E. M. Wilmot-Buxton Unrecorded Bibliography (14 Titles)

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LectorRecitator
Posts: 157
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » October 1st, 2020, 11:48 am

ETHEL MARY WILMOT-BUXTON (1870–1923)

Makers Of Europe: Outlines Of European History For The Middle Forms Of Schools (1905)

📖 Divided in short chapters, in turn divided into subsections.

https://archive.org/details/makerseuropeout00buxgoog/page/n10/mode/2up

https://archive.org/details/makerseuropeout00buxgoog/page/n10/mode/2up

Stories Of Early England (1907)

https://archive.org/details/storiesofearlyen00wilm_0/page/n7/mode/2up

The Book Of Rustem (1907)

https://archive.org/details/bookrustem00buxgoog/page/n12/mode/2up

Told By The Northmen: Stories From The Eddas And Sagas (1908)

📖 Divided in short chapters; Ideal for novice readers.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/29551

Stories From Old French Romance (1910)

📖 Divided in short chapters; Ideal for novice readers.

https://archive.org/details/storiesfromoldfr00wilm/page/n7/mode/2up

The Story Of The Crusades (1910)

📖 Divided in short chapters; Ideal for novice readers.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/47780

Wales (1911)

📖 90 pages long. Divided in short chapters; Ideal for novice readers.

ℹ️ Part of the "Peeps At Many Lands" series.

https://archive.org/details/wales00wilm/page/n9/mode/2up

The Struggle With The Crown: (1603–1715) (1912)

ℹ️ "IN the days of the Stuart kings, about three hundred years ago, one of the greatest and most important changes known to British history began to take place.

The change was the passing of the governing power from the King to Parliament. Such an event would have been remarkable enough if it had been part of some vast movement that was operating throughout Europe. It is still more remarkable in that it was confined to England only ; that in England alone did this great change in the form of government take place.

It follows that the causes of the revolution must be looked for in England herself, in the life and character of the people of the land ; and the more closely we can study these, and the more vividly realise them, the nearer we shall be to understanding why this change was bound to come, as well as how it came.

So we shall presently read in these pages something of the manner of ordinary life, the "social" condition of the English men and women of those days, and we shall see how this produced certain types of character, often differing very widely from one another. We shall watch the Cavalier riding past in his feathered hat and long love-curls ; and the Puritan, in his sad-coloured coat and wide-brimmed hat, walking with his eyes cast upon the ground. And later on we shall find these representatives of the two great political parties at close grips with one another in a civil war."
(Introduction)

https://archive.org/details/strugglewithcrow00wilmuoft/page/n5/mode/2up

Jeanne D'Arc (1914)

https://archive.org/details/jeannedarc01wilm/page/n7/mode/2up

A Social History Of England From Anglo-Saxon Times: For Upper And Middle Forms (1920)

ℹ️ "THERE are two methods of writing Social History for the young. The first and easier way is to chat pleasantly about the manners and dress of each period. The second is to describe certain lines of development which appear to have affected the community very closely, and to exclude others. This latter method involves the sacrifice of much picturesque detail, and lays the writer open to the charge of having omitted to deal with subjects that, for one reason or another, appeal especially to the individual critic.

But it seems to be the only way to account for certain modern conditions of no small importance, which cannot be fully understood till their history is known ; and this, one may believe, is the chief, if not the only, value of Social History as an educational subject.

For the reason given above, this book is planned so as to describe the historical growth of certain social developments according to the century or half century during which they became most prominent. This has involved some disregard of arbitrary limits, such as periods or reigns ; but from the time of the Conquest, at any rate, it has been found possible to deal more or less continuously with such movements as the growth of towns, of freedom from villeinage, of Tudor Nationalism ; the rise of the burgher, of the modern "middle class" and of the still more modern democracy, by describing their origin and development in the period when they are most in historical evidence."
(Introduction)

https://archive.org/details/cu31924027939457/page/n7/mode/2up

https://archive.org/details/socialhistoryofe00wilmuoft/page/n7/mode/2up

The Story Of Hildebrand, St. Gregory VII (1920)

https://archive.org/details/thestoryofhildeb00buxtuoft/page/n7/mode/2up

A Catholic History Of Great Britain (1921)

