drain and in your kitchen trashcan. Within a few days, the problem is over. Kills larvae and caterpillars too.

We could all probably write a booklet at least, but we don't and all that learning is lost. Check out my recently completed project Sir Titus Salt, who didn't leave a single memoir. But his pastor took it upon himself to gather together all his material so we could remember this great philanthropist. An amazing story I was proud to bring to audio. And I'm looking for more. :D
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Teabender
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Joined: March 27th, 2021, 7:30 pm

Post by Teabender » June 25th, 2021, 7:28 pm

I'll have to remember that the next time I have a roach problem :D

Congratulations on completing the Sir Titus Salt project! It sounds like he accomplished great things, and fortunately he had someone in his life who made sure his story would be remembered.

Teabender
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Post by Teabender » June 27th, 2021, 6:24 pm

Chapter 12 ready, fun with snow: https://librivox.org/uploads/leni/storyofmylife_12_keller_128kb.mp3

Duration: 4:25

msfry
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Post by msfry » June 28th, 2021, 7:17 am

12 is PL OK. Good job!

I am really beginning to question how a blind and deaf person could write in such great detail about the winter snows. I am going to watch some version of the movie The Miracle Worker in the next few days. Maybe it will explain this better.
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Teabender
Posts: 57
Joined: March 27th, 2021, 7:30 pm

Post by Teabender » July 2nd, 2021, 8:01 am

Chapter 13 ready: https://librivox.org/uploads/leni/storyofmylife_13_keller_128kb.mp3

Duration: 8:32

Did The Miracle Worker explain more of how Helen was able to describe so much? I have vague memories of seeing the water pump scene from what must have been the 1979 version of The Miracle Worker. I just watched both the 1962 and 1979 versions of that scene on YouTube, and the first version is especially powerful. I really should watch the whole thing.

msfry
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Post by msfry » July 2nd, 2021, 9:52 am

Chapter 13 is PL OK.

I checked and there are two movie versions available on AmazonPrime for $3.99 1962 and 2000 versions. Both have the party feature available. Maybe we could watch it together sometime! That would be fun.
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Teabender
Posts: 57
Joined: March 27th, 2021, 7:30 pm

Post by Teabender » July 11th, 2021, 7:17 pm

I'll probably be slower with things this month because of work and other craziness lately, sorry :( But for now chapter 14 is ready: https://librivox.org/uploads/leni/storyofmylife_14_keller_128kb.mp3

Duration: 15:57

msfry
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Post by msfry » July 12th, 2021, 11:55 am

Chapter 14, The Frost King, is PL OK. Well done! :thumbs:

She spells out the plagiarism dilemma quite clearly. I have hundreds of what I believe are "original thoughts" or "unique solutions", i.e., not from another, which give me a certain amount of esteem for my own cleverness. But are they?

I'll be looking forward to your next installment, whenever that is.
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Teabender
Posts: 57
Joined: March 27th, 2021, 7:30 pm

Post by Teabender » July 13th, 2021, 8:23 pm

Thank you! :) And yes, it's often hard to know just how "original" your thoughts are. Sometimes I'll mention this thought or idea I had, and then my husband or co-worker or whoever will say, yeah, actually I told you that last week.Oops.

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