Tannhäuser by Wagner, Richard

Suggest and discuss books to read (all languages welcome!)
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Carolin
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Post by Carolin » October 18th, 2020, 2:41 am

https://archive.org/details/tannhuser00wagn
Tannhäuser
by Wagner, Richard, 1813-1883; Huckel, Oliver, 1864-1940

This is epic poetry as it should be, one epicly long poem about knights and damsels and stuff. Really one to enjoy.
If you dont know the story check out wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tannh%C3%A4user_(opera)
Carolin

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » October 18th, 2020, 10:40 am

Lovely verse!
Close to the peaceful vale of Eisenach,
In far Thuringia, towers a gloomy mount,
The Horselberg, a grim and lonely pile,
Long called "the hill of Venus," with its cave, -
Unfathomed depths of subterranean gloom, -
Where men have lost their souls in heathen love
To that fair goddess of the evil heart,
Who, banished from the light by the white Christ,
Holds now her court and pagan revelries,
Deep in the dark abysses of the earth.
Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

maxgal
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Post by maxgal » October 18th, 2020, 2:32 pm

Peter Why wrote:
October 18th, 2020, 10:40 am
Lovely verse!
Close to the peaceful vale of Eisenach,
In far Thuringia, towers a gloomy mount,
The Horselberg, a grim and lonely pile,
Long called "the hill of Venus," with its cave, -
Unfathomed depths of subterranean gloom, -
Where men have lost their souls in heathen love
To that fair goddess of the evil heart,
Who, banished from the light by the white Christ,
Holds now her court and pagan revelries,
Deep in the dark abysses of the earth.
Peter

Do it, Peter! :D
(I double dog dare you.)
Louise
"every little breeze..."

Peter Why
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Joined: November 24th, 2005, 3:54 am
Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)

Post by Peter Why » October 18th, 2020, 8:24 pm

I'm not likely to read it, as I have another big project to finish. If it's still unread when I'm done, I might have a go.

The poem itself is only 61 pages, with just over eight pages of introduction.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

alanmapstone
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Location: Oxford

Post by alanmapstone » October 30th, 2020, 10:08 pm

This is fascinating, I never even knew this poem existed :thumbs:
This text could be ideal for a Dramatic Reading if anyone was prepared to take on the work involved. Perhaps I will post it in the DR suggestion thread.
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

Peter Why
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Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)

Post by Peter Why » October 31st, 2020, 12:50 am

Go for it; the poetry looks gorgeous .... very lovecraftian.

I looked for the translator's date of death. Oliver Huckel, 1864-1940. Here he is ( https://archives.upenn.edu/exhibits/penn-people/biography/oliver-huckel ). He's noted as a poet and fan of Wagner.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

alanmapstone
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Location: Oxford

Post by alanmapstone » November 4th, 2020, 11:10 pm

Translator died in 1940 so it is PD for those of us in the UK or Europe :thumbs:
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

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