Dmitry Petrovich Svyatopolk-Mirsky Bibliography (3 Titles)

Suggest and discuss books to read (all languages welcome!)
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LectorRecitator
Posts: 187
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » January 12th, 2021, 3:15 am

DMITRY PETROVICH SVYATOPOLK-MIRSKY (1890–1939)

Anthology Of Russian Poetry (1924)

Modern Russian Literature (1925)

📖 110 pages long.

https://archive.org/details/modernrussianlit0000mirs/page/n5/mode/2up

Contemporary Russian Literature: 1881–1925 (1926)

ℹ️ "The present history of Russian literature since 1881 (the year of Dostoevsky's death) is planned so as to form a continuation of a book which I am preparing on the period preceding that date. The date has been chosen as a convenient landmark, but it is by no means a vital turning-point in the life-story of Russian literature. It marks an end rather than a beginning: the end of the classical age of Russian Realism.

In presenting modern Russian literature to the English-speaking public, I have tried to keep as near as possible to the facts, and advisedly refrained from generalizations. My book aims at nothing more ambitious than being a Baedeker or a Murray's Guide to Recent Russian Literature. Bird's-eye views—which are so easily taken by the foreigner who is unburdened by too much knowledge, and so difficult to the Russian whose wideness of outlook is obscured by a too intimate acquaintance with concrete detail—will be found wanting. I would be happy if the few new facts and points of view offered in these pages will modify the simplified and hasty conclusions which have been arrived at, by Anglo-Saxons and others, on the subject of my country."
(Preface)

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015000668403&view=2up&seq=6

A History Of Russian Literature: From The Earliest Times To The Death Of Dostoyevsky (1881) (1927)

ℹ️ "This book is planned so as to lead up to and form one whole with Contemporary Russian Literature (1881–1925). But, covering as it does a much larger stretch of time and only a slightly greater number of pages, the present volume is on a somewhat less detailed scale than its companion.

It is continued to a date which may be regarded as the end of the “classical” age of the Russian novel and which coincides with the death of Dostoyevsky and Turgenev and the conversion of Tolstoy. No hard and fast divisions being possible in the complex fabric of history, the dividing line between the two volumes is not in all points strictly chronological. Some writers who produced much of their best work before 1880, but are not typical of the age, have been included in Contemporary Russian Literature. This is the case with Leskov, Leontiev, and Sluchevsky. Tolstoy has been cut in two between the two books. In a few cases there is a slight overlapping.

In writing of the literature of a country whose history is very little known abroad I was all the time under the temptation of enlarging on general historical and cultural topics. But for fear of making the book too hideously long (and, as it is, I had too little time at my disposal to make it as short as I should have liked to) I have cut out all this general information."
(Preface)

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.32106006142100&view=2up&seq=8

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.32106006142100&view=2up&seq=8

Kazbek
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Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » January 12th, 2021, 5:15 pm

I've been planning to do the last two as solo projects, starting after my current one, but I wasn't aware of the shorter book. Nice finds!

Michael

LectorRecitator
Posts: 187
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » January 13th, 2021, 10:30 am

Kazbek wrote:
January 12th, 2021, 5:15 pm
I've been planning to do the last two as solo projects, starting after my current one, but I wasn't aware of the shorter book. Nice finds!

Michael
A charming one, isn't it? It constitutes part of "The World's Manuals" series—alongside Levy's "Persian Literature" and Taylor's "Greek Philosophy". These were published by Oxford University Press during the 1920s and despite their short length, they are quite informative.

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