The Gate of Remembrance, by Frederick Bligh Bond (Archaeology/Necromancy)

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TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » September 21st, 2020, 11:48 am

We watched an episode of "Myth Hunters" the other night, and this came up. My write-up is from memory; fine details may be inaccurate. ;)

In the early 1900s, Frederick Bligh Bond, a pioneer in the field of archaeology, went on a search for King Arthur's bones at Glastonbury. (In the 12th Century, some monks from Glastonbury claimed to have found the bones of King Arthur and Guinevere, had them authenticated, and re-buried them.) He managed to find some forgotten parts of the old buildings using mathematics and number puzzles, but wasn't having success finding the burying place of Arthur. He turned to necromancy and automatic writing. He consulted a medium over a number of sessions and purportedly spoke with the 12th century monks, especially one named Jerome. Through automatic writing, Jerome helped him narrow down search for the grave of Arthur, finding the remains of an old, long-forgotten chapel. Bond never found the grave itself, but wrote a book about the search in 1918. He died in 1945.

The Gate of Remembrance is that book. It's on PG: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48568

It does have facsimiles of the automatic writing, but at a quick glance, it looks like the pictures are sufficiently described in the text, so the reader(s) wouldn't have to describe them.

It is a difficult text, because (as he says in the preface), there are passages in it of "a curious patchwork of Low Latin, Middle English of mixed periods, and Modern English of varied style and diction."

Approximately 40,000 words, or 4.5 hours of finished recording if done at an average pace of 150 wpm.
Mystery/PulpFic: Dope, by Sax Rohmer
The one that started them all: Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles
Elizabethan Poetry: The Psalmes of David
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Short essays: Elia, and The Last Essays of Elia

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