ℹ️ "THIS book is arranged, not on the chronological method, but on that of grouping important movements, so that they can be traced, in cause and event, throughout a considerable period. At the beginning of each period a bird's-eye glance is taken over the whole, in order to get these movements into right perspective ; and a brief preliminary explanation is given of contemporary foreign history when the latter in any way touches that of Britain. Without going into great detail in the matters of wars and constitutional changes, the main ideas underlying them, their causes, aims, and the degree of success to which they attained, are carefully studied; and in every period the social condition of the people is closely connected with their political history. Leading ideas, rather than unimportant facts, are emphasized; wide surveys rather than petty details are given; and the notion of development has been worked out from first to last." (Author's Note)

https://archive.org/details/catholichistoryo00wilmuoft/page/n5/mode/2up

A Short World History (1921)

📖 Divided in relatively short chapters, in turn divided into subsections; Ideal for novice readers.

ℹ️ "To write a complete History of the World within the limits assigned to this book would be, of course, to attempt the impossible. But the necessity of giving a wider view of history than is afforded by the courses usually followed in schools is so strongly felt to-day, that even a partial story of world development may be found useful as a class book, all the more, perhaps, because it does not pretend to deal exhaustively with the subject." (Introduction)

https://archive.org/details/shortworldhistor00wilm/page/n5

Alcuin (1922)

ℹ️ "THE scope of this series can be very accurately defined.

It is not meant to be a history of the Christian Church, nor even of Christian theology. Nor is it intended to set out the influence exercised in the world by the Catholic Church in every department alike, social, for example, artistic, or even moral. But Christian men have thought about their Faith in itself ; and about the world they live in, because of their Faith, and in relation to it. These volumes, therefore, aim at giving the reader pictures of eminent Catholic thinkers, and a sufficient statement of what they thought, and of the substantial contribution which they thus made to the history of ideas in the world, and to Christian civilisation in particular.

The writers have aimed at allowing their subjects, as far as possible, to speak for themselves : only a necessary minimum of comment or criticism has been supplied. On the other hand, it has been wished that not bloodless schemes of thought, merely. This is not meant to preclude this series from containing, if desirable, studies of men who, like Origen or John Eriugena, may not have been fully orthodox, or who, like Lamennais, have ended in rupture, even, from Catholic obedience nor abstract theories, should be made available to our readers ; nor again, detached "lives" of men and isolated personalities. Therefore a preliminary and a concluding volume have been planned, in which, respectively, are set out the massive historical movement within which these men were born, developed, and exerted their influence ; and, the continuous currents of thought which they necessarily created, deflected, accelerated, or checked. It should be added that the respective authors have freely formed and expressed their own estimates of their subject-matter, and that the series as such is not responsible for these. Nor has it been intended that the method of treatment and its application should be absolutely homogeneous in all the volumes alike.

Thus these volumes are not meant, then, at all as propaganda or apologetic. They hope to supply an organic survey of Catholic thought and a "live genealogy" of Catholic thinkers; so that from a comprehensive view and continuous vital contact, each reader may draw such general conclusions as he is able ; or enrich, substantiate, or correct, what he already possesses."
(Editor's Preface)

https://archive.org/details/alcuinwi00wilmuoft/page/4/mode/2up
Last edited by LectorRecitator on October 3rd, 2020, 3:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

pschempf
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Post by pschempf » October 1st, 2020, 6:13 pm

Ethel Mary Wilmot Buxton
(1870 - 1923)

https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/ethel-mary-wilmot-buxton-24-4ddfgq

These look interesting. :)
Fritz

"A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labors of a spasmodic Hercules."

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LectorRecitator
Posts: 157
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » October 2nd, 2020, 9:16 am

pschempf wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 6:13 pm
Ethel Mary Wilmot Buxton
(1870 - 1923)

https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/ethel-mary-wilmot-buxton-24-4ddfgq

These look interesting. :)
Thank you. Just to remind the moderators that there are already 2 titles by her in the catalogue, so as to accordingly insert date:

https://librivox.org/author/14545?primary_key=14545&search_category=author&search_page=1&search_form=get_results

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » October 3rd, 2020, 12:25 am

LectorRecitator wrote:
October 2nd, 2020, 9:16 am
pschempf wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 6:13 pm
Ethel Mary Wilmot Buxton
(1870 - 1923)

https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/ethel-mary-wilmot-buxton-24-4ddfgq

These look interesting. :)
Thank you. Just to remind the moderators that there are already 2 titles by her in the catalogue, so as to accordingly insert date:

https://librivox.org/author/14545?primary_key=14545&search_category=author&search_page=1&search_form=get_results
Done!

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