Edith Helen Sichel Bibliography (12 Titles)

Suggest and discuss books to read (all languages welcome!)
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LectorRecitator
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Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » September 3rd, 2020, 8:43 am

EDITH HELEN SICHEL (1862–1914)

The Story Of Two Salons (1895)

https://archive.org/details/storyoftwosalons00sichrich/page/n7

https://archive.org/details/storytwosalons00sichgoog/page/n8

Women And Men Of The French Renaissance (1901)

ℹ️ "It has been difficult to find a title modest enough for a book which in no way claims to be a chronicle of events, political or military. It is merely a personal history—an effiort to recall a few of the less-known figures that moved and had their being in France, in the first half of the sixteenth century." (Preface)

https://archive.org/details/cu31924024317095/page/n7

https://archive.org/details/womenmenoffrench00sichrich/page/n11

The Woodhouse Correspondence (1904)

https://archive.org/details/woodhousecorresp00russrich/page/n3

Catherine De' Medici And The French Reformation (1905)

https://archive.org/details/catherinedemedi00sichgoog/page/n13

https://archive.org/details/catherinedemedic00sich/page/n9

The Life And Letters Of Alfred Ainger (1906)

https://archive.org/details/lifelettersofalf00sich/page/n7

https://archive.org/details/cu31924013205210/page/n10

The Later Years Of Catherine De' Medici (1908)

ℹ️ "THE second half of my study of Catherine de' Medici hardly seems to need any preface, and yet I should like to take the opportunity of once again defining the scope of my work. I can make no claim to figure as an expert historian. My aim has been no more than to paint portraits—to draw the central figure of Catherine as I see her, with such other persons in the drama as were interwoven with her destiny, standing out against a multi-coloured background and throwing strong shadows upon it. I have detected no error in accepted dates ; I have made no discovery of an actual fact. Yet the research into character may shed fresh light upon old events, may account for the unaccountable, and harmonize what is discordant. And the comments of contemporaries when read for themselves, apart from any larger historical purpose, acquire a new vitality. They sharpen our perception of detail, and give us that more personal aspect of the strange things that happen which often explains them. It is from this point of view alone that I venture to reproduce such famous catastrophes as the Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Eve, or the murder of Henri, Duc de Guise." (Preface)

https://archive.org/details/lateryearsofcath00sich/page/n7

https://archive.org/details/cu31924028127896/page/n9

Gathered Leaves: From The Prose Of Mary E. Coleridge (1910)

https://archive.org/details/gatheredleavesfr00colerich/page/n10

https://archive.org/details/cu31924013597301/page/n9

The Household Of The Lafayettes (1910, 3d Edition)

https://archive.org/details/cu31924024305199/page/n9

https://archive.org/details/householdoflafay00sichuoft/page/n7

Michel De Montaigne (1911)

https://archive.org/details/cu31924027969009/page/n10

https://archive.org/details/micheldemontaign00sichrich/page/n10

The Renaissance (1914)

https://archive.org/details/renaissance00sichrich/page/n6

New And Old (1917) with an Introduction by Bradley, Andrew Cecil (1851–1935)

https://archive.org/details/cu31924013551316/page/n9

https://archive.org/details/newold00sichrich/page/n7

Edith Sichel: Letters, Verses, And Other Writings (1918) edited by Ritchie, Emily Marion (????–1932)

ℹ️ "THE extracts in this volume from Edith's letters, poems, and other writings have been put together in the confidence that her voice, speaking throughout them, will bring happiness to the friends in whose lives her absence has made so deep a void. They will see that the letters, as well as the verses, are more personal than those chosen for the published book, and will notice, perhaps with some surprise, that they come from only a few sources although Edith's ever-outgoing nature made her a lavish letter-writer. But it so happens that her deeply-loved family, to whom she wrote constantly when absent from them, and her other friends find the ones they have in their possession are of too passing a nature, or too intimately full of their own concerns, to be shared." (Preface)

https://archive.org/details/edithsichellette00sichuoft/page/n5

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